The Kids Food and Beverage Market in the U.S., 7th Edition

PR Newswire

LONDON, May 6, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportbuyer.com has added a new market research report:

The Kids Food and Beverage Market in the U.S., 7th Edition 

http://www.reportbuyer.com/countries/north_america/usa/kids_food_beverage_market_u_s_7th_editionn.html

To put the market for kids' food and beverage in context, Packaged Facts estimates that retail sales of all food and beverages in the U.S. will reach $639 billion in 2013 with kids' food and beverages accounting for roughly 3.5% of sales. In 2013, Packaged Facts estimates total value of kids' food and beverage to be worth $23.2 billion.

While kids' market can be quite complex, Packaged Facts has focused on seven core food and beverage categories in which marketers have a strong tendency to target kids: dairy products, snacks, frozen food, beverages, cereal, shelf-stable meals, and produce. Importantly, growth of kids' food and beverage appears to be outpacing that of the total market, up 4.4% from 2012-2013 compared to 2.9% of traditional food and beverages in the same categories. This is why makers and marketers of packaged goods are turning to America's youngest consumers to boost sales. Moreover, the kids' food market is still in its infancy—providing additional incentive for players to innovate new product lines that can be adapted to kids' needs and desires.

However, marketing kids' food and beverages can be a tricky business. While kids' food and beverages are targeting the child user, companies and brands must first gain acceptance by the purchaser—the parent. Obtaining parent approval is most often achieved through healthy brand positioning and socially responsible efforts. The Millennial parent—who likes to have products tailored specifically for them—emerges as a willing consumer when it comes to products that are made specifically for kids. Millennial moms are identified as an important target for industry players to consider when developing social media marketing strategies.

Innovation in kids' food and beverage products is largely accomplished through formulation, packaging, and marketing. Formulation is a key component for innovation of any food or beverage designed for kids. Kid-friendly formulations leverage color, shape and size to appeal to kids' senses without pushing the taste boundaries too far beyond the familiar. Additionally, new formulations of kids' foods often strive to meet nutritional requirements to appease parents. Packaging trends tap into three key attributes—convenience; portion control; and playability.

Finally, industry players must tread carefully when targeting kids. Public health professionals concerned about the unhealthy diets and lifestyles that lead to childhood obesity have identified food marketing to children as playing a key role in this national crisis.

Packaged Facts projects sales of kids' food and beverage will grow to a value of $29.8 billion by 2018, driven by continued economic recovery, strong new product development, and increased demand for health and wellness products suitable for growing kids.

Scope and Methodology

The kids food and beverage market is a broad and complex one, spanning numerous categories and product segments. Packaged Facts qualifies a food as being for kids when it has a taste kids love; nutrition kids need; or entertainment kids crave. Taste alone is not sufficient to quality a product as being for kids. The product must meet at least one other criterion—nutrition or entertainment. This is accomplished through product formulation, packaging, and marketing. Ideally the product possesses all three of these characteristics.

Kids' foods are merchandised throughout the retail and foodservice landscapes. Retail venues include club stores, convenience stores, dollar stores, drug stores, health/natural foods stores, mass merchandisers, mainstream supermarkets, and specialty stores that carry a limited assortment of a unique mix of foods and beverages (i.e., Trader Joe's, Fox & Obel, etc.), as well as the Internet. Though kids' food and beverages are sold through nontraditional retail venues and foodservice channels, this report excludes these outlets when quantifying the market size.

Packaged Facts has based its market size on seven food and beverage categories in which marketers have a strong tendency to target kids. These categories include dairy products, snacks, frozen food, beverages, cereal, shelf-stable meals, and produce. Packaged Fact provides both quantitative and qualitative analysis of kids' food and beverage based on both public and syndicated data sources.

Primary data sources include:

IRI sales tracking through U.S. supermarkets and grocery stores, drugstores, and mass merchandisers (including Target and Kmart, but excluding Walmart) with annual sales of $2 million or more.
U.S. Census Bureau retail food sales data from the Economic Census surveys, annual retail channel sales.
U.S. Bureau of Economic analysis annual estimates for consumer spending on food.
Major food and beverage company and retailer annual reports.
Information on new product introductions was derived from examination of the retail milieu and from relevant trade, business, and government sources, including company literature and annual reports. The consumer demographics analysis was developed using data from primary data are Simmons National Consumer Surveys Spring 2013 from Experian Marketing Services. The report also draws on a proprietary Packaged Facts national online consumer survey conducted in February/March of 2013.
Chapter 1: Executive Summary
Market definition
Channels covered
Kid population factors
Figure 1-1: U.S. Child Population by Age Group, 2012
The parent demographic—25-44 year olds
Figure 1-2: U.S. Households by Presence of Children, 2000-2012
The grandparent factor
The Millennial mom
Race and ethnic influence
Table 1-1: U.S. Child Population by Age Group and Race/Ethnicity, 2012 (in thousands)
Hispanics: The power of family
Figure 1-3: U.S. Households by Presence of Children and Hispanic origin, 2012
The obesity epidemic has immediate and long-term impact on market
Industry labeling initiatives
Total retail kids food and beverage sales at $23 billion in 2013
Table 1-2: U.S. Retail Sales of Kids Foods and Beverages,
2009-2013 (in billions of dollars and percent change)
Figure 1-4: U.S. Retail Sales of Kids Foods and Beverages, 2009-2013 (in billions of dollars)
Kids' food and beverage performs well in key categories
Table 1-3: Overview of IRI FDMx-Tracked Kids Food and Beverage Sales in Selected Categories, 2013(in billions of dollars and percent)
Sales of kids' food and beverage to approach $30 billion by 2018
Table 1-4: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Kids' Food and Beverages, 2013-2018 (in billions of dollars and percent)
Figure 1-5: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Kids' Food and Beverages, 2013-2018 (in billions of dollars)
Market opportunities
Marketers: Kids Dairy Products
Marketers: Kids Snacks
Marketers: Kids Frozen Foods
Marketers: Kids Beverages
Marketers: Kids Cereal
Marketers: Kids Shelf-Stable Meals
Marketers: Kids Produce
Marketers: Foodservice
Marketers must tread carefully when targeting kids
Marketing strategies
Innovative formulation creates kid appeal
Where consumers shop for food
Table 1-5: Type of Store(s) Shopped on Most Recent Grocery Shopping Trip, 2013 (in percent of grocery shoppers)
Technology is changing how consumers shop for groceries
Kids influence parents' grocery choices
Figure 1-6: Agreement with Statement, "My Kids Plan an Important
Role in the Groceries I Choose", 2013
Moms are more likely to consult kids when making food purchases
Kids have more influence in Hispanic households
Older kids are more likely to help make purchase decisions
Move over breakfast, parents say lunch is the most important meal
Table 1-6: Parents' Attitudes toward Meals, by Presence of Children in Household by Age, 2013 (index)
Parents with young kids are most influenced by coupons and nutrition
Parents find advertising helpful when choosing kids' products
Parents don't like kids' pestering, but find it hard to resist
Chapter 2: Market Context
Highlights
Scope of Kids' Food and Beverage Market
Methodology: Making the cut
Channels covered
Factors to Market Growth
Shifts in the U.S. Population
Table 2-1: U.S. Population by Age Group, 2010 and 2012(in thousands)
Static child population limits market opportunity
Figure 2-1: U.S. Child Population by Age Group, 2012
The parent demographic—25-44 year olds
Figure 2-2: U.S. Households by Presence of Children, 2000-2012
The grandparent factor
The Millennial mom
Race and ethnic influence
Figure 2-3: U.S. Population by Race/Ethnicity, 2012
Table 2-2: U.S. Child Population by Age Group and Race/Ethnicity, 2012 (in thousands)
Asians: The healthy consumer
Hispanics: The power of family
Figure 2-4: U.S. Households by Presence of Children and Hispanicorigin, 2012
Macroeconomic Factors
Decline in household income provides impetus for thrifty shopping habits
Figure 2-5: U.S. Median Household Income, 2007-2012 (inflation-adjusted dollars)
Increasing rates of unemployment contributor to lower household income
Figure 2-6: U.S. Unemployment and Underemployment, 2007-2013
Consumer confidence plays a role in purchase decisions
Figure 2-7: Consumer Confidence, 2007-2013
The Health Factor
The obesity epidemic has immediate and long-term impact on market
Short-term effects
Long-term threat: Continuing the cycle
Government intervention for prevention of obesity
Let's Move! campaign
Let's Move! makes an impact…
…but there's more to be done
The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act
Nutrition labeling and education to aide consumer decisions
Industry initiatives
Nutrition Keys
Figure 2-8: Nutrition Keys
Clear on Calories
Figure 2-9: Clear on Calories
Nu-Val
Figure 2-10: Nu-Val Nutritional Scoring
Nestlé Nutritional Compass
Figure 2-11: Nestlé Nutritional Compass
Foodservice labeling requirements improve nutritional transparency
Figure 2-12: McDonald's Menu Board, 2012
The kids' menu
Chapter 3: Market Size and Growth
Highlights
Industry Context
Total retail kids food and beverage sales at $23 billion in 2013
Table 3-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Kids Foods and Beverages,2009-2013 (in billions of dollars and percent change)
Figure 3-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Kids Foods and Beverages,2009-2013 (in billions of dollars)
Kids' food and beverage performs well in key categories
Table 3-2: Overview of IRI FDMx-Tracked Kids Food and Beverage Sales in Selected Categories, 2013(in billions of dollars and percent)
Room for growth
Sales of kids' food and beverage to approach $30 billion by 2018
Table 3-3: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Kids' Food and Beverages, 2013-2018 (in billions of dollars and percent)
Figure 3-2: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Kids' Food and Beverages, 2013-2018 (in billions of dollars)
Market Composition
Dairy products and snacks capture largest share of kids' food sales
Table 3-4: IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales of Kids' Food and Beverages by Category, 2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 3-3: IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales of Kids' Food and Beverages by Category Share, 2013
Snacks and produce offer strongest growth in market
Table 3-5: IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales of Kids' Food and Beverages
by Category, 2009-2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 3-4: IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales of Kids' Food and Beverages by Percent Growth 2009-2013
Kids' dairy products gain momentum
Table 3-6: IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales of Kids' Dairy Products,2009-2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 3-5: IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales of Kids' Dairy Products,2009-2013 (in millions of dollars)
Yogurt dominates kids' dairy product category
Figure 3-6: U.S. Sales of Kids' Dairy Products by Segment Share,2013
Kids' snacks get boost through health and wellness positioning
Table 3-7: IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales of Kids' Snacks, 2009-2013(in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 3-7: IRI FDMX-tracked Sales of Kids' Snacks, 2009-2013(in millions of dollars)
Kids' snacks fairly evenly divided between four segments
Figure 3-8: U.S. Sales of Kids' Snacks by Segment Share, 2013
Families appreciate the convenience of frozen foods
Table 3-8: IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales of Kids' Frozen Foods, 2009-2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 3-9: IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales of Kids' Frozen Foods, 2009-2013 (in millions of dollars)
Breakfast food commands largest share of kids' frozen food sales
Figure 3-10: U.S. Sales of Kids' Frozen Foods by Segment Share,2013
Kids' beverages sales slow and steady
Table 3-9: IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales of Kids' Beverages,2009-2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 3-11: IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales of Kids' Beverages,2009-2013 (in millions of dollars)
Aseptic juices—a.k.a. juice boxes—are iconic kid beverage
Figure 3-12: U.S. Sales of Kids' Beverages by Segment Share, 2013
Kids' cereal suffers from high-sugar association
Table 3-10: IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales of Kids' Cereal, 2009-2013(in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 3-13: IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales of Kids' Cereal, 2009-2013(in millions of dollars)
Cold cereal captures majority of kids' cereal sales
Figure 3-14: Sales of Kids' Cereal by Segment Share, 2013
Shapes define kids' shelf-stable meals
Table 3-11: IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales of Kids' Shelf-Stable Meals, 2009-2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 3-15: IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales of Kids' Shelf-Stable Meals, 2009-2013 (in millions of dollars)
Canned meals capture 80% of the shelf-stable kids' meal category
Figure 3-16: U.S. Sales of Kids' Shelf-Stable Meals by Segment Share, 2013
Package innovation provides boost to kids' produce sales
Table 3-12: U.S. Sales of Kids' Produce, 2009-2013(in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 3-17: IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales of Kids' Produce,2009-2013 (in millions of dollars)
Shelf-stable fruits account for the majority of produce sales
Figure 3-18: U.S. Sales of Kids' Cereal by Segment Share, 2013
Market Opportunities
Made by mom = made with love…
Kidfresh
Figure 3-19: Kidfresh Super Duper Chicken Nuggets, 2013
Table 3-13: Kidfresh Category Performance in IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales, 2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Mom Made
Figure 3-20: Mom Made Bites, 2013
Table 3-14: Mom Made Food LLC Category Performance in IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales, 2013 (in dollars and percent)
…marketed with love
Chapter 4: The Marketers
Highlights
Selection criteria
Marketers: Kids Dairy Products
Overview
Dannon succeeds with smoothies
Table 4-1: Dannon Category Performance in IRI FDMx-Tracked
Sales, 2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 4-1: Dannon Danimals, 2013
Chobani capitalizes on health positioning of Greek yogurt
Table 4-2: Chobani Category Performance in IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales, 2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 4-2: Chobani Champions Tubes, 2013
Marketers: Kids Snacks
Overview
General Mills—Master of the character licensed fruit snacks
Table 4-3: General Mills Inc. Company Category Performance in IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales, 2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 4-3: General Mills Mott's Medleys Fruit Snacks, 2013
Annie's takes a healthful approach to kids' snacks
Table 4-4: Annie's Inc. Category Performance in IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales, 2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 4-4: Annie's Homegrown Cheddar Squares, 2013
Clif Kid offers parents a nutritional and eco-friendly snack choice
Table 4-5: Clif Bar & Company Category Performance in IRI
FDMx-Tracked Sales, 2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 4-5: Clif Kid Zbar Monster Chocolate Mint, 2013
Plum Kids infiltrating the kids' snack category
Table 4-6: Plum Inc. Category Performance in IRI FDMx-Tracked Sales, 2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 4-6: Plum Kids Grammy Sammy, 2013
Marketers: Kids Frozen Foods
Overview
Kellogg's Eggo offers convenience and playability
Figure 4-7: Eggo Wafflers, 2013
Figure 4-8: Eggo Drizzlers, 2013
Table 4-7: Kellogg's Co. Category Performance in IRI FDMx-
Tracked Sales, 2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Smucker's makes PB&J more convenient
Table 4-8: JM Smucker Co. Category Performance in IRI
FDMx-Tracked Sales, 2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 4-9: Smucker's Uncrustables Reduced Sugar, 2013
Marketers: Kids Beverages
Overview
Campbell Soup leverages stealth health by integrating veggies into juice
Table 4-9: Campbell Soup Co. Category Performance in IRI
FDMx-Tracked Sales, 2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 4-10: V8 Fusion Refreshers, 2013
Nestlé Juicy Juice Fruitifuls exhibit strong growth
Table 4-10: Nestlé USA Inc. Category Performance in IRI FDMx-
Tracked Sales, 2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 4-11: Juicy Juice Fruitifuls, 2013
Marketers: Kids Cereal
Overview
Kellogg's comes full circle with Rice Krispies Treats brand
Table 4-11: Kellogg Co. Category Performance in IRI FDMx-
Tracked Sales, 2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 4-12: Kellogg's Rice Krispies Treats Cereal, 2013
Marketers: Kids Shelf-Stable Meals
Overview
Annie's continues to expand product lines and brand awareness
Table 4-12: Annie's Inc. Category Performance in IRI FDMx-
Tracked Sales, 2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 4-13: Annie's Homegrown, 2013
Campbell maintains kids' soup sales by rotating character licenses
Table 4-13: Campbell Soup Co. Category Performance in IRI
FDMx-Tracked Sales, 2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 4-14: Campbell's Fun Favorites Soup Ad, 2013
Marketers: Kids Produce
Overview
Plum Kids Organics first mover in stand-up pouch packaging
Table 4-14: Plum Inc. Category Performance in IRI FDMx-
Tracked Sales, 2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 4-15: Plum Kids MashUps, 2013
GoGo Squeez takes pouch packaging mainstream
Table 4-15: Materne North America Category Performance in IRI
FDMx-Tracked Sales, 2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 4-16: Materne GoGo Squeez, 2013
Nature's Child combines packaging with character licensing
Table 4-16: Maverick Brands Category Performance in IRI FDMx-
Tracked Sales, 2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)
Figure 4-17: Nature's Child, 2013
Marketers: Foodservice
Overview
McDonald's and the Happy Meal
Figure 4-18: McDonald's Happy Meal Homepage, November 2013
Chapter 5: Marketing and New Product Trends
Highlights
Marketing to Kids: Challenges Exist
Marketers must tread carefully when targeting kids
Marketing label claims
Labeling allergens
Fat content
Locally produced
Organic
No added hormones
Omega-3 fatty acids
Healthy
Natural
Marketing Strategies
Appealing to parents
Marketing strategy: Good nutrition
Plum Organics
Figure 5-1: Plum Kids Facebook, September 27, 2013
Figure 5-2: Plum Organics, 2013
Marketing strategy: Healthy lifestyles
Capri Sun
Figure 5-3: Capri Sun, 2013
Marketing strategy: Cause marketing
General Mills: Box Tops for Education
Nestlé Juicy Juice: Fruit for All
Figure 5-4: Nestlé Juicy, Juice Fruit for All, 2012
Target: Give with Target
Figure 5-5: Target, Give with Target, 2013
Connecting with the Millennial mom
Marketing strategy: Blog power
Happy Family
Figure 5-6: Mom Blog, Happy Family, 2013
New Product Trends
Innovative formulation creates kid appeal
Bite-sized perfect for kids
Figure 5-7: Earth's Best Kidz Baked Popcorn Chicken
Figure 5-8: Fresh & Easy Goodness Kettle Corn
Color has impact
Figure 5-9: Yoplait Trix
Shapes are fun
Figure 5-10: Perdue Fun Shapes
Figure 5-11: Popsicle featuring Hello Kitty
Nutrition kids need
Figure 5-12: Mueller's Hidden Veggie Pasta, Advertisement
Figure 5-13: Clif Kid
Figure 5-14: Vito CoCo Kids
Packaging leverages convenience, portion control, and playability
Convenience
Figure 5-15: Nature's Child Pudd'n Pouches
Figure 5-16: Lunchables Uploaded
Portion control
Figure 5-17: Fiber One Chewy Kids
Playability
Figure 5-18: Plum Kids Slam Dunx
Figure 5-19: YoCrunch Back to School Packaging, 2013
Kids' foods: It's all in the marketing
Character merchandising
Figure 5-20: Earth's Best and Sesame Street
Figure 5-21: Pirate Booty and SpongeBob, Sweepstakes 2013
Figure 5-22: Kraft Macaroni & Cheese featuring Monsters Inc.
Cause marketing
Figure 5-23: Horizon Organic DHA Omega-3
Chapter 6: The Retail Marketplace
Highlights
Retail Overview
Table 6-1: Sales of Food at Home and Food Away from Home, 2000-2011 (in billions)
Figure 6-1: Sales of Food at Home and Food Away from Home, 2000-2011
Figure 6-2: Sales of Food at Home and Food Away from Home by Share, 2011
Top food store retailers
Table 6-2: Top 20 U.S. Food Store Retailers, 2013 (in billions)
Table 6-3: U.S. Food Store Sales by Leading Retailers, 2000-2011 (percent)
Retail merger and acquisition activity
Where consumers shop for food
Table 6-4: Type of Store(s) Shopped on Most Recent Grocery Shopping Trip, 2013 (in percent of grocery shoppers)
Technology is changing how consumers shop for groceries
Handheld scanners in retail stores
Will digital coupons replace paper?
Retailers: Food at Home
Overview
Table 6-5: Food Sales by Retail Segment, 2000-201 (in billions)
Figure 6-3: Food Sales by Retail Segment Share, 2000-2011
Traditional food retailers
Table 6-6: Traditional Food Retailers by Outlet Type, 2000-2011(in billions)
Figure 6-4: Traditional Food Retailers by Outlet Type, 2011
Slow growth in food sales at grocery outlets
Figure 6-5: Grocery Store Sales Growths, 2000-2011
Convenience stores expanding food mix to compete with grocery
Specialty stores: Small but mighty
Nontraditional retailers
Table 6-7: Nontraditional Food Sales by Outlet Type, 2000-2011(in billions)
Figure 6-6: Nontraditional Food Retailers by Outlet Type, 2011
Supercenters replacing mass merchandisers
Dollar stores contributing to growth of other nontraditional food retailers
Non-store retailers
Table 6-8: Non-store Food Sales by Outlet Type, 2000-2011(in billions)
Figure 6-7: Non-store Food Retailers by Outlet Type, 2011
Kids' food and beverage opportunity: Home delivery and mail order
Retailers: Food Away from Home
Overview
Table 6-9: Food Sales by Foodservice Segment, 2000-2011 (in billions)
Figure 6-8: Foodservice Sales by Retail Segment Share, 2011
Full-service restaurants have a narrow lead in restaurant sales
Table 6-10: Restaurant Sales by Segment, 2000-2011 (in billions)
Restaurant operators must answer the demand for health on the kids' menu
Figure 6-10: What's Hot 2013 Chef Survey, 2013
Chapter 7: The Consumer
Note on Simmons Data
Highlights
Purchase Decisions
Food products are leading category purchased
Opportunity:
Table 7-1: Purchase Decisions, 2013 (percent of U.S. adults who purchased an item in the listed category in the last 12 months)
Kids influence parents' grocery choices
Figure 7-1: Agreement with Statement, "My Kids Plan an Important Role in the Groceries I Choose", 2013
Kids as joint decision makers for food purchases
Table 7-2: Joint Food Purchase Decision with Kids in Household, 2006-2013 (percent of U.S. adults who purchased food products in the last 12 months based on a joint decision with children in household)
Moms are more likely to consult kids when making food purchases
Table 7-3: Joint Food Purchase Decision with Kids in Household, by Gender and Mom Status, 2013
Kids have more influence in Hispanic households
Figure 7-2: U.S. Hispanic Households with Children, by Age of Children, 2012
Table 7-4: Joint Food Purchase Decision with Kids in Household, by Hispanic Origin, 2013
Older kids are more likely to help make purchase decisions
Figure 7-3: Yoplait Pro-Force
Table 7-5: Joint Food Purchase Decision with Kids in Household, by Presence of Children in Household by Age, 2013 (index)
Parents' Attitudes toward Food
Move over breakfast, parents say lunch is the most important meal
Table 7-6: Parents' Attitudes toward Meals, by Presence of Children in Household by Age, 2013 (index)
Parents with young kids are most influenced by coupons and nutrition
Table 7-7: Parents' Attitudes toward Food Purchases, by Presence of Children in Household by Age, 2013 (index)
Parents' Attitude toward Advertising
Parents find advertising helpful when choosing kids' products
Table 7-8: Parents' Attitudes toward Advertising, by Presence of Children in Household by Age, 2013 (index)
Older demographics show most concern for advertising to kids
Table 7-9: Advertising to Children is Wrong, by Age, 2013
Moms influenced by kids' food product advertising
Table 7-10: Advertising is Helpful in Choosing Products to Buy for Children, by Gender and Mom Status, 2013
Hispanics find advertising helpful in choosing kids' products
Table 7-11: Advertising is Helpful in Choosing Products to Buy for Children, by Select Demographics, 2013
Parents' Attitude toward Shopping with Kids
Parents don't like kids' pestering, but find it hard to resist
Table 7-12: Parents' Attitudes toward Shopping with Kids, by Presence of Children in Household by Age, 2013 (index)
Moms have a hard time saying "no"
Table 7-13: Hard to Resist Children's Requests for Non-essential
Purchases, by Gender and Mom Status, 2013
Pester power is more effective on Hispanic parents
Table 7-14: Hard to Resist Children's Requests for Non-essential Purchases, by Hispanic Origin, 2013
Kids wield significant power in brand choice
Table 7-15: Parents' Attitudes toward Shopping with Kids, by Presence of Children in Household by Age, 2013 (index)
Moms let kids choose brand
Table 7-16: Children Have Significant Impact on Brands Chosen,
by Gender and Mom Status, 2013
Hispanics' kids drive brand choice
Table 7-17: Children Have Significant Impact on Brands Chosen,by Hispanic Origin, 2013


Read the full report:
The Kids Food and Beverage Market in the U.S., 7th Edition 

http://www.reportbuyer.com/countries/north_america/usa/kids_food_beverage_market_u_s_7th_editionn.html

For more information:
Sarah Smith
Research Advisor at Reportbuyer.com
Email: query@reportbuyer.com
Tel: +44 208 816 85 48
Website: www.reportbuyer.com

Rates

View Comments (0)