3 Tips for Getting the Bonus You Deserve

US News

Few things in life are as gratifying as being recognized for a job well done, especially when that recognition comes in the form of a little something extra in your pay envelope. There was a time when almost all companies willingly helped loyal employees to purchase those extra sugar plums around this time of the year. The list of those who still believe in doing so is ever shrinking, unfortunately.

If this practice is not a matter of policy where you work, it may be time to take things upon yourself to secure this increasingly rare pearl.

Consider these tactics in helping to deal with your own personal Grinch:

1. Ask for it. Sounds simple, doesn't it? But, hold on there, you. You can't simply burst into the Keeper of the Keys' office and demand recompense. You must approach them with tact, finesse, and most importantly, facts supporting your right to lay claim to an additional piece of the pie. Did you save the company coffers by implementing some new policy? Prove it. Has Sunday become a part of your regular workweek? Let's see evidence. Did new clients drop their old companies to do business with you personally? What are their names and why did they choose to do so? Facts are not facts to the unknowing without suitable documentation to back them up.

2. Be willing to compromise. The key to any successful negotiation is the willingness to give a little to gain a little. Be realistic about what you feel you deserve based on what your boss may be able to give. If the economy has not been kind to your business, your willingness to work within whatever restricted confines this may have created will certainly net you a more positive outcome. Should monetary compensation be out of the question, settle for a few extra days off around the holidays or use of the company sky box to entertain visiting family and friends. Perhaps request an extra ticket that allows your significant other to accompany you the next time business travel finds you headed for some exotic locale.

3. Do not resort to threats. They rarely work and may have you eating your own words to save face. Like your mother always said, "You attract more bees with honey than with vinegar." If you truly feel that the absence of a bonus will compel you to look elsewhere for employment, keep it to yourself. Laying out your hand in such a way may force you to play it. Is it really worth losing your current position over? If it is, there may be bigger issues you are facing than this deficit, perceived or otherwise.

In addition, a recent Glassdoor survey shows that among the most wanted holiday perks this year from employers, employees most want a cash bonus (73 percent of those surveyed), followed by a salary raise (60 percent), then paid time off (36 percent).

Whatever comes of your personal wish-list success, keep in mind that it's never too early to start working on next year's bonus.

Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter is a Glassdoor career and workplace expert, chief career writer and partner with CareerTrend, and is one of only 28 Master Resume Writers (MRW) globally. Jacqui and her husband, "Sailor Rob," host a lively careers-focused blog at http://careertrend.net/blog. Jacqui is a power Twitter user (@ValueIntoWords), listed on several "Best People to Follow" lists for job seekers.



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