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vt_investor 257 posts  |  Last Activity: May 26, 2016 1:23 PM Member since: Apr 29, 1999
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  • vt_investor vt_investor Apr 12, 2016 12:39 PM Flag

    Petraeus gave papers that he knew to be classified secret to his journalist girlfriend, and then he lied about it to the FBI. He paid a $100K fine and did not spend a single day in jail.

    To the best of our knowledge now, Hilary did not give secret classified papers to anyone, and she did not lie about any of it, either. Her case can't be compared with Petraeus. Hilary made a bad choice (one of a few) that hurt her public image, but that is all.

    Republican leaders know what is going to happen, and it's not what all those talk radio hosts have been saying. It'll be interesting to see how they explain to their listeners that all their wet dreams were not facts at all.

  • Reply to

    United health care pulling out of Obamacare

    by springer_1994 Apr 11, 2016 10:20 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Apr 11, 2016 12:11 PM Flag

    Insurance companies seem to have figured out how to handle that. United Healthcare appears to offer plans in all 50 states. (At least I couldn't find a state where you couldn't get a UHC plan). A few lawyers, and a good shell company works every time.

  • Reply to

    United health care pulling out of Obamacare

    by springer_1994 Apr 11, 2016 10:20 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Apr 11, 2016 11:26 AM Flag

    United Healthcare is probably the insurance company with the greatest number or customer/patient complaints. We looked at them as a possible insurance company for my family. A short search showed that dealing with them appears to be nearly impossible for anyone. They were not for us. I expect that many others have made the same decision.

  • Reply to

    Clinton's push for no free higher education

    by rz400 Apr 8, 2016 4:10 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Apr 11, 2016 11:16 AM Flag

    It goes in cycles, or simply continues with little change from decade to decade, and from century to century.

    For more than a couple of centuries, New England, and most northern states have worked hard to see that every citizen was well educated, and that schools existed to provide that education. And over those same couple of centuries, most southern states have worked hard to assure that schools for most were poor to non-existent, as they continued efforts to keep many, if not most, citizens from the voting both.

    If you grow up in an environment where good schooling is hard to get, that's what most thing should always be the case. And if you grow up in an environment where all are expected to get a good education, no matter what, then that is what you will continue to do. Minds don't change quickly, or at all, at least not until people have had enough and force a change.

  • Reply to

    Golden Sacks say time to normalize fed rate

    by unclefulbert Apr 7, 2016 11:09 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Apr 11, 2016 11:02 AM Flag

    Oops. Typo. It should be ""want to", not "what to".

    And I agree that the tax code needs to be simplified and corrected. Years ago that was all that fuss about how the IRS was focusing on political campaign organizations. Iyt quickly became clear that the IRS had misinterpreted existing tax law, and that the law was perhaps too complex. That was was an excellent chance for Congress to fix - and simplify - the lax laws. I am sure that the president would have signed a law that fixed that IRS error, and simplified the tax code. Why has Congress done absolutely nothing, except to simply forget that there is even a problem?

    Write your representatives, and ask them to do something!

  • Reply to

    Clinton's push for no free higher education

    by rz400 Apr 8, 2016 4:10 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Apr 9, 2016 12:33 PM Flag

    There two trends that have created the current problems in higher education.

    1. First college and university attendance has been growing at a rate between 10% and 20% each decade for the pas 50 years, at least. (In the 1970's the increase was more than 40%!) At many state universities and colleges, it has been even higher than that, as those schools cost less than the Ivy Leagues. . Since 1975, the total number of students has more than doubled.

    2. At the same time, state and federal funding for higher education has been dropping, One measure says that since 1980, government funding for higher education has dropped by more than 40%. If this trend continues, by 2059, state schools will have absolutely no government funding at all.

    So, add it up. What happens when the number of customers (students) doubles, while funding is cut in half? What do you get? You get exactly what we are seeing right now. Exploding tuition costs for students. Huge class sizes. Classes taught by "part time" adjunct teachers, who seldom make enough to to stay above the poverty level. It's an even bigger problem now, as many VETs return from the Middle East and want to use the GI Bill to go to school, causing attendance to increase even further.

    Springer, is right. Big changes are needed. But they may not be the changes that Springer expects..

  • Reply to

    Clinton's push for no free higher education

    by rz400 Apr 8, 2016 4:10 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Apr 8, 2016 6:49 AM Flag

    Public schools were rare in the19th century only in certain parts of the country. In the south public schools were rare then. The aristocrats who ran that part of the country could see no good reason for educating the masses, and they did not do that.

    However, in the north, and especially in New England, there was a school in every town and village at the time the Constitution was written. . Many New England towns had a dozen schools because they wanted one within walking distance of every household. In New England, they knew that no democratic republic could exist without an education population. But in the south they were always more interested in keeping all but the aristocrats from having any ability to vote or to control the government, that they though only their right. In the south, they thought that schools were unnecessary for most, well into the 20th century.

  • Reply to

    Golden Sacks say time to normalize fed rate

    by unclefulbert Apr 7, 2016 11:09 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Apr 7, 2016 1:45 PM Flag

    I'd agree with you, Springer, if it weren't for the fact that companies now are richer than they have ever been. US companies now have trillions of dollars in cash sitting around that they don't know how to spend. If companies didn't have enough to invest in the future, or even to pay the payroll, I'd agree with you. But, at present companies have more money then even they know what to do with. When companies what to buy another company, they do it. When companies what to invest in new factories, they do it. When companies see an opportunity they can fill, they do it.

  • Reply to

    Golden Sacks say time to normalize fed rate

    by unclefulbert Apr 7, 2016 11:09 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Apr 7, 2016 1:20 PM Flag

    You've got it right, Springer. (Can't believe that i agree with you on this one..)

    The problem is what's happened to 90% of Americans,including the Middle Class, and all those not in the upper 5%. Over the past half century our productivity has increased by an order of magnitude. A car can now be built with 1/10 the number of man-hours. .

    The problem causing all those things that you list is that absolutely none of the profits resulting from that increased productivity has gone to the middle Class workers. All of the profits have gone to those who own the machines (computers, robots, internet, assembly lines, ...) that have caused the increase in productivity and profit.

    The owners ca easily lay off a worker and replace him with a machine. There are no longer any unions so workers can negotiate to keep their jobs, or to get a piece of the increased profits. Therefore we now see those things that you list. Five percent of Americans (the machine owners) double and triple their incomes, while everyone else sees no hope for a pay increase, or even enough to fed their families in many cases.

    What we gunna do about it? It doesn't add up, and it won't until we do something about it. Productivity continues to increase, and more and more Middle Class jobs become unnecessary. Truck drivers are next in line.

  • vt_investor vt_investor Apr 7, 2016 10:50 AM Flag

    Never trust anyone over 30!

  • Reply to

    Cruz + Kasich = market rally

    by langosta_fla Apr 6, 2016 11:04 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor Apr 7, 2016 10:47 AM Flag

    :) :) :)

    So what were the right - and wrong - reasons? What did your representatives say when you wrote to tell them to be sure to oppose those Republican sponsored bills for the right reasons?

  • Reply to

    Cruz + Kasich = market rally

    by langosta_fla Apr 6, 2016 11:04 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor Apr 7, 2016 10:21 AM Flag

    So you must be a big supporter of Bernie, ten! He continually voted no on bills like the Financial Services Act of 1998, and the Financial Services Regulatory Relief Act of 2004. The are the banking deregulation acts that opened the floodgates and allowed banks to create the housing bubble. The removed banking regulations that were created after the great depression to protect citizens' deposits and to keep banks from creating another depression, as they did then.

    These banking deregulation bills were proposed and sponsored by Republicans, and passed with huge Republican majorities, with some additional Democrat support.

    But Bernie, opposed them all, so that must be why you support him so strongly!

  • Reply to

    The Low Growth Future

    by w.heinlein Apr 6, 2016 5:34 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor Apr 7, 2016 1:38 AM Flag

    Lan, I think you are right. As more and more of the baby boomers retire, that means there are more and more people who no longer need or want new furniture, lawn mowers, or fancy new electronic devices. That's been a big problem in Japan for a long time. It is also becoming a big problem in China as those millions of single children beginning to need to support their parents.

    America's biggest growth engine has always been immigration, as we let in millions of new young people, as well as having many children of our own. The economy is driven by young workers providing goods and services for us all, and also as they built and furnished their own houses. 1 or 2 kids per family here, and our efforts to shut down the immigration flow also must shut down our economic engine. Without a strong demand, and workers to fill that demand, there can be little economic growth.

    We don't know how to run an economy that is top heavy with a lot of retired people. We don't know how to run an economy that grows no faster than our population grows. We are experiencing the same problem that Europe, Japan, and China are now seeing. We are going to need to learn to live in a world with slow growth, or at least a slow population growth. It's not going to be easy - or maybe even possible - to untie economic growth from population growth.

  • Reply to

    Really Expensive Billboard Against Trump

    by trueallday Apr 4, 2016 10:42 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Apr 6, 2016 11:17 AM Flag

    If he's on some ballots and off others, that could make a 3rd party candidate even more probable.

  • Reply to

    Really Expensive Billboard Against Trump

    by trueallday Apr 4, 2016 10:42 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Apr 5, 2016 12:17 AM Flag

    And, meanwhile, while the Donald - Hillary battle progresses, there's another question waiting to be answered on the horizon.

    Suppose that Cruz does defeat Trump at the convention and becomes the Republican nominee. How soon after he is nominated, do you suppose that a case will be brought before a court somewhere across this nation That is a court case suing Mr. Cruz because they don't think that a man born in Canada, a man who has been a Canadian citizen for much of his life, can be the US president, according to the US Constitution. Be sure to bring the case in a court in a jurisdiction where the outcome will most likely say that Cruz can not be president. Then, when the Supreme Court opinion ties 4-4, the lower court decision will stand.

    There may be no end to the excitement this election year!

  • Reply to

    Guns and Butter

    by w.heinlein Apr 4, 2016 3:55 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor Apr 5, 2016 12:01 AM Flag

    As we've discussed in another thread, 3/4 of the federal budget is Social Security, Medicare (and other health care), and defense. Anyone who wants to cut the budget is going to need to tell us how they plan to cut these things. The rest of the budget is so small that there is little left there to cut that would make any difference. So, if you want to cut the budget, tell us how you will cut these 3 parts that really count. Otherwise, you are just another no-show at the budget cutting meeting.

  • vt_investor vt_investor Apr 4, 2016 11:30 AM Flag

    It's not hard to find were federal spending has been going:
    In 2015, it was

    - nearly 1/2 of all federal spending went to social security, medicare, and health care

    - Another 1/3 of federal spending when to military pay and equipment and other military contracts, including support for veterans.

    - The rest was split up among thousands of things, from your Representative's pay to the FBI, and interest on the debt.

  • vt_investor vt_investor Apr 4, 2016 10:27 AM Flag

    So, if that happened, it's no longer the fault for the guy who was just elected and is then in charge, but instead the fault of the guy who preceded him?

  • vt_investor vt_investor Apr 3, 2016 11:58 AM Flag

    Exactly. Political parties can chose their candidates in any way they wish. Most, such as the American Conservative Party, the Veterans Party, or the Transhumanist Party have no primaries at all. The Green party does have a number of primary elections to chose delegates to their convention. They may be the only other party to use use primaries to chose convention delegates, besides the Republicans ans Democrats. The Libertarian party has 4 or 5 primaries, but they appear to be simply beauty contests. It looks like anyone can attend the Libertarian convention (May 26, Orlando, Fla), if they wish, either representing their state party, or on their own.

  • vt_investor by vt_investor Apr 2, 2016 2:22 PM Flag

    I've recently read a lot of headlines saying that they expect the Republican convention to be chaos. Pundits on both the right and the left are saying the same thing. How could this possibly be true? How could anyone expect chaos with today's Republicans?

    Today's Republicans clearly know how to organize and manage anything. Set their goals. Let people know what the goals are, and then do what needs to be done to accomplish those goals. Republicans have always been good at that, haven't they? It doesn't matter what it is, they will get it done. It might be building a housing development; drilling an oil well; organizing a speaking engagement; running their convention; or even running the whole country. Republican get it done with little fuss no confusion, and certainly no chaos!

    So how could anyone expect chaos at a Republican convention that only lasts a few days? From the people who just know how to get it done?

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