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Financial News from The Atlantic

  • The most common account is that the guy who just wanted to make potato salad—"Basically I'm just making potato salad. I was unable to scrape the endless data on social media, so I looked at a small sample of comments that appeared on a Facebook share of when the campaign had hit $23,000.

  • So broad are their criteria that an individual is able to be placed onto a watch list—and kept there—even if he or she is acquitted of a terrorism-related crime. The rationale for adding someone to a watch list has gone from broad and opaque under the Bush administration to even more expansive under the Obama administration, …

  • Anti-Surveillance Camouflage for Your Face The Atlantic - 10 hours ago

    The patterns in which I applied the paint were important: To the pixel-calculating machinations of facial recognition algorithms, they transformed my face into a mess of unremarkable pixels. CV dazzle was developed by the artist, designer, and entrepreneur, Adam Harvey, who created the patterns as a student at NYU’s Interactive …

  • She quoted Sendhil Mullainathan, an economist and the author the book Scarcity: “The biggest mistake we make about scarcity is we view it as a physical phenomenon. A new study out of the University of California at Berkeley examined how the perception of time can be distorted by being in a position of power. With the help …

  • Facebook Is Eating Mobile The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 23, 2014 5:35 PM EDT

    On May 7, 2012, 11 days before Facebook suffered the biggest tech IPO flop in modern history, the company filed an amendment to its prospectus, on pages 14, 17, and 57, that amounted to a blaring red light for investors.   We believe this trend is driven in part by increased usage of Facebook on mobile devices where we …

  • Where Restaurant Reservations Come From The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 23, 2014 3:01 PM EDT

    Here's a crucial piece of social infrastructure that almost no one considers: the restaurant reservation. "Make reservation by phone for the greatest dinner of your life" (California Digital Newspaper Collection)

  • Why Are Wages for Young College Grads So Terrible? The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 23, 2014 1:40 PM EDT

    In fact, the incomes of recent college grads are growing so glacially that they make the rest of the country look like we're discovering $100 bills in our coat jackets every morning. The share of recent college grads who are under-employed is higher than normal, but it's not that much higher than the long-term average. …

  • Stop Calling Everything 'Breaking News,' Please (Part 5,264) The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 23, 2014 11:30 AM EDT

    This morning, the Associated Press's Twitter account—an account followed by more than 3.5 million people, and a de facto source for news on the Internet—sent out the following tweet:  BREAKING: Dutch military plane carrying bodies from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crash lands in Eindhoven. — The Associated Press (@AP) July …

  • Smart Things in a Not-Smart World The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 23, 2014 11:15 AM EDT

    Add modern technology to extend the human empire to the ends of the Earth, and noise goes everywhere. Gordon Hempton, an acoustic ecologist, has traveled the world recording soundscapes, and he can say, pretty definitively, that there are only 12 places in the United States where you can go more than 15 minutes without …

  • Why Do Other Rich Nations Spend So Much Less on Healthcare? The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 23, 2014 9:57 AM EDT

    Despite the news last week that America's healthcare spending will not be rising at the sky-high rate that was once predicted, the fact remains that the U.S. far outspends its peer nations when it comes to healthcare costs per capita. Why does the United States spend so much more? For example, a much larger proportion …

  • What a $120,000 TV Looks Like The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 23, 2014 8:13 AM EDT

    Inches:  105. Pixels: 11 million. Aspect ratio: 29 to 1. U.S. dollars: $119,999. Meet the Samsung 05U9500 , a television that costs roughly the same  as a BMW . Or a two-bedroom house (in many places). ...

  • It's that morning people are more ethical in the morning, but evening people are more ethical in the evening,” says Sunita Sah, a co-author of the study and an assistant professor of business ethics at Georgetown University. For example, when Daylight Savings Time goes into effect and people lose an hour of sleep, their …

  • How to Invent a Person Online The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 23, 2014 6:31 AM EDT

    The ID belonged to a 28-year-old man called Aaron Brown—6 feet tall and 160 pounds with a round face, scruffy brown hair, a thin beard, and green eyes.

  • Adventures With Technology: Hide and Track The Atlantic - Tue, Jul 22, 2014 6:09 PM EDT

    We learned about the lost levels of Sonic the Hedgehog. The new theme is Hide and Track, stories about slipping away from data, or taking control of it.

  • California High-Speed Rail: 10 Readers With 10 Views The Atlantic - Tue, Jul 22, 2014 6:07 PM EDT

    As a reminder: California's plan to build a north-south High-Speed Rail (HSR) system is the most ambitious and important infrastructure project now being contemplated anywhere in the United States. Jerry Brown, now running for an unprecedented fourth term as governor, has stuck with HSR as his signature/legacy project. …

  • The Particular Trauma of Working for an Airline During a Disaster The Atlantic - Tue, Jul 22, 2014 2:11 PM EDT

    For flight attendants, whose job it is to take to the skies several times a week or even multiple times a day, the aftermath of a tragedy like last week's crash in Ukraine can be excruciating. Lating says that the lifetime prevalence rate of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is around 10 percent, though that can vary …

  • The Trauma of Working for an Airline During a Disaster The Atlantic - Tue, Jul 22, 2014 2:11 PM EDT

    For flight attendants, whose job it is to take to the skies several times a week or even multiple times a day, the aftermath of a tragedy like last week's crash in Ukraine can be excruciating. Lating says that the lifetime prevalence rate of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is around 10 percent, though that can vary …

  • The point of my book China Airborne was that just about everything involving China's potential, and its challenges, could be seen in its ambition to become an all-fronts aerospace power. They want Air China and China Eastern and China Southern to be prominent international carriers. Across the country you can find the …

  • The point of my book China Airborne was that just about everything involving China's potential, and its challenges, could be seen in its ambition to become an all-fronts aerospace power. They want Air China and China Eastern and China Southern to be prominent international carriers. Across the country you can find the …

  • A three-judge panel on a federal appeals court ruled today that the government cannot give Obamacare subsidies to people who live in states that did not set up their own, state-based health insurance exchanges.  The ruling, from the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, is a major blow to the Affordable Care Act, which sought …

  • Higher Calling, Lower Wages: The Vanishing of the Middle-Class Clergy The Atlantic - Tue, Jul 22, 2014 10:18 AM EDT

    For someone seeking a full-time job as a church pastor, Justin Barringer would seem to have the perfect résumé. So he splits his time among three jobs, working as a freelance editor, an employee at a nonprofit for the homeless, and a part-time assistant pastor at a United Methodist Church. “I am not mad at the church,” …

  • Computer Engineering: A Fine Day Job for a Poet The Atlantic - Tue, Jul 22, 2014 7:01 AM EDT

    In approximately three months, her second poetry collection, Zion (winner of the Crab Orchard Open Competition in 2013), will be published by Southern Illinois University Press. She’s managed to accomplish all of this while also serving as a senior poetry editor of Tupelo Quarterly—and while working as a Senior Integration …

  • Facebook Adds a Read-It-Later Button The Atlantic - Mon, Jul 21, 2014 6:02 PM EDT

    About a year ago, Facebook made a big change to its News Feed, the central stream users see when they open the service’s homepage or smartphone app. Since then, Facebook has continued to hone that feature, reducing the prevalence (for example) of especially click-baity content that some users find annoying. Facebook today …

  • It is basically, if you are a Simpsons fan, like finding a coupon for a hundred free Krusty Burgers, and then finding out that they'll be served to you by Krusty himself. Or ... well, if you are a Simpsons fan, you get the idea. If you were Homer, you'd probably give it a loud "Woohoo!" The "it" is Simpsons World—a project …

  • The Meticulous Art of Handmade Scissors The Atlantic - Mon, Jul 21, 2014 2:53 PM EDT

    More From The Atlantic Being Powerful Distorts People's Perception of Time Facebook Is Eating Mobile Why Are Wages for Young College Grads So Terrible?

  • Why Anti-Obamacare Ads Actually Increased Obamacare Enrollment The Atlantic - Mon, Jul 21, 2014 2:24 PM EDT

    Sacha Baron Cohen’s movie Borat was, to say the least, not very flattering to the nation of Kazakhstan: the title character, presented as a cultural emissary from the Central Asian country, is misogynistic, anti-semitic, and generally pretty racist. Niam Yaraghi, a researcher at the Brookings Institution recently tried …

  • Why Are All These Legos Washing Up on the Beach? The Atlantic - Mon, Jul 21, 2014 1:53 PM EDT

    If you happen to find yourself strolling on the beach in Cornwall, you might find some man-made detritus along with the expected array of shells and seaweed and sand. Because they'll likely be Legos. Seafaring bits of Legoland, the BBC explains, have been a regular presence on the Cornish coast for more than a decade—a …

  • Why Snapchat Cares Where You Are The Atlantic - Mon, Jul 21, 2014 9:53 AM EDT

    When Team Snapchat announced the launch of Snapchat Stories last fall, it expanded the intimacy of the service so that users could “share your day with friends—or everyone.” More recently, though, the service is fixated on the concept of everywhere, with the addition of location-based filters and other geotagging practices …

  • The 'Facebook Cop' and the Implications of Privatized Policing The Atlantic - Sun, Jul 20, 2014 8:00 AM EDT

    The tech company agreed to pay the officer’s salary and benefits, which totaled roughly $200,000, even though she’s officially part of a government organization, the Menlo Park Police Department. “It's not the 'Facebook officer,’” a company spokesperson insisted in the Wall Street Journal article. “It's the officer for …

  • How the Moon Became a Real Place The Atlantic - Sun, Jul 20, 2014 7:30 AM EDT

    For a celestial body that was thought to host bizarre extraterrestrial life, it looked, from afar, like something rather ordinary. "In truth, a common photograph of the moon does bear a striking resemblance to a peeled orange," wrote The County newspaper of Missouri in 1881. These days, plenty of people seem to have moved …

  • The Surprisingly Savvy Weird Al Internet Machine The Atlantic - Sat, Jul 19, 2014 8:30 AM EDT

    To this litany of old media institutions, let me add a somewhat unorthodox one: Weird Al Yankovic. He came up on syndicated FM radio. His first targets were Michael Jackson and Madonna, icons of 20th-century recording artistry. So as we try to make sense of Mandatory Fun, Al’s fourteenth studio album—and as we round into …

  • A Reading List of Stories About the Moon The Atlantic - Sat, Jul 19, 2014 5:00 AM EDT

    How the Moon Became a Real Place Once humans stepped on, smelled, and tasted the lunar surface—our relationship with it changed forever.  How the Moon Was Born New evidence solves an old mystery about the origins of Earth's largest satellite. The Trash We've Left on the Moon The lunar surface is strewn with hundreds of …

  • Don't Blame Malaysia Airlines The Atlantic - Sat, Jul 19, 2014 1:37 AM EDT

    I have an op-ed in Saturday morning's NYT, whose title gets across its point: "Don't Blame Malaysia Airlines." A terrible crime and disaster occurred, but that is not Malaysia Air's fault. Shorter still: According to Spiegel (German version here), while some airlines, including Air France, had changed their routes to …

  • Abbey Road's Photographic Echo The Atlantic - Fri, Jul 18, 2014 2:17 PM EDT

    A man in blue jeans just walked across Abbey Road. Yes, there's an Abbey Road livestream, a video camera trained on the crosswalk made famous by the 1969 Beatles album Abbey Road.

  • Baby Photos and Clinging to My Principles The Atlantic - Fri, Jul 18, 2014 12:44 PM EDT

    I live a pretty public life, and the decision to keep him off my Twitter feed and this space felt like asserting that I had a right to privacy. Really, I'd already been in the digital media game for so long that I needed to give permission to myself not to share. Recently, I've gotten up close to the line.

  • How to Write a Cover Letter, According to Great Artists The Atlantic - Fri, Jul 18, 2014 12:11 PM EDT

    So job applicants’ cover letters seem unlikely to contain much great prose. When a 30-something Leonardo da Vinci sought work in the court of the duke of Milan in the 1480s, he wrote a short, bulleted list of ten skills that would have been sure to catch the eye of any Renaissance-era ruler: he could design portable, indestructible bridges; …

  • Where Does Discarded Clothing Go? The Atlantic - Fri, Jul 18, 2014 10:04 AM EDT

    In Brooklyn, New York, where space is precious, it's not surprising that many of the borough's residents are starting to complain, loudly, about the countless used-clothing donation bins gobbling up sidewalks and serving as a magnet for garbage and graffiti. The proliferating bins are owned by Viltex, a Newark-based, for-profit …

  • The Rise of the Wedding Drone The Atlantic - Fri, Jul 18, 2014 8:39 AM EDT

    When most people hear the word “drone,” they probably think of killing machines that patrol war zones. A congressman last month used a drone to record his own wedding and now is under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the government agency that regulates the nation’s airspace, because the agency …

  • Portraits of a World Slipping Away The Atlantic - Fri, Jul 18, 2014 7:55 AM EDT

    New York City, when Joe Richman arrived there in 1989, was a different city than it is today. "It was this special time, when you were sort of seeing the last of a lot of things—the last of a certain kind of business ... a certain kind of New York," he said to me. A bit more than a decade later, in 2002, Richman, of Radio …

  • The Details About the CIA's Deal With Amazon The Atlantic - Thu, Jul 17, 2014 3:15 PM EDT

    The intelligence community is about to get the equivalent of an adrenaline shot to the chest. This summer, a $600 million computing cloud developed by Amazon Web Services for the Central Intelligence Agency over the past year will begin servicing all 17 agencies that make up the intelligence community. If the technology …

  • A Malaysian Airlines Boeing 777 has crashed in the Ukraine, in a region that's been marked by battles between the government and a Russian separatist movement. Both the Ukrainian military and the separatists calling themselves the Donetsk People's Republic have denied responsibility.  Andrei Purgin, deputy prime minister …

  • A Malaysian Airlines Boeing 777 has crashed in the Ukraine, in a region that's been marked by battles between the government and a Russian separatist movement. Both the Ukrainian military and the separatists calling themselves the Donetsk People's Republic have denied responsibility.  Andrei Purgin, deputy prime minister …

  • The Malaysia Air Crash: Should We Publish Pictures of Bodies? The Atlantic - Thu, Jul 17, 2014 2:26 PM EDT

    It included nine points, one of which was this: "In the immediate aftermath, news outlets will get it wrong."  This is true.

  • A Verified News Photo Doesn't Have to Be a Published News Photo The Atlantic - Thu, Jul 17, 2014 2:26 PM EDT

    It included nine points, one of which was this: "In the immediate aftermath, news outlets will get it wrong." 

  • It included nine points, one of which was this: "In the immediate aftermath, news outlets will get it wrong."  This is true.

  • The FAA's Notice Prohibiting Airline Flights Over Ukraine The Atlantic - Thu, Jul 17, 2014 2:12 PM EDT

    Nearly three months ago, on the "Special Rules" section of its site, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration put out an order prohibiting American pilots, airlines, charter carriers, and everyone else over whom the FAA has direct jurisdiction, from flying over southern parts of Ukraine. For more information, try this …

  • Jeff Koons's Science Projects The Atlantic - Thu, Jul 17, 2014 1:47 PM EDT

    Today, H&M will release a special-edition leather handbag featuring the likeness of Jeff Koons’s Balloon Dog (Yellow) in some stores and on its website. To celebrate (and, really, further publicize) the occasion, Koons will decorate the six-story facade of the Swedish retailer’s Fifth Avenue flagship store in New York …

  • When Will Robots Take Over the World? The Atlantic - Thu, Jul 17, 2014 12:27 PM EDT

    More From The Atlantic Why Do Other Rich Nations Spend So Much Less on Healthcare? Morning People Are More Likely to Lie to Their Bosses in the Afternoon The Trauma of Working for an Airline During a Disaster...

  • What If Healthcare Spending Doesn't Destroy America? The Atlantic - Thu, Jul 17, 2014 10:52 AM EDT

    One of my favorite lessons from Daniel Gilbert, the Harvard psychologist, is that the future is rarely as hellish or as heavenly as we imagine it to be. It would be irresponsible to suggest that the 2014 projections are correct.

  • 'LEL,' 'Nyahahaha,' 'U Wat Brah': The Creative Ways We Laugh Online The Atlantic - Thu, Jul 17, 2014 9:28 AM EDT

    "The passion of Laughter," Thomas Hobbes argued, "is nothyng else but a suddaine Glory arising from some suddaine Conception of some Eminency in our selves, by Comparison with the Infirmityes of others." They are acknowledgements of the hilarity of our conversation partners. Part of this variety comes from that fact that …

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