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Bank of America Corporation Message Board

whyduyouask 480 posts  |  Last Activity: 3 hours ago Member since: May 4, 2013
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  • "Yesterday, the Treasury Department announced new rules, effective immediately, to make tax “inversions” (translated: tax desertions) less profitable for American firms that seek to become foreign firms to lower their taxes. The new rules seem to be working, at least momentarily, judged by the drop in stock values of American companies that had been on the verge of deserting. But tax desertion is only the tip of a much larger iceberg of corporate tax avoidance. As Gabriel Zucman of the London School of Economics shows in a forthcoming paper, large American companies are now shifting 20 percent of their annual profits abroad. That’s a tenfold increase in tax evasion over the past fifteen years, accounting for seven of the ten percentage points by which corporations have reduced their effective tax rates on average from 30% to 20%.

    "When congressional Republicans (and a few Democrats) talk about “reforming” the tax code for corporations, they really mean cutting corporate taxes even further. The real answer is to tighten the law, close loopholes, and make corporations (and their executives and shareholders) pay their fair share for the benefits they receive of being American. And if they leave America, remove those benefits, including U.S. protection of their intellectual property and their foreign assets, as well as their "right" to lobby and influence American elections."

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "The war against Islamic extremism that began with George W. Bush’s invasion of Iraq in 2003 continues now with Barack Obama’s bombing of the co-called “Islamic State” in Syria. This has become an unending war, notwithstanding Obama’s attempts to withdraw from it. It is not against a particular enemy in a particular place, but against global thugs who use religion as cover for their barbarism. This war cannot be won. Bombs will not stop it.

    "But the barbarians can be contained if three conditions are met: (1) Their funding must be cut off. That’s where the United States should take a leadership role. (2) The major powers in the region (Iran, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey) must take primary responsibility for the war that has to be waged against the extremists. (3) The young people who are being recruited, dragooned, or bribed into joining the extremist thugs must be persuaded that better futures await them in their own societies if they choose otherwise. This may be the hardest challenge of all."

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • whyduyouask whyduyouask 8 hours ago Flag

    Please try to keep up with the news about the sucessful coalition of Arab countries Obama put together plus the use of French warplanes. Pretty good for a Community Organizer! Yep! President Obama is a hero.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    Who's the greedy one?

    by hacker_boob 9 hours ago
    whyduyouask whyduyouask 8 hours ago Flag

    And which one builds the roads we drive on? Now who is the greedy one?

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • whyduyouask whyduyouask 16 hours ago Flag

    China recently signed on to a Carbon Tax and has moved ahead of the USA in contributing to cleaning up the air and reducing CO2 production. They don't have a choice. The smog in Beijing is the worst in the world.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "As I travel around the country I've been visiting many public schools. My conclusion: We get what we measure. Now that test-taking has taken over our nation’s classrooms instead of the pursuit of knowledge and intelligence, we are training a generation of young people to take tests rather than to think. Yet the economy they will be entering does not reward the ability to take tests. It rewards the capacity to and identify and solve new problems."

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "Global leaders are meeting in New York today on climate change. What are the chances for a climate deal? The issue of climate change can't be separated from widening inequality. Global elites believe they can avoid its worst effects -- flooding, water shortages, food shortages, droughts. We'll get real change when they discover they can't."

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "I was interested in the recent report prepared by the World Bank, the United Nation’s labor agency, and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, showing that wages are flat or falling in all major economies -- as corporate profits claim an increasing share of productivity gains. The report calls for action by governments to boost consumption, raise wages, and strengthen safety nets. But this won't happen as long as large corporations and the wealthy are calling the shots. Capitalism is failing because democracies are failing. Reports like this are of limited use unless they also focus on getting big money out of politics. You agree?"

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    Why obama Stamp Isn't Sticking

    by hacker_boob Sep 21, 2014 8:50 AM
    whyduyouask whyduyouask Sep 21, 2014 9:10 AM Flag

    I should also add that there is no "Obama stamp". But the facts never seem to get in the way of your evil fantasies.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    Why obama Stamp Isn't Sticking

    by hacker_boob Sep 21, 2014 8:50 AM
    whyduyouask whyduyouask Sep 21, 2014 9:08 AM Flag

    Stamps are self adhesive now. You are a few years behind in your racism. Living in the past, even though it might make you feel comfortable will eventually make you look foolish.

    Oh, and no one ever spit on a stamp, they licked them. But then you realize that it would be saying something perverse about racists if you wrote that racists were licking Obama. See how your sick humor falls apart?

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "Individuals, groups, organizations, even nations, get into trouble when they avoid the work of tackling their most urgent problems. Here are the four biggest work-avoidance mechanisms. Don't let yourself or others succumb to them.
    1. Denial that a problem exists. Climate change, widening inequality, big money destroying democracy, or, on a personal level, an addiction. There are many others. Denial is potentially deadly.
    2. Escapism. The assumption it’s not my problem, and I and my family and friends won’t be affected. Poverty across town, lousy schools in the other town, family violence down the street, the Ebola virus in West Africa. We fool ourselves if we think we can escape the consequences.
    3. Scapegoating. The view “they’re” responsible – the poor, immigrants, blacks, Latinos, the government, foreigners, the rich. Blaming and stereotyping others is a coward’s way of failing to deal with a problem.
    4. Cynicism. The idea that nothing can be done. Government can’t work. Politics is inherently rotten. Our democracy is doomed. Our planet will perish. Cynicism is the most insidious work-avoidance mechanism of all."

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "Alibaba, the giant Chinese internet shopping mall, raised $21.8 b yesterday on its first day of trading. That's a new record. Big institutional investors -- including U.S. pension funds that may have your pension savings -- have rushed in to buy its shares. But Alibama’s management says it is not bound by U.S. securities regulations to provide timely, detailed financial statements in the future. And its management structure is less accountable to shareholders than would be acceptable in the United States. Founder Jack Ma and 28 partners can nominate a majority of directors. Under Chinese law, most board members can be insiders.
    I may be old-fashioned, but I don't think the pensions of average Americans should be invested in foreign corporations governed by a handful of insiders who aren’t even legally bound to disclose even the minimum required by U.S. securities laws. Do you? Alibaba may be a good company, but who knows? Remember the children’s story Alibaba and the Forty Thieves?"

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    Alibaba, absurd

    by mrdclark Sep 19, 2014 1:30 PM
    whyduyouask whyduyouask Sep 20, 2014 12:52 AM Flag

    Pity the turkeys who sold their BAC and bought Alibaba above $90.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • whyduyouask whyduyouask Sep 19, 2014 10:20 AM Flag

    Your use of a period where Americans use a comma indicates you are not an American. That said you are making a claim that is absurd because the price would be an insult. The main motivation of the decision by the Supreme Court was to move beyond the bungled election and to allow a decision, any decision, to be made. Finally, if you are from Cuba, as your ID implies, what do you know about open and fair elections anyway?

    My own opinion is that neither candidate in the election were qualified to be president. And after 8 years of the Bush administration, both candidates were still unqualified.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "When I spoke with Rand Paul several months ago he struck me as an opportunistic politician rather than someone with strong principles who’d say unpopular things. So I was impressed yesterday when he bucked most of his colleagues and voted against a bill to train and arm Syrian rebels. “Amid the interventionists’ disjointed and frankly incoherent rhetoric,” he said, “the only consistent theme is war. These barnacled enablers have never met a war they didn’t like.” Elizabeth Warren also voted against the bill. Do you think Hillary Clinton, were she still in the Senate, would vote against it?"

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • whyduyouask whyduyouask Sep 18, 2014 4:46 PM Flag

    You are a few years too late.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    Here comes the obamacare death panels

    by hacker_boob Sep 18, 2014 9:42 AM
    whyduyouask whyduyouask Sep 18, 2014 3:01 PM Flag

    Oh, good! You promise to die then?

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Tomorrow it will be even higher. Headed to over $18 near term. Over $19 by the end of the year.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "In an airport yesterday someone I didn’t know came up to me and asked “what are we going to do?” Maybe it’s because I’m rather conspicuous looking, but it’s been happening a lot more lately: Complete strangers approach me, and, as if we’re in the middle of a conversation, say “isn’t it awful?” and “what should we do?”
    I assume they’re referring to America – to the “recovery” that’s bypassed most people, to the capture of our democracy by big moneyed interests, to the chaos and barbarism abroad, and the cynicism and nastiness that’s taken over so much of our public debate.

    "If you were me, how would you respond? (I’ll tell you tomorrow how I've been responding.)"

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "Is the war against ISIS that we’re now entering an intentional distraction from domestic problems Republicans don’t want to deal with and Democrats would rather we disregard? Median household incomes are down over 8 percent from where they were in 2000, and still falling. The percent of working-age Americans in jobs is the lowest in over three decades. More of the nation’s income is going to corporate profits and less to wages than we’ve seen in over sixty years. Almost all the gains from economic growth are flowing to the top. Congress is so gridlocked it won’t raise the minimum wage (now 25% below its real value in 1968), or put people to work repairing our crumbling infrastructure, or raise taxes on the rich to pay for better schools for our kids.
    Yet all we’re hearing about is ISIS (or ISIL), our bombing raids, and whether we should send in more “advisors." In the late 1960s, when Lyndon Johnson’s “war on poverty” stalled, attention turned to Vietnam. In 2003, when George W. Bush couldn’t move his domestic agenda, he decided to invade Iraq. Is there a pattern here?"

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

BAC
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