Energy provider NiSource's 2Q profit climbs 6 pct.

MERRILLVILLE, Ind. (AP) -- NiSource Inc.'s second-quarter earnings climbed 6 percent, as the energy provider's gas distribution business piped more revenue into its balance sheet.

The Merrillville, Ind., company said Wednesday that it earned $72.1 million, or 23 cents per share, in the three months that ended June 30. That compares to net income of $68.3 million, or 25 cents per share, in last year's quarter, when it had fewer outstanding shares.

Revenue, before removing the cost of sales, climbed 17 percent to $1.2 billion.

Analysts surveyed by FactSet expected, on average, earnings of 23 cents per share on $1.07 billion in revenue.

NiSource runs a natural gas transmission, storage and distribution business, and it also generates and distributes electricity. Its companies deliver energy to about 3.8 million customers in an area that stretches from the Gulf Coast through the Midwest to New England.

Revenue from the company's gas distribution business jumped 36 percent to $395 million in the quarter, to become its largest source of revenue. The company said gas transportation and storage and electric revenue also climbed.

Operating expenses also climbed more than 10 percent to $666.4 million, as operation and maintenance costs jumped.

NiSource reaffirmed its forecast for adjusted, full-year earnings of $1.50 to $1.60 per share.

The average of analysts' expectations falls in the middle of that range, at $1.55 per share.

  • Politics

    You'll Be Shocked That Most People Don't Know These 4 Things About Social Security -- The Motley Fool

    Social Security is one of the most important social program for seniors in retirement. Research from Gallup suggests that almost 60% of current retirees rely on Social Security income to comprise a major part of their monthly income, while another 30% rely on Social Security as a minor income source. In theory, 90% of today's retirees could be in some degree of financial trouble if they didn't have Social Security in their corner. But the honest truth is that most people -- especially those who've yet to retire -- aren't well versed on the ins and outs of Social Security. When it comes to Social Security, ignorance is far from bliss, as ignorance to the program's rules could wind up costing you

    The Motley Fool
  • Business

    3 Great Reasons to Sell General Electric Company -- The Motley Fool

    Between divesting its massive financial services business, investing heavily to expand its digital offerings, and working to transform itself into a highly focused industrial company, General Electric (NYSE:GE) is in the process of reinventing itself for the 21st century. Along this journey, General Electric has several notable opportunities it can tap into for growth. However, tapping into new growth may not necessarily translate into a higher stock price. After all, GE is a massive company and it takes a lot to move the needle. At the same time, the company is dealing with a sluggish and volatile global growth environment that's inhibiting its ability to drive revenue growth. Finally, there's

    The Motley Fool
  • Business

    ‘Rich Dad’ author Robert Kiyosaki: If you’re investing for the long term, ‘you’re crazy’

    Robert Kiyosaki, author of several best-selling books including “Rich Dad Poor Dad,” joined MarketWatch for a live interview on Facebook today. He offered up insights on making money, becoming an entrepreneur and even touched on politics. Here are some highlights from the talk, or you can listen to the full interview here. His advice on how to get rich: “The rich do not work for money. Most people do not understand that, because they’re taught to go to school and get a job for money. The rich don’t work for money. And one of the reasons for that is money is no longer money. One of the reasons for that is in 1971, President Nixon took the U.S. Dollar off the gold standard and basically screwed

    MarketWatch
  • Technology

    Are AT&T's and Verizon's no-overage policies really a good deal?

    Nobody likes getting socked with a charge for going over a monthly wireless data cap. And thanks to changes made by the nation's two largest carriers, those days may be over forever. Earlier this summer AT&T and Verizon said they'd eliminate charges for customers who bust their data caps, in exchange for slowing service to 2G speeds. It's a policy competitors T-Mobile and Sprint have offered for years. And it's likely to be a welcome change for many customers, who cringe every month when the phone bill arrives. But are the two big carriers really offering a good deal? In this edition of Ask Maggie, I help answer that question. Dear Maggie, I have two teenagers on my Verizon family plan, and they

    CNET
  • Business

    Is a U.S. depression possible?

    J.P. Morgan Global Market Strategist Gabriela Santos and Shaffer Asset Management CEO Dan Shaffer on the markets, Federal Reserve and the U.S. economy.

    Fox Business Videos
  • Business

    Warren Buffett Bought 3 Million More Shares of This Oil Company: Here's Why -- The Motley Fool

    Berkshire Hathaway, Inc. (NYSE:BRK-A) (NYSE:BRK-B) bought 3.2 million more shares of Phillips 66 (NYSE:PSX), according to the company's most recent SEC filing. That puts Berkshire's total holding at nearly 79 million shares, good for a 15% stake in the refining and petrochemicals giant. In only a few years' time Phillips 66 has become one of Berkshire Hathaway's biggest holdings, worth $6.1 billion at recent share prices.  So what does Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett  like so much about Phillips 66? In short, it's got a lot of the characteristics that Buffett looks for in a company, and they're the kinds of things that have typically meant fantastic long-term returns for Buffett and Berkshire's

    The Motley Fool
  • Business

    Billionaire George Soros' Fund Dumped These 3 Biotech Holdings. Should You? -- The Motley Fool

    George Soros is widely considered one of the greatest hedge fund managers of all time, and for good reason. During his tenure at the Quantum Fund, Soros reportedly generated average returns in excess of 30% per year, crushing the broader markets in the process.  As such, his namesake fund, Soros Fund Management, remains one of the most closely watched hedge funds in the world, despite his retirement in 2015. And the fact that the Soros Fund has over $4.6 billion under management means it can have a real impact on the market, giving investors all the more reason to keep tabs on its quarterly buys and sells.  Biotech investors in particular may want to dig deeper into the fund's quarterly transactions

    The Motley Fool
  • Business

    14 Things You Really Should Know About 401(k) Retirement Plans -- The Motley Fool

    Americans have a bounty of investment tools to choose from when preparing for retirement, but no investment vehicle is more popular in the United States than the employer-sponsored 401(k). As of 2010, based on data released by the Federal Reserve in 2013, there were 88.7 million workers in the U.S. participating in a 401(k) with roughly $4.5 trillion in assets being managed by mid-2013. The data also shows that more than 638,000 different 401(k) plans were being offered. As America's preferred retirement plan, it's important that you understand the ins and outs of what makes the 401(k) tick, because you retirement could very well depend on it. With this in mind, here are 14 things you should

    The Motley Fool
  • Business

    This negative 3.5% 'buy the market' signal has been a moneymaker 81% of the time

    In the history of the stock market, some of the best buying opportunities occurred after sharp sell-offs, with some of the single best days following the single worst days. Adviser Investments’ Daniel Wiener reviewed the performance of the S&P 500 (^GSPC) — via the Vanguard 500 Index Fund (VFINX) — to see how the stock market did in the year following one-day sell-offs of 3.5% or more.

    Sam Ro
  • Entertainment

    The colonel's secret recipe revealed? Not so fast, says KFC

    Has Colonel Sanders' nephew inadvertently revealed to the world the secret blend of 11 herbs and spices behind KFC's fried chicken empire? The company says the recipe published in the Chicago Tribune is not authentic. It all started when a reporter visited with Joe Ledington, a nephew of Kentucky Fried Chicken founder Colonel Harland David Sanders.

    Associated Press
  • News

    US wants to force lower speeds on truck and bus drivers

    Whatever the speed limit, drivers would be physically prevented from exceeding it. The proposal, which comes from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, does not force older heavy vehicles to add the speed-limiting technology, but the regulators are still considering it. While the news is being welcomed by some safety advocates and non-professional drivers, many truckers said that such changes could lead to dangerous scenarios where they are traveling at much lower speeds than everyone else.

    Associated Press
  • Politics

    Obamacare Price Hikes Could Cost Democrats Control of the Senate

    The odds remain fairly good that the Democrats can regain control of the Senate in November, especially if Democratic presidential nominee continues her strong showing against Republican businessman Donald Trump in the polls. Four other races -- including veteran Republican Sen. John McCain’s reelection effort in Arizona -- are deemed competitive by political experts. Despite years of Republican vows to dismantle and replace the Affordable Care Act, Obamacare has received relatively little attention in the presidential and congressional races until now.

    The Fiscal Times
  • World

    The Latest: 6 bodies found in past 2 days in quake-hit town

    A spokesman for firefighters says that rescue workers have found six bodies over the past two days from the rubble of Amatrice, the hardest hit of three towns struck by the recent earthquake in Italy. Luca Cari says three of those bodies have been recovered and three others are stuck in a place that is hard for workers to safely reach and that it will still take more time to recover them. Firefighters are entering earthquake-damaged homes in Italy to retrieve a few items cherished by their owners, hoping it will give comfort to those who have lost homes and loved ones.

    Associated Press
  • Politics

    German economy minister says EU-US trade talks have failed

    Free trade talks between the European Union and the United States have failed, Germany's economy minister said Sunday, citing a lack of progress on any of the major sections of the long-running negotiations. Both Washington and Brussels have pushed for a deal by the end of the year, despite strong misgivings among some EU member states over the Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, or TTIP. Sigmar Gabriel, who is also Germany's vice chancellor, compared the TTIP negotiations unfavorably with a free trade deal forged between the 28-nation EU and Canada, which he said was fairer for both sides.

    Associated Press
  • Business

    As Apple’s ‘death cross’ turns 1, the stock heads toward a ‘golden cross’

    Apple Inc. detractors can celebrate on Friday the first anniversary of the stock’s “death cross,” only the second time in the stock’s 36-year history that the bearish chart pattern has persisted for that long. Although the current bearish technical period is on track to end within two weeks, the Apple bulls shouldn’t be too quick to celebrate. The only other time Apple’s 50-day moving average stayed below its 200-day moving average for at least a year—from Oct. 9, 1995, to Nov. 21, 1996—the ensuing bullish “golden cross” lasted less than two months, and prices resumed their tumble almost immediately. The stock’s AAPL, -0.59%  50-day moving average, which technical analysts use to track the shorter-term

    MarketWatch
  • Business

    Icahn may have sought to sell Herbalife shares before buying new ones: Sources

    Carl Icahn bought more than two-million additional Herbalife shares late on Friday, but according to sources the billionaire investor may have been interested in exiting his Herbalife position earlier in August—but only for the right price. Sources tell CNBC that two financial firms, Jeffries and UBS, were working independently to find a buyer for Icahn's massive stake in the nutritional supplement company, but no buyers ever emerged. These sources also said that, as recently as late last week, Icahn was bid for a large block of his Herbalife position but chose not to sell. In addition, Icahn never offered his shares, they added. It's also possible that Icahn, a well-known poker enthusiast, was

    CNBC.com
  • News

    2 United pilots suspected of being drunk arrested in Glasgow

    Two United Airlines pilots who have been arrested for suspected intoxication before they were to fly 141 passengers from Scotland to the United States will appear in a Scottish court Monday, police said. The Police Service of Scotland said it arrested both pilots Saturday at Glasgow Airport and both men, aged 45 and 35, would be arraigned at a court in Paisley, a Glasgow suburb, to face charges connected to Britain's transport safety laws. United Airlines said Saturday's flight from Glasgow to the U.S. city of Newark, New Jersey, was delayed for 10 hours while the airline sought replacement pilots.

    Associated Press
  • Business

    St. Louis Fed President: U.S. Has Weathered Global Risks

    James Bullard, president of the St. Louis Federal Reserve Bank, spoke to WSJ Federal Reserve reporter Harriet Torry in Jackson Hole about the the pending decision to raise interest rates and how the United States economy has weathered global risk over the past year.

    WSJ Live
  • Entertainment

    'Don't Breathe' scores, ousts 'Suicide Squad' at box office

    LOS ANGELES (AP) -- The horror movie "Don't Breathe" has reason to let out a big sigh of relief. Audiences turned out in droves for the late summer thriller, which brought in $26.1 million, according to studio estimates released Sunday

    Associated Press
  • GM

    Lyft says self-driving cars won't replace drivers' jobs, but they might make carpooling awkward

    Imagine hailing a Lyft car through the app and a driverless car comes to pick you up. "When [self-driving car technology] becomes available and more widely adopted, I think that’ll work for Lyft Line and I think that’ll work for Lyft," Rob Farmer, a Lyft product manager, told Business Insider.

    Business Insider
  • Entertainment

    Israeli tech group Shellanoo plans Tel Aviv IPO

    Israeli technology company Shellanoo is planning to raise at least 100 million shekels ($26.5 million) in an initial public offering (IPO) on the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange in late September or October, it said on Sunday. Shellanoo, founded in 2014 and whose backers include Russian billionaire Roman Abramovich and popstars will.i.am and Nicki Minaj, focuses on mobile applications, online services and interactive artificial intelligence. By staying local, Shellanoo is bucking a trend of Israeli technology companies choosing to list on foreign markets such as Nasdaq.

    Reuters
  • Business

    Couple files lawsuit to bring dozen cats into remodeled home

    A Buncombe County couple is going to court to get permission to keep the 12 cats they refer to as their "tribe" in their refurbished home. The Asheville Citizen-Times reports (http://avlne.ws/2btgiek) Debra and Harry Stonecipher haven't moved into the 6,700 square foot house they recently renovated, and won't until Baby, Dante, Duchess and the nine other indoor cats can come with them.

    Associated Press
  • Business

    Panera CEO on self-respect, and why he often avoids gluten

    Panera founder and CEO Ron Shaich considers himself the "discoverer-in-chief," meaning he's in charge of ensuring the bakery chain's image doesn't grow stale. Panera says the efforts are paying off, with sales up 2.3 percent at established locations for the latest quarter.

    Associated Press
  • Business

    Egypt's PM consulted on wheat policy decision - ministry

    CAIRO (Reuters) - An official at Egypt's agriculture ministry said on Sunday the prime minister had been consulted on the latest decision to return to a zero tolerance policy towards ergot, a common grain fungus, in imported wheat. "The

    Reuters
  • Business

    Love Dividends? 2 Stocks You Might Want to Buy -- The Motley Fool

    Are you looking to spice up your portfolio with some dividends? If you're not, think again. There are very good reasons to love dividend stocks, including the income stream they provide investors, the fact that these income streams often grow over time, and the additional possibility of principal appreciation. But finding the right dividend stocks isn't always easy. After all, a high dividend yield doesn't automatically translate into an excellent dividend stock. To make things easier, here are two income-investment ideas for you to consider: McDonald's (NYSE:MCD) and Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL). Profiting from fast food McDonald's fits the definition of a solid dividend stock, and it's just about as

    The Motley Fool