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Microsoft Corporation Message Board

wottowwottow 1721 posts  |  Last Activity: 12 hours ago Member since: Jul 2, 2006
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  • wottowwottow by wottowwottow Mar 29, 2014 3:17 PM Flag

    Google it.

    Quoting:

    "It is pretty simple. Microsoft fails miserably at its core business: providing a secure, reliable, user-friendly OS. So, why would anyone expect Microsoft to suddenly have competence in search. They were never good in search before. E.g. MSN.

    "Vista is the best example of Microsoft's view of revolutionary change: it was the most buggy OS ever. Then, they make you pay $200 to $400 to "end the misery" with Win7. But the funny part is Win7 is really Win Vista 2.0. Same old garbage."

  • Google it.

    Quoting:

    Analyst Gartner has just released its latest worldwide devices forecast, which shows, unsurprisingly, traditional PC shipments declining, and tablets, mobile phones, and ultramobiles (hybrid and clamshell) all growing. In total, device shipments are set to rise 6.9 percent, up from the 4.8 percent growth achieved last year.

    ....

    Worldwide Device Shipments by Operating System (Millions of Units)

    Operating System 2013 2014 2015
    Android 879.8 1,171.0 1,358.3
    Windows 325.1 339.1 379.3
    iOS/Mac OS 241.4 286.4 324.5
    Others 873.2 683.5 565.2

  • Reply to

    Windows' future is looking increasingly bleak

    by wottowwottow Mar 29, 2014 3:34 PM
    wottowwottow wottowwottow Mar 29, 2014 3:42 PM Flag

    I.e. the ratio (Android shipments)/(Windows shipments) is expected to grow from 2.7 to 3.58 by 2015.

  • Reply to

    Windows' future is looking increasingly bleak

    by wottowwottow Mar 29, 2014 3:34 PM
    wottowwottow wottowwottow Mar 29, 2014 5:19 PM Flag

    Quoting further:

    "Windows is still growing, but the future for the operating system doesn’t exactly look rosy. While businesses and power users will still turn to Microsoft’s brand for productivity purposes, casual users are looking elsewhere, and will continue to do so. Windows XP is set to come to its end of life very shortly, and you can bet far more of those migrating users will switch to Android devices than upgrade to Windows 8.x.

    "A few years ago, the suggestion that Windows could be so easily deposed from the top of the OS tree would have had you laughed out of town. Now, for the first time in twenty or so years, Microsoft is looking increasingly vulnerable in an area where it has dominated for so long. Chrome OS is not, as of yet, posing any real threat to Windows, but the fact it exists on products from the likes of Acer, HP, ASUS and LG, shows the potential for disruption.

    "These are tough times for Microsoft, and things look set to get even tougher in the coming years."

  • Reply to

    Why does Google suck so much

    by jeffbeck283 Mar 30, 2014 6:48 AM
    wottowwottow wottowwottow Mar 30, 2014 10:12 AM Flag

    Nobody bothers complaining about Bing because nobody bothers to try to use it.

  • Reply to

    math problem for the board scientist

    by cfuryurself Mar 29, 2014 8:52 PM
    wottowwottow wottowwottow Mar 30, 2014 11:15 AM Flag

    Let me guess. You've gone far out of your way to contrive a situation where "averaging" is applicable.

  • Reply to

    math problem for the board scientist

    by cfuryurself Mar 29, 2014 8:52 PM
    wottowwottow wottowwottow Mar 30, 2014 12:07 PM Flag

    Probably he will claim there is some abstract principle that has been vindicated.

    My take on the case in question here as that under the assumed conditions, averaging would let one arrive at an indirect educated guess at a quantity that is by hypothesis unknowable.

  • Google it.

    Quoting:

    "The post-Ballmer Microsoft is slowly taking shape now that Satya Nadella has become the company’s CEO. At the same time, though, those executives who were passed over for the CEO role and those who lost power in last year’s reorganization are starting to leave the company. The latest executive to depart, Re/Code reports today, is Antoine Leblond. A Microsoft spokesperson has confirmed to us that Leblond is, indeed, leaving the company.

    ....

    "Leblond was Microsoft’s Vice President for Windows Web Services, which put him in charge of quite a number of Microsoft products, including the Windows 8 store and the ecosystem around it, after previously working on Microsoft’s Office suite for a good 20 years. After Steven Sinofsky moved from the Office team to the Windows team to work in Windows 7, Leblond led the development of Office 2010. He then followed Sinofsky to the Windows group.

    "When Microsoft announced its large reorganization last year summer, many pundits were surprised that Leblond was nowhere to be found in the company’s leadership list.

    "After Sinofsky left Microsoft, Leblond was often the public face of Windows 8. With Microsoft’s BUILD developer conference kicking off on Wednesday, many expected him to reprise this role, so the timing of his departure was likely meant to preempt any speculation at BUILD."

    ______________________________________

    The fallout continues....

  • Google it.

    Quoting:

    "Finally, Microsoft’s flagship Office suite (Excel, PPT, Word) is available on one of its key rival’s mobile operating systems: Apple’s iOS. Nearly seven years after Steve Jobs unveiled the iPhone, Microsoft has finally built native products for Apple’s iOS to extend its popular, high revenue-generating Office suite to another platform. It begs the question: Why so long? The easy, quick, and snarky answer is to suggest that Microsoft finally surrendered to the new mobile platform gods — but, that would be too easy. Perhaps, under new leadership, the powers that be at Microsoft conceded that, when it comes to mobile, the Windows platform and Surface lines, despite passionate attempts from within, wouldn’t hold a candle to the current leaders in the mobile platform wars.

    "Today, in the fast-paced world of technology startups, Microsoft may be perceived to be “late,” but in the future, history may be much kinder. From Microsoft’s point of view, prematurely rolling out Office through iOS at a time when the company had already made hardware-level commitments to the Surface line as well as investments in the mobile Windows platform could have been seen as contradictory and potentially self-defeating. We can argue the merits of their strategy of trying to compete with iPad by bundling Office with the Surface (and other techniques), but that is the choice they made. Now, finally, with iOS and Android set as the main mobile operating platforms, it’s good to see Microsoft rolling out Office products for iOS, even if larges swathes of a generation have shifted over to Google Docs as a replacement of key Office functions (this could be the subject of an entirely separate post) or grown more attracted to new, native mobile document software offerings, such as Paper, Quip, and others.

    "It would be shortsighted to pick on Microsoft, so I’ll give them credit for making the changes it needed to make at the top (though there’s a long way to go) ..... "

  • wottowwottow wottowwottow Mar 31, 2014 10:07 AM Flag

    I seem to remember someone pointing out that companies that fall so far almost never come back.

    I know, what "someone" may have said isn't a convincing argument. What is more convincing is the mere absence of any reason to think Microsoft will come back. The present situation is not a step forward, it's the belated recognition of failure of Microsoft's basic strategy. Like the Titanic, Microsoft won't sink immediately, but there are no silver linings behind all the dark clouds.

  • Google it.

    Quoting:

    "NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- In one respect, you have to give Microsoft (MSFT_) credit. The company has rightfully #$%$ on Steve Ballmer's legacy.

    "At last week's Office for iPad event, Satya Nadella told us, even if indirectly, that everything Ballmer did at Microsoft in recent years was wrong. Yet, for some reason, the tech and financial media opts to portray Microsoft's new direction as a victory, that it's somehow doing Apple (AAPL_) a favor.

    "We miss Steve Jobs so much. We're so desperate to replace him that the first cerebral, reasonably attractive and well-spoken guy to come along gets to third base with us on the first date. We're so smitten we have lose sight of reality.

    ....

    "Nadella's on a search and rescue mission. Admirable, but it will produce the same sad ending had Ballmer remained in charge.

    "Microsoft's shift in strategy -- really the only way forward -- will render it as irrelevant as BlackBerry (BBRY_). It's a win-win for Apple as well as Google (GOOG_).

    "Nobody has an inside explanation of what happened under Ballmer. Or technical reasons for why it took so long for Office for iPad to happen. Ballmer failed. Miserably. And, despite the obvious fact that he has a clue (evident even if he didn't follow Ballmer), Nadella will as well. Because there's no way to succeed in the environment Ballmer placed Microsoft in. Nadella can't win playing the cards he was dealt. (It's no wonder nobody else wanted the job). "

    _________________________________________

    I tend to agree, I see no way he can succeed, though I wouldn't be quite so ready to pronounce it impossible.

  • Google it.

    Quoting:

    "Would I purchase the Microsoft MSFT +2.73% Surface? Not anymore. And I’m not sure that you should either.

    "I’m looking for a new laptop and the Surface has been one of the top contenders. I like it a lot. And although a slow seller for Microsoft it’s been gaining in popularity and many reviewers have given it high marks. It’s a powerful little laptop, lightweight with a Windows 8 touchscreen and a long battery life. Sure, it’s a little pricier than some of its competitors. But it’s also both tablet and laptop and integrates tightly with other Microsoft applications (like Office) so for a business user like me it seems worth it. It was on the top of my list. Until last week.

    "That was when the company’s new CEO, Satya Nadella, announced the launch of Office for the iPad. He emphasized the company’s focus on cloud and mobile for the future. “We think about users both as individuals and organizations spanning across all devices,” Nadella said during the launch event. And what he said effectively killed the Microsoft Surface. At least for me. And probably for you too."

  • Reply to

    Why The Microsoft Surface Just Died Last Week

    by wottowwottow Mar 31, 2014 1:57 PM
    wottowwottow wottowwottow Mar 31, 2014 2:15 PM Flag

    Beats me. Maybe because a keyboard can be attached to it?

  • Reply to

    Why The Microsoft Surface Just Died Last Week

    by wottowwottow Mar 31, 2014 1:57 PM
    wottowwottow wottowwottow Mar 31, 2014 2:23 PM Flag

    Quoting further:

    "Why? Two reasons.

    "For starters, the company has officially abandoned its “Windows First” policy. This is not just a strategy. It’s a complete change in perception and branding. No offense on Bill Gates, but he’s the old guard. And so is Steve Ballmer."

    ....

    "Secondly, and most importantly, Nadella is taking Microsoft back to the very root of what the company is: a maker of software. Nadella looks at the world around him and he sees devices...

    "The millions of little hardware components that will be talking to each other will not need operating systems like Windows. But they will need software to run them. And Microsoft, at its very core, is a software company."

  • Google it.

    Well worth reading in full. A much-needed sea change in computing is in the offing.

  • wottowwottow wottowwottow Mar 31, 2014 2:35 PM Flag

    Quoting, very briefly:

    "Carter Phillips, the lawyer for Alice Corp., warned that a decision against the patent could implicate "hundreds of thousands" of others. He noted that a brief submitted by IBM said such breakthrough applications as e-mail, web browsing and cellphones wouldn't qualify."

  • Google it.

    Quoting:

    "It's easy to find Android phones that can handle the Exchange-based email you often find in the workplace, but they don't always support all the latest features. That won't be a problem for much longer, though, as Microsoft has just revealed plans to bring Outlook Web App to Google's platform later this year. Much like its iOS counterpart from 2013, the Android release should let you take advantage of Office 365 technology that might not make it into third-party email software. The app may not be all that exciting by itself, but it could be the key to using your preferred phone for work instead of having to switch to company-approved hardware."

  • Reply to

    Why The Microsoft Surface Just Died Last Week

    by wottowwottow Mar 31, 2014 1:57 PM
    wottowwottow wottowwottow Mar 31, 2014 7:10 PM Flag

    "Big news, an apple lover doesn't like a Microsoft product."

    Are you really completely unable to read or think? He leads off by saying he LOVES the Surface. Or did, until Nadella's announcement.

  • Google it.

    Quoting:

    "Microsoft understands its real competition

    "The Mac vs PC debate is so last decade.

    "Today, it's Apple vs Android, and Microsoft is just an afterthought. Microsoft's goal is to "drive Office 365 everywhere" as Nadella said at the Office for iPad launch. As the software becomes platform agnostic, Microsoft will need to prove to customers that Office is worth the premium.

    "That means its real competition is Google, which famously gives away its best products like Google Docs. It's not just productivity software that Microsoft is competing with Google. They're also battling it out in cloud computing, web search, and mobile devices. Microsoft has decidedly lost the battle for the latter, despite hoarding its popular product for its own mobile OSes."

  • Reply to

    Why The Microsoft Surface Just Died Last Week

    by wottowwottow Mar 31, 2014 1:57 PM
    wottowwottow wottowwottow Apr 1, 2014 4:59 AM Flag

    I should have quoted a bit more:

    "Where does this leave the Microsoft Surface? In the dust. The whole appeal that justified the extra price for the Surface was that it was a Microsoft device running Windows and therefore would be a better device for Windows applications. But that argument was rendered moot by the company’s decision to write software like Office for the iPad and to focus on writing applications for all devices, whether they’re running Windows or not. Which means I don’t have to own Microsoft hardware."

    [Since the first time I read this, he corrected "mute" to "moot". Good for him.]

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