Incoming College Students Can Have Their Acceptances Rescinded If They're Caught Drinking

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While most high school students know that they're expected to maintain their grades even after they've been accepted to college, there is a lesser known reason why some colleges rescind students' admission.

As several college newspapers have reported in the past few years, colleges sometimes revoke a student's acceptance if they're caught drinking during a campus visit. Colleges say they treat underage on-campus drinking from an accepted student they same way they would one who is enrolled.

We first heard about these policies from George Washington University student newspaper The Hatchet, who publishes a guide for accepted students visiting campus during the university's Colonial Inauguration during June. The Hatchet warns that if any students on campus for CI are caught with alcohol, "they'll be sent to GW's disciplinary office just like any other student."

As one GWU administrator told The Hatchet, "When a student makes a decision to illegally consume alcohol or use illegal drugs ... it calls into question the types of choices the student will make around substance use when they come to campus in the fall."

In a June 2012 article on college-bound students, Duke student newspaper The Chronicle cites a study on overnight college visits that found that 16% of prospective students drank alcohol during their visit, 17% engaged in sexual activities, and 5% used drugs other than alcohol.

According to The Chronicle, Duke makes prospective students spending the night on-campus sign a consent form prohibiting the underage possession and consumption of alcohol and other illegal drugs.

"Teens need to understand the choices they might be faced with and their consequences," one of the study's authors told The Chronicle. "What is their response going to be, and how are they going to make the decision they want to make?"



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