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Financial News from The Atlantic

  • Wittenberg-Cox makes her case based on her observations of Lego, which has long been criticized for the gender imbalance in its product offerings. Small wonder, says Wittenberg-Cox, given what Lego's leadership looks like: Its senior management is comprised of 22 men and two women. The corporate management of the largest …

  • On a plane earlier this week, I watched The Wolf of Wall Street. As despicable as some of Jordan Belfort’s behavior was, I was able to occasionally laugh at Leonardo DiCaprio's version of him knowing that, by now, more than 10 years after his real-life sentencing, Belfort has been sufficiently punished. In a testimonial …

  • So when Bell Telephone launched its first phone systems, in 1878, the company hired as its operators ... teenage boys. Though Bell had no problem recruiting the boys for that work—"this combination of power, technical mastery, and effective anonymity seemed to act like catnip to teenage boys," Bruce Sterling notes—the …

  • For more than a decade, Naomi Klein has been calling attention to the invisible, abstract concerns that hide in the shadows of global trade: the exploitation of far-off workers, the environmental destruction, the corruption that contorts political systems. These days, the prevailing mood in response to climate change seems …

  • Albert Einstein never won a Nobel prize for the theory of relativity—in fact, it was only through long, political jockeying within the Nobel committee that he won the prize at all. Instead, when he was given the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics (in 1922, after a long bout of internal Nobel hand-wringing), he received it primarily …

  • On the second day of March 1950, Helen Keller showed up at MIT’s Research Laboratory of Electronics. There, she encountered Norbert Wiener, the mathematician and engineer best known as the father of cybernetics. After helping to design destructive anti-aircraft guns during the war, the awkward but brilliant math professor …

  • Martha, the Very Last Passenger Pigeon The Atlantic - Thu, Sep 18, 2014 6:00 PM EDT

    When you walk into the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, the first thing you see is an elephant. I wanted to know how the Smithsonian preserved the world's last living passenger pigeon.

  • Meet Martha, the Very Last Passenger Pigeon The Atlantic - Thu, Sep 18, 2014 6:00 PM EDT

    When you walk into the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, the first thing you see is an elephant. I wanted to know how the Smithsonian preserved the world's last living passenger pigeon.

  • The famous video of Ray Rice striking his girlfriend is edited. TMZ put it in their original story: “This video is a cleaned up version of the raw surveillance elevator video—the raw is jerky ... so we smoothed it out.” It’s this edited version that has aired on television and been discussed online. I wish I had it." …

  • The famous video of Ray Rice striking his girlfriend is edited. This isn’t a secret. TMZ put it in their original story: “ This video is a cleaned up version of the raw surveillance elevator video—the ...

  • Interning Is the New Volunteering The Atlantic - Thu, Sep 18, 2014 12:01 PM EDT

    Whitney Holmes was the program coordinator at the Depression & Bipolar Support Alliance National Headquarters in Chicago when a local university student committed to volunteering with the non-profit for three months. Holmes, who also works with volunteers now as the executive director of Switchback Books, was discouraged …

  • It's 2014: Why Are Men Still Paying for First Dates? The Atlantic - Thu, Sep 18, 2014 10:28 AM EDT

    I don’t see the point,” 18-year-old Chiamaka Njoku told her. The survey, put together by the financial website NerdWallet, polled roughly 1,000 people who had been dating their partners for six months or more.

  • Single-Stream Recycling Is Easier for Consumers, but Is It Better? The Atlantic - Thu, Sep 18, 2014 6:00 AM EDT

    Single-stream recycling seems so simple. Single-stream recycling has two main advantages: Since it's so much easier than sorting out recyclables for individuals, it increases household recycling rates, and since it's easier to dump one can of stuff into a collection truck with one compartment, it saves cities money.

  • Behind the web’s seething stream of new things, there’s an enormous archive. Such seemed to be the case this week when Twitter users started swapping around what appeared to be an old ad from a magazine. It advertised that, with the purchase of a new cassette tape player, consumers could get themselves a free copy of …

  • After Uber, San Francisco Cab Use Has Dropped by Roughly 65% The Atlantic - Wed, Sep 17, 2014 3:11 PM EDT

    Yesterday afternoon, the director of the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency gave a presentation to the organization's board of directors. It was titled "Taxis and Accessible Services Division: Status of Taxi Industry," though it may as well have been titled "How the Taxi Industry Is Doing Now That Uber Is a …

  • Uber Has Cut San Francisco Cab Use by Almost 300 Percent The Atlantic - Wed, Sep 17, 2014 3:11 PM EDT

    Yesterday afternoon, the director of the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency gave a presentation to the organization's board of directors. It was titled "Taxis and Accessible Services Division: Status of Taxi Industry," though it may as well have been titled "How the Taxi Industry Is Doing Now That Uber Is a …

  • After Uber, San Francisco Has Seen a 65-Percent Decline in Cab Use The Atlantic - Wed, Sep 17, 2014 3:11 PM EDT

    Yesterday afternoon, the director of the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency gave a presentation to the organization's board of directors. It was titled "Taxis and Accessible Services Division: Status of Taxi Industry," though it may as well have been titled "How the Taxi Industry Is Doing Now That Uber Is a …

  • Uber Has Cut San Fransisco Cab Use by Almost 300 Percent The Atlantic - Wed, Sep 17, 2014 3:11 PM EDT

    Yesterday afternoon, the director of the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency gave a presentation to the organization's board of directors. It was titled "Taxis and Accessible Services Division: Status of Taxi Industry," though it may as well have been titled "How the Taxi Industry Is Doing Now That Uber Is a …

  • The One-Paragraph iPhone 6 Review The Atlantic - Wed, Sep 17, 2014 2:20 PM EDT

    Late Tuesday night, the first reviews of Apple’s new smartphones were published. Though the reviews come from a wide swath of writers—everyone from the Gray Lady to an elite Apple blogger to Stephen Fry ...

  • The New iPhones Reviewed, in One Paragraph The Atlantic - Wed, Sep 17, 2014 2:20 PM EDT

    So in case you don’t have time to read the megabytes of criticism which have been published, here are the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus reviewed, each in one paragraph. The iPhone 6 starts at $199 with contract and has a 4.7-inch screen.

  • Sometimes, productivity science seems like an organized conspiracy to justify laziness. Clicking through photos of cute small animals at work? That's not silly procrastination, Hiroshima University researchers ...

  • When the Government Wanted a Database of Everyone's IQ The Atlantic - Wed, Sep 17, 2014 10:51 AM EDT

    In November of 1967, The Atlantic's cover featured an evil Uncle Sam generating data readouts in a dark control room. The journalist behind the cover story, Arthur Miller, noted at the time that computer science was already so advanced "that experts envisage a huge National Data Center to speed and simplify the collection …

  • If Greed Is Good, Why Is Insider Trading Bad? The Atlantic - Wed, Sep 17, 2014 7:35 AM EDT

    Like other laws that attempt to maintain a spirit of equity, insider trading is a legal distinction that rests on a moral misgiving. Attorney who led the prosecution’s case, Preet Bharara, described Martoma’s crime as akin to buying “the answer sheet before the exam,” which is to say, he and his employer cheated. It may …

  • Can a Nation's Soil Explain Its Economic Fortunes? The Atlantic - Wed, Sep 17, 2014 7:30 AM EDT

    Jared Diamond argued, in his 1997 book Guns, Germs, and Steel, that geography is fate. One thread of his theory sought to explain why societies in Eurasia developed more quickly than in the Americas and Africa. Because Eurasia is oriented horizontally, he argued, all of its ancient inhabitants were at roughly similar …

  • Black, White, Asian, Hispanic: The Disparities in Household Income The Atlantic - Tue, Sep 16, 2014 5:16 PM EDT

    Census Bureau released their annual report on income and poverty for 2013. Median household income remained steady from 2012 to 2013, although median household income in 2013 was eight percent lower than in 2007 when adjusted for inflation. Breaking down household median income by race, Hispanic households were the only …

  • The Internet Is Losing Interest in Computers The Atlantic - Tue, Sep 16, 2014 3:07 PM EDT

    You may know Google Trends. It takes all the searches that all the humans (and other users of Google) make, pulls them apart, and deduces what topics people are searching for. This chart shows the Google Trend for all topics counted under "Computers & Electronics," which includes mobile phones and the like. The fact …

  • Making Babies Outside of the Womb Has Never Been So Easy The Atlantic - Tue, Sep 16, 2014 2:42 PM EDT

    A little more than forty years ago, one of the first attempts at in-vitro fertilization ended when the chairman of the OB-GYN department at New York's Columbia-Presbyterian hospital took the test tube containing the growing embryos out of the incubator that was keeping them alive. Four decades ago, no one had ever conceived …

  • The 100% Renewable-Powered City: Too Good to be True? The Atlantic - Tue, Sep 16, 2014 1:00 PM EDT

    "[The local utility companies do not contend] that each of their customers' lights comes from renewable sources all the time. "They are selling the renewable energy credits to customers in other states. Those customers have the renewable and clean energy benefits of that power," [one expert] said. "Simply using accounting …

  • Yesterday I mentioned the latest accomplishment of Burlington, Vermont. "[The local utility companies do not contend] that each of their customers' lights comes from renewable sources all the time. "They are selling the renewable energy credits to customers in other states. Those customers have the renewable and clean …

  • The 100 Percent Renewable-Powered City: Too Good to be True? The Atlantic - Tue, Sep 16, 2014 1:00 PM EDT

    "[The local utility companies do not contend] that each of their customers' lights comes from renewable sources all the time. "They are selling the renewable energy credits to customers in other states. Those customers have the renewable and clean energy benefits of that power," [one expert] said. "Simply using accounting …

  • Do People Remember News Better If They Read It in Print? The Atlantic - Tue, Sep 16, 2014 12:57 PM EDT

    Consider two different morning routines. In the first, you’re already washed and dressed as you sit down to your morning newspaper. While sipping coffee at the breakfast bar, you leisurely peruse the events ...

  • The Last Refrigerator The Atlantic - Tue, Sep 16, 2014 7:30 AM EDT

    Dave Bevard, former union president of the Machinists in Galesburg, Illinois, with the last refrigerator ever produced at the Maytag plant there. Ten years ago on this day in September, the last Maytag refrigerator moved down the assembly line in Galesburg, Illinois, a quiet little city of 32,000 on the western edge of …

  • Future Ennui The Atlantic - Tue, Sep 16, 2014 7:00 AM EDT

    With the newly announced Apple Watch, now the company wants to condense it even further and have you wear it on your wrist. Some have accused Apple of failing to explain the purpose of their new wearable. The wristwatch connoisseur Benjamin Clymer calls it a “market leader in a category nobody asked for.” Apple veteran …

  • Before Computers, People Programmed Looms The Atlantic - Tue, Sep 16, 2014 6:00 AM EDT

    Like, for instance, the image above: a woven piece of fabric that depicts Joseph-Marie Jacquard, the inventor of the weaving technology that made its creation possible. As James Essinger recounts in Jacquard's Web, in the early 1840s Charles Babbage kept a copy at home and would ask guests to guess how it was made.

  • Everything: You're Doing It Wrong The Atlantic - Mon, Sep 15, 2014 1:44 PM EDT

    Are you having a good day? Are you feeling rested, and happy, and ready to conquer the week ahead with your signature mixture of aggression and aplomb? Are you on top of your game, and thus on top of the ...

  • Greening Up in Burlington, Rocking Out in Allentown The Atlantic - Mon, Sep 15, 2014 1:15 PM EDT

    Last year our American Futures team reported on several almost-too-good-to-be-true aspects of life in Burlington, Vermont. Both were pretty impressive at the arena's first event Friday.

  • Confirmed: Tipping Is a Terrible Way to Pay People The Atlantic - Mon, Sep 15, 2014 10:57 AM EDT

    Jimmie Luthuli, 34, has worked as a waitress all over Washington. In 2009, the federal government raised the minimum wage to $7.25 per hour—but, under lobbying pressure from the restaurant industry, it did nothing for the many thousands of people who work for gratuities. Under a lesser-known subsection of the minimum-wage …

  • Breathing Life Into Allentown: Pennsylvania Comes to the Rescue The Atlantic - Mon, Sep 15, 2014 10:30 AM EDT

    Preparing for a new season of American Futures reports, Jim Fallows, Deb Fallows, and I spent most of an August week in Allentown, the third-largest city in Pennsylvania. Last week our partners at Marketplace did their report on Allentown, here. Allentown has been struggling economically for decades, its problems exacerbated …

  • When You Can't Afford Sleep The Atlantic - Mon, Sep 15, 2014 8:00 AM EDT

    NEW YORK—If it’s a Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, or Saturday, Sam McCalman wakes up in his tiny one-bedroom apartment in Flatbush well before the nearest Starbucks opens for business.

  • The Entrepreneur Who Wants to Save Paradise The Atlantic - Mon, Sep 15, 2014 8:00 AM EDT

    Artilio Sanchez is a rancher in a remote region of Patagonia, the alluring land in the south of Chile and Argentina. Conversation turned to what everyone in Patagonia is talking about: Conservación Patagonica, the latest addition to the world’s largest private conservation project. When I mentioned the man behind all …

  • Portland Cement Changed the Way the World Looked The Atlantic - Sun, Sep 14, 2014 3:16 PM EDT

    We use so much of the stuff that the cement industry is responsible, all on its own, for 5 percent of global carbon dioxide emissions. In the second half of the 1700s, in England, engineers were experimenting once again with heating up limestone to create a powder that, when wet, would set and hold together. In 1757, …

  • Cement Makes the Modern World Possible The Atlantic - Sun, Sep 14, 2014 3:16 PM EDT

    We use so much of the stuff that the cement industry is responsible, all on its own, for 5 percent of global carbon dioxide emissions. In the second half of the 1700s, in England, engineers were experimenting once again with heating up limestone to create a powder that, when wet, would set and hold together. In 1757, …

  • Americans Won't Relax, Even Late at Night or on the Weekend The Atlantic - Sun, Sep 14, 2014 7:30 AM EDT

    A new paper by economists Dan Hamermesh and Elena Stancanelli found that Americans not only work longer hours, but they are more likely to work late at night and on weekends as well. They found that on a typical weeknight, a quarter of American workers did some kind of work between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. That’s a lot, compared …

  • Who Will Take Care of the Elderly? The Atlantic - Fri, Sep 12, 2014 4:19 PM EDT

    If life were fair, Marsha Schumacher, 69, wouldn't have to worry about affording care in retirement. Schumacher left the workforce in 1982 to look after both her son, who'd begun manifesting symptoms of bipolar disorder at five years of age, and her husband, who was exhibiting similar behaviors. Today she and her husband …

  • Yesterday Marketplace had a very thorough story about Allentown’s effort to revive its downtown, and I did a teaser for a series of posts we’ll start next week. If you check the Marketplace link, you can read a great overview by Tommy Andres of the city's predicament and plans. As a bonus you'll see the incredibly Village …

  • Countdown to Tonight's Arena Debut in Allentown The Atlantic - Fri, Sep 12, 2014 3:02 PM EDT

    Yesterday Marketplace had a very thorough story about Allentown’s effort to revive its downtown, and I did a teaser for a series of posts we’ll start next week. If you check the Marketplace link, you can read a great overview by Tommy Andres of the city's predicament and plans. As a bonus you'll see the incredibly Village …

  • A Brief History of Shrinking Wallpaper The Atlantic - Fri, Sep 12, 2014 1:56 PM EDT

    In the Middle Ages, the rich hung tapestries on their walls, and in fact the very earliest wallpapers were mostly huge paper prints hung or glued to the wall. The most famous of these early “wallpapers” was the nearly 10 foot tall print Triumphal Arch, commissioned by the Roman Emperor Maximilian I. Wallpaper now became …

  • D'Oh, Canada! Apple's Latest Map Mixes Up Toronto and Ottawa The Atlantic - Fri, Sep 12, 2014 1:47 PM EDT

    Americans probably have a lot to apologize to Canadians for, but one of them is this: Most of us have very little idea about Canada's most basic geography. Turns out that Apple, the company that praises itself for its ability to connect people across geographies, has the same confusion. Earlier this week, Canadians, like …

  • In Online Dating, Everyone's a Little Bit Racist The Atlantic - Fri, Sep 12, 2014 12:07 PM EDT

    Read In Online Dating, Everyone's a Little Bit Racist on theatlantic.com More From The Atlantic Do Toy Companies Need More Women at the Top? Financial Criminals Have Been Fined Billions, but They Rarely ...

  • The Weird Little Industry Behind a Mesmerizing Instrument The Atlantic - Fri, Sep 12, 2014 11:27 AM EDT

    Josiah Collett, a 10-year-old autistic boy from Broxbourne, England, had always struggled with social interactions. The busker tapped the instrument, called a “handpan,” which emitted both drum-like rhythms and delicate harmonies. Josiah was always preternaturally talented when it came to music—he taught himself to play …

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