Leading Accounting Firm Gettry MarcusShares Advice on How to Evaluate Last Year's Tax Return for Future Tax Savings

Leading forensic accounting firm Gettry Marcus CPA, P.C.shares information on how to evaluate a 2013 tax return for future tax savings.

PR Newswire

WOODBURY, N.Y., May 28, 2014 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- Leading tax and forensic accounting firmGettry Marcus CPA, P.C. shares advice onhow to review tax returns for 2014 tax savings. With the April 15th filing season deadline now behind us, it's not too early to turn your attention to next year's deadline for filing a2014 return. That refocus requires, among other things, an awareness of the direct impact that many "ordinary," as well as one-time, transactions and events will have on the tax you will eventually be obligated to pay on April 15, 2015. To gain this forward-looking perspective, taking a moment to look back at the filing season that has just ended is particularly worthwhile. Your 2013 Form 1040.Examining your 2013 Form 1040 individual tax return can help you identify certain changes that you might want to consider this year and continue with what you're doing right. These "key ingredients" to your 2014 return may include, among many others considerations, a fresh look at:

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Your refund or balance due. A big refund check from the IRS often indicates unnecessary overpayments over the course of the year. Now's the time to investigate the reasons behind a refund and whether you need to take steps to lower wage withholding and/or quarterly estimated tax payments.

If you had to pay the IRS when filing your return (or requesting an extension), you should consider whether it was due to a sudden windfall of income that will not repeat itself,a change in itemized deductions, change in marital status, or a one-time tax credit claim, such as energy savings or education. Likewise, examining anticipated changes between your 2013 and 2014 tax years—marriage, the birth of a child, becoming a homeowner, retiring, etc.—can help warn you whether you're headed for an underpayment or overpayment of your 2014 tax liability.

Investment income. One area that blindsided many taxpayers on their 2013 returns was the increased tax bill applicable to investment income. Because of the "great recession," many investors had carryforward losses that could offset gains realized for a number of years as markets gradually improved. For many, however, 2013 saw not only a significant rise in investment income but also a rise in realized taxable investment gains that were no longer covered by carryforward losses used up during the 2010–2012 period.

Furthermore, dividends and long-term capital gains for the first time in 2013 were taxed at a new, higher 20 percent rate for higher income taxpayers and an additional 3.8 percent net investment income tax surtax for those in the higher income brackets. Short-term capital gains saw the highest rate jump, from 35 percent to 43.4 percent, which reflected a new 39.6 percent regular rate and the new 3.8 percent net investment income tax rate. This tax structure remains in place for 2014.

Personal exemption/itemized deductions. Effective January 1, 2013, the American Taxpayer Relief Act (ATRA) revived the personal exemption phaseout (PEP). The applicable threshold levels are $250,000 for unmarried taxpayers; $275,000 for heads of households; $300,000 for married couples filing a joint return (and surviving spouses); and $150,000 for married couples filing separate returns (adjusted for inflation after 2013). Likewise, the ATRA revived the limitation on itemized deductions (known as the "Pease" limitation after the member of Congress who sponsored the original legislation) for those same taxpayers.

Medical and dental expenses. Starting in 2013, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) increased the threshold to claim an itemized deduction for unreimbursed medical expenses from 7.5 percent of adjusted gross income (AGI) to 10 percent of AGI. However, there is a temporary exemption for individuals age 65 and older until December 31, 2016. Qualified individuals may continue to deduct total medical expenses that exceed 7.5 percent of adjusted gross income through 2016. If the qualified individual is married and only one spouse is age 65 or older, the taxpayer may still deduct total medical expenses that exceed 7.5 percent of adjusted gross income.

Recordkeeping. If you cannot find the paperwork necessary to prove your right to a deduction or credit, you cannot claim it. An organized tax recordkeeping system—whether on paper or computerized–is an essential component to maximizing tax savings.

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IRS Circular 230 Disclosure: To ensure compliance with requirements imposed by the IRS, we inform you that any U.S. federal tax advice contained in this communication (including any attachments) is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, for the purpose of (i) avoiding penalties under the Internal Revenue Code or (ii) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any transaction or matter addressed herein.

Gettry Marcus CPA, P.C. is a top New York City and Long Island CPA firm with offices in Woodbury, Long Island and New York City. We provide accounting, tax, and consulting services to commercial businesses, high net worth individuals and various industries which include real estate and health care. We have one of the premier and most credentialed business valuation, litigation and forensic accounting groups in the New York Area. Our experience in diverse industries and a highly talented and experienced professional staff gives us the ability to share valuable insights into our clients' businesses, to better understand their goals and problems and to help them attain the vision they have for their company.

Gettry Marcus is "Always Looking Deeper" to build value for our clients.

Media inquiries: Contact FayellenDietchweiler at 516-364-3390 ext. 225 or at

fdietchweiler(at)gettrymarcus(dot)com

Media Contact: Fayellen Dietchweiler, Gettry Marcus CPA, P.C., 516-364-3390 x 225, fdietchweiler@gettrymarcus.com

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