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Hewlett-Packard Company Message Board

vt_investor 113 posts  |  Last Activity: 1 hour 43 minutes ago Member since: Apr 29, 1999
  • Reply to

    A Homer Simpson Moment

    by springer_1994 Jun 8, 2015 12:02 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor Jun 9, 2015 9:42 AM Flag

    When do you think that our congress will discuss ISIS and decide what our strategy should be with them? They are the only ones who have the Constitutional authority to declare war and to set to our national strategy in dealing with them.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    Stock Buybacks..

    by vt_investor Jun 1, 2015 2:54 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor Jun 1, 2015 2:58 PM Flag

    And there we have it, as Cornell law professor, Lynn Stout says, a perverse incentive for corporate leaders (stock owners all), to cut investments in factories, research, development, employees, new products, and more in order to have billions of dollars to use to buy their stock shares back.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • vt_investor by vt_investor Jun 1, 2015 2:54 PM Flag

    There was a front page article in yesterday's newspaper about stock buybacks. They called then a feast for investors, but that they sell workers short. The initial example was 6,000 Cisco employees who wee recently laid off, while CEO John Chambers was calling the company a "cash and profit machine". with the stock a near all-time high. A big part of the high stock price for Cisco, HPQ, and many other companies is that the companies are spending billions of dollars to buy their stock back. There is a stock buyback boom!

    30 years ago major companies had 70% of their profits available to reinvest in the company, new plants and equipment, more and better workers, expansion. Now, as of 2014, just 2% of the profits is invested in the company. The rest is used for a combination of dividends and stock buyback.

    William Lazonick, a UMass professor says that stock buybacks should be illegal because they are simply a way to manipulate the market. Buybacks were created because of two different US law changes. The first happened in 1882, as part of Reagan's efforts at deregulation. Reagan's law made increased buyback amounts legal. It told companies they would not be prosecuted for price manipulation with big buybacks. A second obscure rile change happened in 1993. Clinton didn't the huge, excessive pay for CEOs. So in 1993, a law was passed making any pay over $1 million not be deductible as a business expense.

    So, how do you now pay a CEO more than a million dollars? You give then stock whose value is rising. How do you assure that the stock values continue to rise? You buy back shares reducing the number of share available.

    So here we are today. Most Americans don't care what the price of a share of stock is (only half of all Americans own any stock at all). Add in a theory that says that a company is run only for the benefit of the shareholders - and not for it's workers, it's neighbors, or for society or the nation at all.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    Here comes the "R" word.

    by youreallyarestupid_duh May 29, 2015 11:34 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor May 29, 2015 2:51 PM Flag

    There really appears to be something wrong with the Q1 data. For quite a while now, Q1 has come in with numbers that don't meet expectations, at all, while the other 3 quarters do just fine.

    Here, at least, the economy looks just fine. Houses are being built. Cars are being sold. Every graduate I know has a good job offer, and will start work soon. Most had 2 or 3 offers, and they got to pick the best one. Six years ago no one had a job offer, and couldn't find a job anywhere, except maybe filing bags at the grocery store.

    The perpetual Q1 problem appears to be more a data management and collection problem, and not a real problem with the economy.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    Why so much non-HPQ talk?

    by liarliar663 May 21, 2015 12:09 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor May 22, 2015 5:00 PM Flag

    Actually, the real Memorial Day is next Saturday, May 30. For some reason, somebody decided that it had to be on a Monday, rather than the day it was originally held, when it was called Decoration Day. Here, our parade and cemetery decorations happen next weekend. (Gotta do it the right way, of course..;)

    Sentiment: Hold

  • vt_investor vt_investor May 21, 2015 11:43 PM Flag

    We're all waiting for the fall split up, now. Everything else is just a bump in the road. It would be nice to know a little more about what the new companies will be, how they will be run, what they will be called and what the stock symbols will be, what they will provide for dividends, how hpq shares will be divided, and what people think they will actually do.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    The Quagmire

    by w.heinlein May 20, 2015 5:14 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor May 21, 2015 5:06 PM Flag

    Of course he would align with Iran. Assad is a member of a Shi'a sect. He and the Iranians have opposed the Sunni based ISIS groups nearly forever. If we were to align ourselves with Assad, we would need to ally ourselves with Iran, as well. It would be no different from our need to ally with the USSR during WWII.

    If we really want to get invoked in a war in the Middle East now, the only question we would need to answer is which Mus lim sect do we align ourselves with. That is if we really want to shed American blood, and spend American dollars over there in a Mu slim religious war.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    The Quagmire

    by w.heinlein May 20, 2015 5:14 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor May 21, 2015 4:58 PM Flag

    Yes, we do have a wide range of bombs and guns to chose from, but in the end we either must support or oppose ISIS. If we oppose ISIS, then we support Iran, and if we support ISIS, then we opposes Iran. Iran's Shia have opposed the ISIS Sunnis for centuries. Neither is going to change any time soon, unless we or someone can convince them to live together in peace.

    Should we spend our money to help Iran and ISIS fight a war with each other, using our tax dollars, and American lives, or should we spend out tax dollars in an attempt to convince them to live together in peace? Which is in America's best interest, and closer to America's basic philosophy?

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    The Quagmire

    by w.heinlein May 20, 2015 5:14 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor May 21, 2015 2:27 PM Flag

    It sound like your "other choice" is to align ourselves with the "legitimate government" of Syria and the current leader Bashir Assad - and their strongest strategic ally, Iran. Is that what you want? How do you propose that we strengthen that alliance and help them defeat ISIS?

    You do seem to be entering that quagmire, yourself!

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    The Quagmire

    by w.heinlein May 20, 2015 5:14 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor May 21, 2015 2:19 PM Flag

    You are right. We do have other choices, but none of the other choices involve the military. The other choices are all based on things like diplomacy and foreign aid. Which of the other choices did you have in mind?

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    The Quagmire

    by w.heinlein May 20, 2015 5:14 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor May 21, 2015 12:14 AM Flag

    We have essentially two choice: Ally ourselves with Iran in their fight with ISIS, or ally ourselves with ISIS in their fight with Iran. If ISIS wins, the guy we don't like in Syria may lose power, but if Iran wins, the Syrian leader may be out. Regardless of who wins, Christians, Kurds, Je ws, and other minorities in the area are out of luck. Unless we can convince then all that working together to grown the economy, education, and national infrastructures is the right thing to do, we can never win in the Middle East. And the people who live there can't win, either, unless they decide to focus on building, rather than destruction.. It's their quagmire, not ours, unless we chose to get stuck in it. Unfortunately, there may not be much we can do except for putting up barriers to keep ourselves and others out of the quagmire.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    A Little Humility Goes A Long Way

    by w.heinlein May 19, 2015 12:51 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor May 19, 2015 3:10 PM Flag

    W.H., i agree with most of what you say. Saddam was never a good guy, and he never liked the USA. Bush and Co. had a long list of reasons what we should invade Iraq. But even then, it looked like bush and a very selective focus. He accepted the reasons why we should invade Iraq - even though it turns out some of them were not true. He also completely rejected even considering a list of reasons why that invasion would be a bad idea, and he also avoided any discussion with many who thought a war in Iraq was wrong, including many military leaders and some members of the JCS. As you said, he did not consider history, or those who studied history and who said that such an invasion is seldom successful. He ignored inspectors in Iraq, including some Americans, who said that there were no WMD's there. And certainly, even though Saddam had applauded on 9/11, there was no evidence that he had been involved in the terrorist act. My biggest complaint about GWB is that he appeared unable, or unwilling , to evaluate and consider ALL the information at his disposal, before he made that trillion+ dollar decision.

    I still remember hearing on that Saturday night, the news that the bombardment had begin. I hoped that we would be successful, but I was very worried that we we may have gotten ourselves into something that we really had no business doing. You are right. Humility goes a very long way, and if used correctly, it can save a lot of money and lives.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • vt_investor vt_investor May 19, 2015 10:02 AM Flag

    " operation out of the Benghazi embassy which resulted in these deaths"

    Right. There was an operation run from the Benghazi consulate (it's was never an embassy) to attack the consulate building and kill the people inside. What's the reason for doing that again?

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    I'd to comment about HPQ stock...

    by langosta_fla May 18, 2015 2:20 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor May 18, 2015 4:50 PM Flag

    HPQ won't be a stock for much longer. Do you know what the new companies and their stock symbols will be?

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    Bond market yields and retirement planning

    by w.heinlein May 15, 2015 12:38 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor May 16, 2015 10:51 AM Flag

    I agree. Technological changes have made some huge changes in our economy and our work environment. Over the past 20 years, our manufacturing output in the US has grown by about 80%, according to a recent report, while our population has barely grown by 18%., and manufacturing employment has not grown at all.

    With these changes, the value of companies, and their equities are up a lot, as is the wealth of the corporate owners. At the same time middle class employment and manufacturing employment are down, and unemployment is up. Middle class wealth and spending power is down.

    This is not something that can be easily changed. Manufacturing and corporate output will continue to increase, while employment will remain stuck , and middle class income continues to hold steady or even decrease.

    How can this be fixed. I wish I (or anyone else) knew. It's much easier and cheaper to start a new company now, as manufacturing costs are now much less. There are many new companies now with less than a dozen employees that are worth 10's of millions of dollars. There's no need to sell millions of dollars worth of bonds to build a big factory, because no factory is needed. Just build your apps in the spare bedroom, and sell them on the Internet!

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    The Bill Clinton of Gluttony

    by w.heinlein May 11, 2015 11:06 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor May 12, 2015 1:42 PM Flag

    I wondered the same thing! But, then, I wondered if each team might control just the balls that they will use. - which sounds like very poor management policies, but then again this is football we are taking about..

    Sentiment: Hold

  • vt_investor vt_investor May 10, 2015 10:41 AM Flag

    Yes, pretty extrema northeast! I just kept getting "Failed to post" messages, but I could still do thumbs up and down, if I wanted to. It was clearly a bug in their software. And a search showed that the same bug, or a similar one has caused y! problems in the past.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • vt_investor vt_investor May 9, 2015 11:25 AM Flag

    A test to so if it works here. I haven't been able to post for a week or more.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    Urban Homicide Rates

    by w.heinlein Apr 22, 2015 12:26 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor Apr 23, 2015 1:46 AM Flag

    I read a while ago that NYC has been putting more cops on the street, especially in higher crime areas, but, as you say, there are probably other changes, as well.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    GOP proposing the Death of the Death Tax

    by c8w73 Apr 16, 2015 3:51 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor Apr 17, 2015 8:39 PM Flag

    I don't know much about them (small businesses), myself, except for the couple I am involved with.

    But the BizBuySell Insight report says that the median sale price for small businesses in Q1 this year was $225,000. That's probably a reasonable value when you consider that most small businesses are things like small retail stores, plumbing, carpentry, and electrical businesses.

    So, if half of all small businesses are worth $225,000 or less, as this report says, how many small businesses do you think are worth more than $5.3 million, which is the value needed to bring the estate tax into play?

    Sentiment: Hold

HPQ
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