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Bank of America Corporation Message Board

whyduyouask 125 posts  |  Last Activity: 4 hours ago Member since: May 4, 2013
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  • "Fred Ross, Sr., was probably the most influential (but little-known) community organizer in American history. It was Ross who first identified, recruited and trained Cesar Chavez to become a leader and an activist. Ross’s influence continues in the thousands of people whom he taught the tools of organizing and in the ideas found in this powerful little book, republished today as an e-book in English and Spanish. Ross’ son, Fred Ross, Jr.—also a terrific organizer—added a chapter to the e-book called "Organizing in the Internet Age," and included a short biography of his father. I added an introduction.

    "Ross organized people to challenge police brutality, fight segregation, and become politically powerful, teaching people how to channel their anger and frustrations into the creation of powerful grassroots organizations that could win concrete victories. He understood the central importance of discipline, hard work, and patience."

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "The biggest story of our era is the shift of power to large corporations and their top executives, Wall Street, and a handful of billionaires. There is no longer countervailing power in our system. Small businesses have morphed into franchises of giant corporations; local and state banks are now extensions of Wall Street; state and local political organizations have become funding arms of national parties; national parties themselves are being displaced by billionaire SuperPACS and secret 401-c-3 political front groups; trade unions are disappearing from the private sector and under siege in the public sector; and 65 percent of Americans are living paycheck to paycheck. If the presidential election of 2016 is to be about anything significant, it must be a rallying point for restoring economic and political power to the American people.

    "Do you agree? If so, what are you prepared to do?"

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • whyduyouask whyduyouask Sep 16, 2014 11:47 PM Flag

    Because their CB radio is broke?

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "I keep hearing Wall Street bankers say they’re worried about inflation. They should be worried about deflation. This morning’s report from the Labor Department showed the cost of living in the U.S. dropped in August for the first time in more than a year. Because of insipid domestic demand (America’s vast middle class isn't earning enough to buy much) and declining global demand (Europe is near recession and China is precarious), the prices of many goods and services are dropping. That sounds good but it’s a potential disaster because it could cause consumers to hold back even more, in anticipation of further drops -- pushing the economy into the kind of recession that’s very hard to remedy. Which means the Fed must continue to keep interest rates low, and Congress must give up its austerity economics. Repeat after me: There is no inflation."

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "General Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told members of Congress yesterday that he hasn't ruled out recommending U.S. ground forces attack ISIS if the current air campaign in Iraq fails. "If we reach the point where I believe our advisers should accompany Iraqi troops on attacks against specific ISIL targets, I will recommend that to the President," Dempsey said. Sources say the White House okayed Dempsey’s remark beforehand.

    "Translated: The President has promised for weeks that no combat troops would be sent to fight ISIS, but public opinion is shifting in light of the recent ghastly beheadings, and the military wants to move in. So Dempsey’s remark is a trial balloon. The war with ISIS is about to escalate, one way or another. History will show that George W. Bush’s toppling of Saddam Hussein unleashed the barbarians, and Obama couldn’t contain them. The job will ultimately fall to the next president, but how many more American lives will be lost?"

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • whyduyouask whyduyouask Sep 17, 2014 11:10 AM Flag

    Just like when the southern states seceded from the Union there was peace in the valley... for a while? Iraq was and is still unstable because of several reasons. It might be unstable 50 years from now. All unintended consequences. I'm sure George Bush meant well but as Colin Powell said, "You break it, you buy it."

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    Robert Reich 2014/9/17 What Inflation?

    by whyduyouask Sep 17, 2014 10:48 AM
    whyduyouask whyduyouask Sep 17, 2014 11:26 AM Flag

    Prices for homes, new or old, are way down from 2006. Massive deflation! I know several friends whose homes are still underwater but paying their mortgages in hopes of a little inflation. They had a short increase for the first six months of this year but have taken a 5% drop in the last three months. I don't drink milk or eat steak. But prices of milk and steak are tied to the drought in the midwest and western states and not to any economic policy. You are lying about your health insurance or else decided to not "insure" with one of those fake policies that cover nothing helpful. College tuition is a problem but the Republicans refuse to help out there. If your dollar is buying half of what it did ten years ago for you, you must not know how to do comparison shopping. Calling Reich an idiot is not a helpful rebuttal.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • whyduyouask whyduyouask Sep 17, 2014 11:30 AM Flag

    You don't present a very convincing argument. Saying it is all the fault of the liberals is too vague a charge to defend. And you don't supply any evidence beyond your imperfect memory of events.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "Nationhood doesn’t mean what it used to. Even if a majority of Scots decide to secede today, a separate Scotland will probably still use the same currency as England, remain part of the Eurozone (no visas or passports required to enter Scotland), and coordinate major policies with Parliament and Whitehall.

    "The only real beneficiaries will be large global corporations. They’ll have more bargaining leverage over a separate Scotland. Global corporations like separatism and “devolution” (a fancy term for pushing responsibility down to state, regional, or provincial governments) because both allow them to play governments against each other with ever bigger tax breaks, subsidies, and favorable regulations. In the United States, for example, states are in a frenzy of corporate gift-giving to attract and keep corporations and jobs.

    "What do you think?"

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "Is the war against ISIS that we’re now entering an intentional distraction from domestic problems Republicans don’t want to deal with and Democrats would rather we disregard? Median household incomes are down over 8 percent from where they were in 2000, and still falling. The percent of working-age Americans in jobs is the lowest in over three decades. More of the nation’s income is going to corporate profits and less to wages than we’ve seen in over sixty years. Almost all the gains from economic growth are flowing to the top. Congress is so gridlocked it won’t raise the minimum wage (now 25% below its real value in 1968), or put people to work repairing our crumbling infrastructure, or raise taxes on the rich to pay for better schools for our kids.
    Yet all we’re hearing about is ISIS (or ISIL), our bombing raids, and whether we should send in more “advisors." In the late 1960s, when Lyndon Johnson’s “war on poverty” stalled, attention turned to Vietnam. In 2003, when George W. Bush couldn’t move his domestic agenda, he decided to invade Iraq. Is there a pattern here?"

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "In an airport yesterday someone I didn’t know came up to me and asked “what are we going to do?” Maybe it’s because I’m rather conspicuous looking, but it’s been happening a lot more lately: Complete strangers approach me, and, as if we’re in the middle of a conversation, say “isn’t it awful?” and “what should we do?”
    I assume they’re referring to America – to the “recovery” that’s bypassed most people, to the capture of our democracy by big moneyed interests, to the chaos and barbarism abroad, and the cynicism and nastiness that’s taken over so much of our public debate.

    "If you were me, how would you respond? (I’ll tell you tomorrow how I've been responding.)"

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Tomorrow it will be even higher. Headed to over $18 near term. Over $19 by the end of the year.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    Here comes the obamacare death panels

    by hacker_boob Sep 18, 2014 9:42 AM
    whyduyouask whyduyouask Sep 18, 2014 3:01 PM Flag

    Oh, good! You promise to die then?

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • whyduyouask whyduyouask Sep 18, 2014 4:46 PM Flag

    You are a few years too late.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "When I spoke with Rand Paul several months ago he struck me as an opportunistic politician rather than someone with strong principles who’d say unpopular things. So I was impressed yesterday when he bucked most of his colleagues and voted against a bill to train and arm Syrian rebels. “Amid the interventionists’ disjointed and frankly incoherent rhetoric,” he said, “the only consistent theme is war. These barnacled enablers have never met a war they didn’t like.” Elizabeth Warren also voted against the bill. Do you think Hillary Clinton, were she still in the Senate, would vote against it?"

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • whyduyouask whyduyouask Sep 19, 2014 10:20 AM Flag

    Your use of a period where Americans use a comma indicates you are not an American. That said you are making a claim that is absurd because the price would be an insult. The main motivation of the decision by the Supreme Court was to move beyond the bungled election and to allow a decision, any decision, to be made. Finally, if you are from Cuba, as your ID implies, what do you know about open and fair elections anyway?

    My own opinion is that neither candidate in the election were qualified to be president. And after 8 years of the Bush administration, both candidates were still unqualified.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    Alibaba, absurd

    by mrdclark Sep 19, 2014 1:30 PM
    whyduyouask whyduyouask Sep 20, 2014 12:52 AM Flag

    Pity the turkeys who sold their BAC and bought Alibaba above $90.

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "Alibaba, the giant Chinese internet shopping mall, raised $21.8 b yesterday on its first day of trading. That's a new record. Big institutional investors -- including U.S. pension funds that may have your pension savings -- have rushed in to buy its shares. But Alibama’s management says it is not bound by U.S. securities regulations to provide timely, detailed financial statements in the future. And its management structure is less accountable to shareholders than would be acceptable in the United States. Founder Jack Ma and 28 partners can nominate a majority of directors. Under Chinese law, most board members can be insiders.
    I may be old-fashioned, but I don't think the pensions of average Americans should be invested in foreign corporations governed by a handful of insiders who aren’t even legally bound to disclose even the minimum required by U.S. securities laws. Do you? Alibaba may be a good company, but who knows? Remember the children’s story Alibaba and the Forty Thieves?"

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • "Individuals, groups, organizations, even nations, get into trouble when they avoid the work of tackling their most urgent problems. Here are the four biggest work-avoidance mechanisms. Don't let yourself or others succumb to them.
    1. Denial that a problem exists. Climate change, widening inequality, big money destroying democracy, or, on a personal level, an addiction. There are many others. Denial is potentially deadly.
    2. Escapism. The assumption it’s not my problem, and I and my family and friends won’t be affected. Poverty across town, lousy schools in the other town, family violence down the street, the Ebola virus in West Africa. We fool ourselves if we think we can escape the consequences.
    3. Scapegoating. The view “they’re” responsible – the poor, immigrants, blacks, Latinos, the government, foreigners, the rich. Blaming and stereotyping others is a coward’s way of failing to deal with a problem.
    4. Cynicism. The idea that nothing can be done. Government can’t work. Politics is inherently rotten. Our democracy is doomed. Our planet will perish. Cynicism is the most insidious work-avoidance mechanism of all."

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

  • Reply to

    Why obama Stamp Isn't Sticking

    by hacker_boob Sep 21, 2014 8:50 AM
    whyduyouask whyduyouask Sep 21, 2014 9:08 AM Flag

    Stamps are self adhesive now. You are a few years behind in your racism. Living in the past, even though it might make you feel comfortable will eventually make you look foolish.

    Oh, and no one ever spit on a stamp, they licked them. But then you realize that it would be saying something perverse about racists if you wrote that racists were licking Obama. See how your sick humor falls apart?

    Sentiment: Strong Buy

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