Number 1 Ranked Forbes/Starmine Analyst Picks His Top Stock Ratings In The Semiconductor Sector; Recent Iphone Integration And Low Investor Interest Cited As Reasons For Ratings

67 WALL STREET, New York - January 25, 2012 - The Wall Street Transcript has just published its Wireless Communications & Telecom Report offering a timely review of the sector to serious investors and industry executives. This special feature contains expert industry commentary through in-depth interviews with public company CEOs, Equity Analysts and Money Managers. The full issue is available by calling (212) 952-7433 or via The Wall Street Transcript Online.

Topics covered: 4G LTE and 3G Infrastructure Upgrades - Wireless Carriers Compete for Spectrum - Smartphone Operating Systems - Emerging Markets Growth Shifts to Data ARPU

Companies include: TriQuint Semiconductor (TQNT); U.S. Cellular (USM); AT&Ts (T); America Movil (AMX); Apple (AAPL); and many more.

In the following brief excerpt from the Wireless Communications And Telecom Report, expert analysts discuss the outlook for the sector and for investors.

Craig Berger is a Managing Director in the technology, media and telecom equity research group of FBR Capital Markets Corp., covering the semiconductor components sector. Mr. Berger was named Forbes' number one blue chip semiconductor Analyst for 2010, number two in 2009, and he was named StarMine's number one semiconductor-earnings forecaster for 2010 and number three in 2009. Mr. Berger holds a BBA and an MPA from The University of Texas at Austin.

TWST: What is your coverage in the wireless space?

Mr. Berger: I cover a broad swath of semiconductor companies, including some in the communication semiconductor space. The companies I cover most exposed to cellular would be Qualcomm (QCOM), Broadcom (BRCM), Marvell (MRVL), and then you have NVIDIA (NVDA) and Texas Instruments (TXN) playing there a bit. Some of the other companies are exposed in other ways. For example, Atmel (ATML) sells touch controllers, Maxim (MXIM) sells power management chips, etc.

TWST: Who is best positioned right now?

Mr. Berger: Qualcomm is having a record and blowout year, and they are benefiting from a lot of smartphone business. Within the smartphone vendor space, you certainly have winners and losers. The losers have been RIM (RIMM) and Nokia (NOK). The winners have been Apple (AAPL) and Samsung (005930.KS), and to a lesser extent HTC (2498.TW), although HTC now looks like they may be turning from a winner into a loser based on headwinds.

That's on the device side.On the communications equipment side, Cisco (CSCO) has clearly had some challenges. Juniper (JNPR) has had some challenges, and that's probably because privately owned Chinese company Huawei is massive and huge and impacting the established guys of communications equipments businesses. So not everybody is doing well, not everybody is doing poorly. It's a mixed bag. On the chip side, we see winners in Qualcomm, Broadcom, NetLogic (NETL), Cavium (CAVM), LSI, Maxim and others.

TWST: Is 4G significant for the chip companies?

Mr. Berger: It's going to be significant to the cellular baseband providers, so Qualcomm, Broadcom, Intel (INTC)  / Infineon (AFX.DE), STMicro (STM) and to a lesser extent Marvell. These are the companies that produce the main processor in the cell phone. This is called the baseband processor, so 4G is a significant shift because it has much faster upload and download speeds. You can transfer many more of bits and bytes of data over the cellular networks. Qualcomm stands to be the largest beneficiary within chips. You could see other folks benefit as well, specifically STMicro has a decent 4G solution, Intel/Infineon is working on it pretty hard, Broadcom is working on it, and then you could see some of the smaller radio frequency chip guys, some of the R.F. and power amplifier chip vendors benefit from 4G as you need more radios in each phone. Some of those companies could include Skyworks (SWKS), RF Micro Device (RFMD), TriQuint Semiconductor (TQNT), RDA Micro (RDA) or others.

TWST: Is this a good place to invest right now?

Mr. Berger: Qualcomm is a great wireless-chip firm to be exposed to right now. They have a strong franchise. They've got technology leadership in 4G. Obviously they have got patent and royalty income on every 3G and 4G device sold in the world. They also make chips for 3G and 4G phones, and they are ramping Apple iPhone and iPad devices, and that has been a bit of an incremental driver. Qualcomm didn't have the iPhone before, and they are now supplying into those devices, so that's a big slug of business that turned on for them in 2H11. Another wireless- and networking-exposed firm I really like right now is Broadcom. This stock has been highly unloved. It has been under significant pressure; it seems to have stabilized over the last month. But I think fundamentals are set to improve as you get into the middle of the year, and this stock is pretty widely hated among investors, so that's a good time to be buying because there is no froth embedded in the stock yet.

The Wall Street Transcript is a unique service for investors and industry researchers - providing fresh commentary and insight through verbatim interviews with CEOs and research analysts. This special issue is available by calling (212) 952-7433 or via The Wall Street Transcript Online.

The Wall Street Transcript does not endorse the views of any interviewees nor does it make stock recommendations.

For Information on subscribing to The Wall Street Transcript, please call 800/246-7673

  • 10 Worst Jobs for the Future, 2016
    Business
    Kiplinger.com

    10 Worst Jobs for the Future, 2016

    Thinkstock The labor market is steadily improving, with U.S. unemployment at its lowest level since 2008, yet some occupations continue to experience a downward slide. Careers in the manufacturing sector, for example, have been disappearing for decades as plants become more efficient and jobs move to factories overseas. Other careers are falling victim to changing tastes and changing technologies. To help job seekers avoid some of these dying professions, we analyzed 784 popular occupations, looking at which have been shedding positions over the past decade and which are projected to continue that trend into the next decade. We considered salaries, too, and favored promising careers that require

  • Hiker's dramatic video of two snakes fighting reveals rare sight
    Science
    CNET

    Hiker's dramatic video of two snakes fighting reveals rare sight

    Most hikers would hightail it upon spotting two snakes fighting on a path. Arkansas hiker Dawn Kelly decided to record the snakes on her smartphone instead, creating the kind of video most of us would rather watch from a safe distance. The unusual thing about this snake battle royale, however, isn't that Kelly managed to record it unscathed, but that the two snakes, a copperhead and a cottonmouth, shouldn't have been fighting at all. According to Alabama Auburn University herpetologist David Steen, male snakes often fight in something called a "combat dance" over female snakes. But until now, no one has recorded evidence of two different species of male snakes fighting, according to the BBC.

  • Star Wars Death Star's famed feature was a complete accident
    Entertainment
    CNET

    Star Wars Death Star's famed feature was a complete accident

    Most of us make mistakes like scraping our car misjudging the Starbucks drive-thru. When Colin Cantwell makes a mistake, legends are born. Cantwell, 84, was a concept artist and spacecraft designer on the original "Star Wars" film, at the time called "The Star Wars." That's certainly not all he's done, but for some sci-fi fans, that alone would be enough. In a Reddit Ask Me Anything on Tuesday, Cantwell discussed his contributions to space and sci-fi history, including a certain Death Star trench that turned out to be a happy accident for the Rebel Alliance. "George Lucas gave me the project of designing a 'Death Star,'" Cantwell wrote on Reddit. "I didn't originally plan for the Death Star to

  • How new technology could replace millions of call center jobs in the Philippines
    Business
    Newsweek

    How new technology could replace millions of call center jobs in the Philippines

    You need help with your bank account or advice about your mortgage. You call the help line. And then, after a lengthy wait, tapping more information into your phone and being transferred to the right department, you reach a call center worker, an actual human being. By that point, however, you might not be feeling warm and patient. Usually, the person absorbing your frustration is in the Philippines—the call center capital of the world. (For years, India had more call center workers than any other nation, but more recently U.S. companies began relocating to the Philippines, where people speak American English, rather than the British variety.) The country is 12 or 13 hours ahead of Eastern Standard

  • Business
    U.S.News & World Report

    8 Ways to Tell If You're in the Middle Class

    Are you considered part of the middle class? Here are eight tests to determine if you're still middle class. If your family of three earns between $41,869 and $125,609 a year, you're in the middle class, according to a 2015 Pew Research Center analysis.

  • Vanguard PRIMECAP Fund: An Active Fund Endorsed by an Index Fund King -- The Motley Fool
    Business
    The Motley Fool

    Vanguard PRIMECAP Fund: An Active Fund Endorsed by an Index Fund King -- The Motley Fool

    In 1984, Vanguard's founder, John Bogle, seeded the Vanguard PRIMECAP Fund with $100,000 of his own money. Over the following three decades, the actively managed Vanguard PRIMECAP Fund would turn his original investment into more than $5.5 million, or twice what it would have become if it were invested in the S&P 500. Its record of topping the market's return has persisted to this day. The Vanguard PRIMECAP Fund beat the S&P 500 by an average of three percentage points per year over the last 15 years with its stockpickers' simple strategy of buying out-of-favor growth companies and holding them for a decade, if not longer.  The recipe is simple: PRIMECAP hopes to identify companies that have

  • 'I interviewed over 100 people at Goldman Sachs, and this was the biggest mistake job candidates made'
    GS
    Business Insider

    'I interviewed over 100 people at Goldman Sachs, and this was the biggest mistake job candidates made'

    Before cofounding Solemates, a brand of women’s shoe-care products, in 2009, Becca Brown worked at Goldman Sachs for almost six years. Brown, who has a bachelor’s from Harvard University and an MBA from Columbia, spent a lot of time interviewing job candidates at Goldman, where she held various roles, including analyst, wealth adviser, and chief of staff. “I interviewed anywhere from 20 to 30 job candidates a year.

  • News
    ConsumerReports

    Winterize Your Lawnmower in 2 Easy Steps

    When storing your lawnmower for the winter, Consumer Reports' experts say these two tips are must-dos to ensure your mower will be up and running when you need it in the spring.

  • Behind the life and death of a star money manager accused of insider trading
    News
    Business Insider

    Behind the life and death of a star money manager accused of insider trading

    About a year before Sanjay Valvani's wife found him dead inside his Brooklyn Heights home, the star money manager learned he was under investigation for insider trading. Valvani drove profits at Visium Asset Management, an $8 billion New York hedge fund that had been on the rise.

  • In Lawsuit, More Young Women Accuse Trump of Being a Sexist Pig
    Sports
    The Fiscal Times

    In Lawsuit, More Young Women Accuse Trump of Being a Sexist Pig

    Donald Trump’s tactically dubious decision to continue his attacks on a former Miss Universe over her weight gain following a disastrous performance in the first presidential debate have caused the question of his treatment of women to flare up yet again. The latest flare-up apparently prompted the Los Angeles Times to go digging through depositions filed as part of a class action lawsuit against a Trump golf club in California in 2012, where reporters unearthed multiple examples of former Trump employees testifying that Trump had, both personally and through the atmosphere he created at his property, engaged in extremely sexist behavior toward women, some of them quite young, who worked for him. The lawsuit, Messerschmidt v. Trump National Golf Club, was not actually about sexual discrimination or mistreatment, but about work hours.

  • American Airlines' new uniforms causing hives, headaches
    Business
    Chicago Business Journal

    American Airlines' new uniforms causing hives, headaches

    With great fanfare, American Airlines introduced new uniforms on Sept. 20. Now the outfits are giving the world's largest carrier and hundreds of its employees real headaches. Really. Sources report that more than 400 AA flight attendants have informed their union and company management that they have broken out in hives and begun to experience itching and headaches since they first slipped into the new uniforms — the first new designs for many in the airline's employee ranks in decades. An AA spokeswoman confirmed that the company has received complaints about the new uniforms, which the company, at this juncture, believes may be related to a wool allergy among some affected employees The spokeswoman

  • Wealth of people in their 30s has 'halved in a decade'
    News
    BBC News

    Wealth of people in their 30s has 'halved in a decade'

    Today's 30-something generation has missed out on house price increases and better pensions, according to research by the Institute for Fiscal Studies. The think tank found that people born in the early 1980s were the first post-war group not to have higher incomes in early adulthood than those born in the preceding decade. This generation's comparatively lower financial wealth was down to a combination of lower home-ownership rates, less access to final salary-type pension schemes, and stagnant wages, experts said. The IFS included in its definition of "wealth" property owned, financial assets like savings, and wealth held in private pensions - minus any debts a person may have such as student loans or credit cards.

  • Jack Bogle on the retirement crisis, Wells Fargo's crackup, and 'Hamilton'
    Business
    The Street

    Jack Bogle on the retirement crisis, Wells Fargo's crackup, and 'Hamilton'

    PHILADELPHIA -- Jack Bogle, the founder of Vanguard, fired off last year about the presidential race, saying "Donald Trump and I are kind of antithetical." Bogle wrote a book called Enough, about how readers should consider financial success in light of larger personal success. Meanwhile, Never Enough is the title of a biography of Donald Trump by Michael D'Antonio. But at this year's Bogleheads meetup -- a gathering of Bogle admirers who get together to talk about index funds and visit the Vanguard headquarters -- "the T-word" was banned as a topic by the moderators. (And a few attendees wore pins saying "Jack Bogle for President" -- a prize from a prior Bogleheads meetup.) Jack Bogle still

  • Why California’s New Retirement Savings Plan May Become a National Model
    Business
    Money

    Why California’s New Retirement Savings Plan May Become a National Model

    A new state retirement saving plan has just been launched in California, which could help millions of workers—both in the state and around the country. California Gov. Jerry Brown on Thursday will sign a bill that establishes a state retirement savings plan called Secure Choice. The launch of an auto-IRA by California, the largest state, adds major momentum to a burgeoning movement to improve retirement security for workers without 401(k)s or other employer plans.

  • U.S. to OPEC: Don’t Drill, Baby, Don’t Drill
    Business
    Foreign Policy Magazine

    U.S. to OPEC: Don’t Drill, Baby, Don’t Drill

    OPEC, the dysfunctional cartel that has gifted case studies in the “prisoner’s dilemma” to business schools for years, unveiled an agreement to potentially cap oil production this year in what amounts to a last-ditch effort to shore up the price of crude after a costly two-year nosedive. If implemented — and all the details must still be worked out — such a cap on production could nudge crude prices higher. Since the OPEC oil embargo and gas lines of the early 1970s, the United States has tried to convince Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, Russia, and other big producers to keep the taps open so that oil remains abundant and affordable.

  • Report: DirecTV parent AT&T to phase out satellites in 3 to 5 years
    Technology
    Denver Business Journal

    Report: DirecTV parent AT&T to phase out satellites in 3 to 5 years

    AT&T Inc. – which is expected to premier its streaming service DirecTV Now later this year – reportedly will work to make streaming its primary TV platform by 2020. AT&T last year acquired satellite-TV service DirecTV, which has a large Colorado footprint. Under the timeline, as reported by Bloomberg, DirecTV set-top boxes and satellite dishes could be obsolete in three to five years. Bloomberg cites people familiar with the plans. Dallas-based AT&T (NYSE: T) has claimed no allegiance to satellite TV technology from day one of its $48.5 billion acquisition of DirecTV, but it hasn’t publicly provided any definitive answers or a timeline on a migration of its 25 million video subscribers toward

  • News
    Associated Press Videos

    Witness: Train Engineer Slumped Over

    An eyewitness to the commuter train crash in Hoboken Thursday morning says he saw the train's engineer slouched over the engine cab. (Sept. 29)

  • Ex-Fox anchor's doctor backs sexual harassment claims against Ailes
    Business
    Reuters

    Ex-Fox anchor's doctor backs sexual harassment claims against Ailes

    An ex-Fox News anchor told her therapist that former network chairman Roger Ailes sexually harassed her, two years before she went public with the allegations that the company said she made up, a document filed in court on Wednesday said. Lawyers for Andrea Tantaros filed a statement in New York state court in Manhattan from the therapist, who said Tantaros spoke to her about the harassment in 2014. Tantaros sued Ailes and Fox News, a unit of Twenty-First Century Fox Inc in August.

  • What Donald Trump Doesn’t Understand About Nuclear Weapons
    Politics
    The Fiscal Times

    What Donald Trump Doesn’t Understand About Nuclear Weapons

    Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton didn’t agree on much during their acerbic debate faceoff earlier this week, but one of the topics on which they found common ground was nuclear weapons. Then he went on to criticize America’s nuclear capabilities compared to those of Russia. What Trump saw “the other night” might have been a 60 Minutes report last Sunday that suggested the risk of nuclear conflict was rising as Vladimir Putin’s Russia looks west, sees weakness and thinks that in a conflict with NATO, a nuclear strike might shock the alliance into submission.

  • Cramer: The negative effect that Deutsche Bank will have on your money
    DBK.DE
    CNBC

    Cramer: The negative effect that Deutsche Bank will have on your money

    With the price of oil up, Jim Cramer expected Thursday to be a great day for the market. Instead, worries over Deutsche Bank (XETRA: DBK-DE), the biggest bank in Germany, had ripple effects all over the world. "So if a company like Deutsche Bank may be having real problems, and that's sure how it looks with the stock down 6.7 percent today, then several things are going to play out, and none of them are good," Cramer said.

  • Robert Shiller: There's ‘always reason to worry’ about a coming collapse in housing
    Business
    Seana Smith

    Robert Shiller: There's ‘always reason to worry’ about a coming collapse in housing

    US home price gains slowed slighting in July, as many on Wall Street are speculating that the Federal Reserve will raise rates before the end of the year. The recent surge in real estate demand has pushed home prices near their pre-crisis peak in 2006, which is making it increasingly difficult for new home buyers to enter the market. Home sales fell 0.9% in August from the previous month, according to the National Association of Realtors.

  • TM
    Reuters

    Toyota drops diesel from new model, signals likely phase-out

    By Laurence Frost PARIS (Reuters) - Toyota has decided to drop diesel engines from its new C-HR compact in the wake of Volkswagen's emissions scandal and will probably do the same for future model renewals, the carmaker's second-ranking global executive said on Thursday. The Japanese automaker decided "within the last six to 12 months" not to offer a diesel version of the car, unveiled at the Paris auto show, because demand for the powertrain technology is falling sharply, Executive Vice President Didier Leroy told Reuters in an interview. If faced with a renewal decision today for other models up to and including the larger Auris compact, a Toyota staple, "we would probably do the same thing", Leroy added.

  • Boeing nears wide-body jet sale to Qatar Airways: sources
    Business
    Reuters

    Boeing nears wide-body jet sale to Qatar Airways: sources

    Qatar Airways is in the process of firming up the order, which it was due to have placed at July's Farnborough airshow, but which was delayed by the Qatari government in an effort to speed up U.S. approval for the fighter contract, one of the sources said. Bloomberg reported that the deal was for at least 30 Boeing 777 and 787 jets, valued at about $6.7 billion at list prices. Boeing declined to comment and Qatar Airways was not immediately available to comment.

  • Sephora Is Launching Their Most Beautiful Class Yet
    Business
    InStyle

    Sephora Is Launching Their Most Beautiful Class Yet

    As if we didn't already have enough reasons to love Sephora (seriously, we could never name them all), the beauty retailer is doing something really incredible for women who are embarking on a major life transition. Putting a philanthropic spin on the beauty education they've been serving up in stores across the country, Sephora will launch what they are calling Classes for Confidence.

  • U.S. lawmakers may change September 11 law after rejecting veto
    Politics
    Reuters

    U.S. lawmakers may change September 11 law after rejecting veto

    By Patricia Zengerle and Richard Cowan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. lawmakers expressed doubts on Thursday about Sept. 11 legislation they forced on President Barack Obama, saying the new law allowing lawsuits against Saudi Arabia could be narrowed to ease concerns about its effect on Americans abroad. A day after a rare overwhelming rejection of a presidential veto, the first during Obama's eight years in the White House, the Republican leaders of the Senate and House of Representatives opened the door to fixing the law as they blamed the Democratic president for not consulting them adequately.