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Hewlett-Packard Company Message Board

vt_investor 305 posts  |  Last Activity: 23 hours ago Member since: Apr 29, 1999
  • vt_investor vt_investor Jun 6, 2014 11:11 AM Flag

    I guess that there are some people who will be surprised to learn that right now there are RECORD numbers of US citizens living right here in the good 'ol US or A!

    One of the biggest problems with work today, is the ways that it has changed over the past couple of decades. Now there are some more very high paying jobs for the wealthiest among us. That 1% or 5% continues to grow in size (just about as fast as our population grows!!) And their incomes increase at the fastest rate of anyone else in the country, too.

    At the same time, the number and income of the people at the other end of the scale (where poverty thrives and grows) is also increasing.

    It's the peoepl in the middle, the old middle class who are moving out to either end of the scale. Why is this? That answer is easier to understand when you look at the manufacturing costs for all the things that we buy today. Take an iphone for example. Most reports show that of the approximate $250 cost of an iphone, less than 10%, or $25 of that cost is for the labor to make it. Similar evaluations for other things that we buy, have been made. For a car, today, the manufacturing labor costs are also $10, or less of the total production price. The same is true for televisions, refrigerators, and just about everything else we buy.

    30 years ago manufacturing labor costs were a much bigger percent fo the final cost, for a couple of reasons. first we didn't have all the fancy robotics and production equipment that now do much of the work that a worker's hands did 30 years ago. So, more people were hired back then to do the work. Those workers were paid more, on an inflation adjusted basis. Middle class pay has been flat (inflation adjusted), since Reagan was president. So, even though today's workers are MUCH more productive, they are seeing none of the benefits of their increased productivity.

    So, how do we fix the problem? Middle calls workers work harder and produce more , but they are paid less, or not at all.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    New data .........

    by springer_1994 Jun 5, 2014 7:34 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Jun 5, 2014 9:47 AM Flag

    Something is very wrong with your report! If there realty has been no change for a couple of decades, then then last fall, our first frost would have been the end of September, rather than near Halloween, as it really was. And if there has been no change, then our last from this spring would have been about May 20, rather than April 20, as it really was.

    Until there is real data that shows otherwise, the real data here, and in most of the country, from Alaska to Maine, in Europe, Australia, and Asia, shows that warming is alive and well. It hasn't changed much in the past few years, but it is still a lot warmer than it was in the past. And secondary effects, including big storms, melting glaciers, floods, and droughts, are happening more and more often, as well.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • vt_investor vt_investor Jun 3, 2014 2:38 PM Flag

    I think it's very regional, and also it depend on what era you are talking about.

    It's regional because in some areas (especially the south) health insurance and care is not easily available, through employers or on one's own. There, many love it, in spite of the long waits, and long drives. However, in other places, where employers provide health insurance if they can do it at all, and where a decent doctor can be found within a few miles, the long drives and long waits for the VA are not well appreciated.

    And, finally, a few decades ago, in our grandparents day, Congress understood our WWII veterans' legacy to the nation, and they funded the VA at a level that better represented what we owed our veterans then.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • vt_investor vt_investor Jun 3, 2014 10:39 AM Flag

    Many Americans are finding themselves in the position we are in here now. Our newest car is more then 6 years old, and our oldest car is nearly 20 years old. At some point soon we will need to replace one or more of those vehicles. But, the auto manufactures have, at least partly brought this on themselves. Cars last much longer now than they did. It's not hard now to find millions of cars that are well over 10 years old, and still going strong. People just don't need to buy cars as often as thy used to buy them, so sales are going to be slower now.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • vt_investor vt_investor Jun 3, 2014 10:20 AM Flag

    That's exactly what I've been telling my reps, and others. Sell all the Vet hospitals and clinics to private companies, or give them to non-profits. (Would the VFW want to run some non-profit hospitals and clinics?). Then begin something we might call VETAid, something similar to Medicaid, but for veterans, which would pay for health insurance for VETs. Then they could pick any doctor or hospital they wished (no more 200 mile drives), and get much better and quicker care, as well. In addition the bureaucracy would be gone, and the costs for taxpayers would be less.

    Special veterans' health care was created in an era when millions of Americans had no health care at all. Now that's changed, and everyone can get health care, so we should take advantage of those changes, and give our vets decent and more easily available heath care, too.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    bettyfan, ISM data erred: 56%, not 53.6%

    by unclefulbert Jun 2, 2014 11:42 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Jun 3, 2014 10:06 AM Flag

    Rah: "count the trillions of dollars we spend on other things as "unfunded""

    Yes, we could do that. That's the choice we need to make. Do we stop paying trillions for a war on the other side of the globe, or de we stop spending trillions in things here. We could shut down air traffic control from midnight to 8 AM; we could stop spending anything to maintain the roads we drive on (even though we add 3 million new drivers each and every year); We could stop paying for unemployment support (and let laid off workers take it out on the employers who laid them off with all their guns.). It's clear what you'd rather spend your tax dollars on!

    And that's an interesting possibility. What happens when employers let employees bring guns to work - and into the room where they are told they will lose their job? Should be a fun place to work.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    bettyfan, ISM data erred: 56%, not 53.6%

    by unclefulbert Jun 2, 2014 11:42 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Jun 2, 2014 4:55 PM Flag

    Did we do them for free?

    Sure. We haven't paid a cent for either one of them yet. The money was all borrowed, and maybe our grandchildren will pay for them. Maybe. If we'd increased taxes by 20%, rather than cutting taxes 10 years ago, we might have mostly paid for them by now. But, we didn't. So we did them for free. So far, and out national debt is what it is now.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    For you gun haters...

    by romannorga Jun 1, 2014 11:31 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Jun 2, 2014 12:58 PM Flag

    And it might just result in a gun fight between 2 or 3 drunken patrons. Who's going to want to take that chance? Something for restaurant owners to consider, for sure!

    Sentiment: Hold

  • vt_investor vt_investor Jun 2, 2014 8:25 AM Flag

    So, tell us, when someone walks into a restaurant with a gun, how does anyone tell whether he is gun carrying nut, or a mass murderer? Do all gun carrying crazies wear tin foil hats, as well, so we can tell the difference?

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    For you gun haters...

    by romannorga Jun 1, 2014 11:31 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Jun 2, 2014 12:58 AM Flag

    But there is also no evidence that anyone carrying a gun has ever helped stop any mass murder, either. In fact, in that Ariz. shooting where a Congresswomen was shot, there was a guy with a gun, but he never used it. The shooter was taken out when he was reloading by a lady who hit him in the back, and then a 74 year old man sat on him.

    The only way to stop these mass shooting is to keep the guns out of the hands of the criminals and the insane. but that is not happening. Over the past 20 years the number of guns in circulation has more than doubled, and the guns are easier to get, easier to hide, and easier to use. Almost all the guns used by mass murderers were acquired legally, in spite of their mental illnesses.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    For you gun haters...

    by romannorga Jun 1, 2014 11:31 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Jun 2, 2014 12:42 AM Flag

    Lang, the incidence is also inversely proportional to education level, and directly proportional to income level, and church attendance. Perhaps we'd get even better results by not allowing anyone to o have a gun, unless he or she had a college degree, income above $60K/year, and who never went to church. Or more simply just don't allow gun ownership in states where the gun homicide rate is 5.0 or larger per 100K population. That would drop the national gun homicide rate by a huge amount. Those states are, Oklahoma, Florida, Texas, Penn., Delaware, Georgia, Ariz., Miss., Tenn., Michigan, New Mexico, Nevada, South Carolina, Missouri, Maryland, Louisiana, and DC.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    For you gun haters...

    by romannorga Jun 1, 2014 11:31 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Jun 1, 2014 4:55 PM Flag

    Many restaurants seem to be concerned about any guns in their establishments, now.

    The only shooting that I know to have happened in a restaurant so far is a woman who was shot in a Texas restaurant! Googlefor "Diana Barker Houston restaurant shooting" I'm not sure if it was a concealed carry or not. She is suing the gun owner, after being shot and spending weeks in a hospital undergoing surgeries to restore her to something almost normal. Someone else might have sued the restaurant, as well, and I'm sure that restaurant owners are concerned about that possibility. And restaurants are also concerned, I'm sure, about losing costumers who don't want to take their kids, or their grandparents, or they, themselves, to a restaurant where they might be caught in a crossfire, or hit accidentally.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    For you gun haters...

    by romannorga Jun 1, 2014 11:31 AM
    vt_investor vt_investor Jun 1, 2014 11:49 AM Flag

    And unfortunately, that's the decision that restaurant owners are now being forced to make. Should they let the few people like you bring guns in to their restaurant? Or should they not let people bring guns into their restaurant for the other 90% who don't want to get caught in the middle of a gun fight when they bring their kids to a restaurant, and someone with a gun has had a couple extra drinks. Its the restaurant owners' choice, and they are being forced to make it now.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • vt_investor vt_investor May 31, 2014 10:13 AM Flag

    You are correct, corn flakes, wheaties, shredded wheat, and oatmeal have not changed much since they were introduced. But what has changed is lots of newer cereals, like fruit loops, honey-nut cheerios, coco puffs, and lucky charms have been added to the selection One other change with many cereals is the replacement of sugar with corn syrup. So, you are not really incorrect, with your attempt to mislead. Nothing new - except for the introduction of hundreds of highly sugared new cereals.

    And there is a lot of highly preserved food that is available from the government for school cafeterias. It's often surplus food that was created to be used by soldiers in the case of war

    Many schools have started to use more fresh food, and to hire real restaurant cooks in order to improve school food over the past decade or more. Talk to your school board about that, if that still has not been done at your schools.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • vt_investor vt_investor May 30, 2014 5:30 PM Flag

    The fare is certainly different in different schools. If the food is so bad in your schools, then you need to visit your school board and get it changed. Although certainly not gourmet, school lunches here are OK. I've eaten there a few times. My daughter eats at the salad bar usually, and claims it's not bad. If the food is so bad at your schools, who's not paying attention there?

    Sentiment: Hold

  • vt_investor vt_investor May 30, 2014 5:23 PM Flag

    All we would need to do is to interpret the word "arms" as used on the Constitution in the same way that the founding fathers interpreted the word, and about all our mass shootings would go away, as would most of the shootings of children, as well. That's thousands of deaths and injuries avoided e very year, by simply interpreting the Constitution as the founding fathers interpreted it.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • vt_investor vt_investor May 30, 2014 1:54 PM Flag

    "The definition of arms as written and understood even then included all firearms."

    so, you are now just including all firearms that they knew of when the constitution was written? If those were the only "arms" allowed then the number of gun deaths in our country might drop by thousands! Or is there some magic that allows things that the writers of the Constitution never even knew of to be dded to the list of "arms"?

    Sentiment: Hold

  • vt_investor vt_investor May 30, 2014 1:16 PM Flag

    Our Constitution says nothing at all about guns. The word is never used in the Constitution. The Constitution says, "the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.". And then it gives our courts and legislatures the right to define which arms, and when and where they can be born.

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    Five Reasons

    by vt_investor May 29, 2014 12:58 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor May 30, 2014 1:03 PM Flag

    You are right Springer. The student loan problem is huge and needs to be fixed. You want some real numbers? how's this.

    Republicans in Congress recently got the Democrats to finally agree to a students loan rate of 10.5% (but "just" 8.5% when they are still in school). This at the same time that the Feds continue to loan money to banks at a rate of 0.25% or less. How's that for investing in our future?

    Have you told your Republican Congressmen that you want the student loan problem fixed, yet? think you can get your Repub. congressmen to something less than 10%?

    Sentiment: Hold

  • Reply to

    Five Reasons

    by vt_investor May 29, 2014 12:58 PM
    vt_investor vt_investor May 30, 2014 10:14 AM Flag

    Amoulits1, Yes, you may be right. I was mostly guessing with those 2% and 1% numbers. After looking at the real numbers for inflation and population growth, I see 1% and 2% may both be a bit high (but both numbers vary a lot), so your 2.5% is probably closer to reality. thanks for the correction!

    Sentiment: Hold

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