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Financial News from The Atlantic

  • iTunes Really Is That Bad The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 29, 2015 10:35 AM EDT

    Toxic hellstew it may be, a new version of iTunes points at what kinds of technology are allowed to come out of Apple. Apple is the most valuable company in the world and an organization hailed for its good design.

  • Night Vision Without the Goggles The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 29, 2015 8:45 AM EDT

    In March, Gabriel Licina pinned his eyes open and had his friend, Jeffrey Tibbetts, place several drops of a carefully calibrated liquid into his eyes. The chemical has been used in cancer treatment for years, but that’s not why Licina put it in his eyes. Licina and his team were using it for another property: ce6 makes …

  • Don't Drink the Water The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 29, 2015 8:00 AM EDT

    Mays and other residents say that the city government endangered their health when it stopped buying water from Detroit last year and instead started selling residents treated water from the Flint River. “Flint is an extreme case, but nationally, there’s been a lack of investment in water infrastructure,” said Eric Scorsone, …

  • How Aging Infrastructure Is Poisoning the U.S. Drinking Supply The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 29, 2015 8:00 AM EDT

    Mays and other residents say that the city government endangered their health when it stopped buying water from Detroit last year and instead started selling residents treated water from the Flint River. “Flint is an extreme case, but nationally, there’s been a lack of investment in water infrastructure,” said Eric Scorsone, …

  • Aging Pipes Are Poisoning America's Tap Water The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 29, 2015 8:00 AM EDT

    Mays and other residents say that the city government endangered their health when it stopped buying water from Detroit last year and instead started selling residents treated water from the Flint River. “Flint is an extreme case, but nationally, there’s been a lack of investment in water infrastructure,” said Eric Scorsone, …

  • Aging Infrastructure Is Poisoning America's Water Supply The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 29, 2015 8:00 AM EDT

    Mays and other residents say that the city government endangered their health when it stopped buying water from Detroit last year and instead started selling residents treated water from the Flint River. “Flint is an extreme case, but nationally, there’s been a lack of investment in water infrastructure,” said Eric Scorsone, …

  • How Rich People Raise Rich Kids The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 29, 2015 7:47 AM EDT

    For example, one study out of Harvard found that moving poor families into better neighborhoods greatly increased the chances that children would escape poverty when they grew up. While it’s well documented that the children of the wealthy tend to grow up to be wealthy, researchers are still at work on how and why that …

  • America Offline The Atlantic - Tue, Jul 28, 2015 5:43 PM EDT

    The population of people in the United States who don't have an Internet connection is down to 15 percent, new data from Pew Research shows. In the span of 15 years, the United States has transformed into a mostly-Internet-connected country. Back in 2000, a full 48 percent of Americans told Pew they did not use the I …

  • How Archaeologists Dug Up a Human-Shaped Coffin That Wasn't There The Atlantic - Tue, Jul 28, 2015 4:23 PM EDT

    A team of archaeologists and historians announced on Tuesday that they’ve  identified the remains of four prominent men who died at Jamestown, the first permanent English colony in America, between 1608 and 1616—extraordinary news made even more intriguing by the discovery of a relic that suggests there were Catholics secretly …

  • The Tragedy of iTunes and Classical Music The Atlantic - Tue, Jul 28, 2015 1:51 PM EDT

    Digital music software has never been well adapted to classical music. Two years later, the developer Stan Brown published a guide on his website to “taming” Apple’s software for classical music. Since then, other hacks and kludges have followed.

  • Job Hunting With Schizophrenia The Atlantic - Tue, Jul 28, 2015 7:51 AM EDT

    Muhammad is one of the estimated 2 million American adults who suffer from schizophrenia. In 2006, Fuller Torrey, an American psychiatrist and schizophrenia researcher, argued that, “when the social history of our era is written, the plight of persons with schizophrenia will be recorded as having been a national scandal.” …

  • The Myth of New Orleans’s Affordability The Atlantic - Tue, Jul 28, 2015 7:45 AM EDT

    In popular (and pricey) cities such as New York and San Francisco, the idea of outrageous rental prices is easy to grasp. These are the places that birth urban legends about awful housing situations: Three ...

  • Why Women Shouldn’t Have to Act Like Dudes at Work The Atlantic - Mon, Jul 27, 2015 7:25 AM EDT

    Barbara Annis is the founder of the Gender Intelligence Group, a consultancy that works with executives at major firms (including Deloitte, American Express, BMO Financial Group, and eBay) to create strategies to transform their work cultures into ones that are friendly to both men and women. Barbara Annis: I started this …

  • Rebuilding the Breast The Atlantic - Mon, Jul 27, 2015 7:05 AM EDT

    Breast reconstruction is a highly technical and evolving field that employs techniques and technologies from beyond the typical boundaries of surgery—from stem cells to 3D-printed nipples. According to the Journal of the American Medical Association, about 35 percent of women with early-stage breast cancer will undergo …

  • Breakfast With Zeke The Atlantic - Sun, Jul 26, 2015 6:59 PM EDT

    By the time the fourth and last breakfast is over, next Sunday, each of Emanuel's three daughters, and at least one nephew and niece, will have helped find and bring ingredients, greet guests, and clear tables. Nearly all of Emanuel's pop-up breakfast venture, in fact, was true to its origins at the dinners he likes to …

  • The Insecure World of Freelancing The Atlantic - Sat, Jul 25, 2015 8:30 AM EDT

    When Sara Horowitz founded the Freelancers Union in 1995, there was already evidence that the structure of people's work lives was changing. Horowitz, a union organizer and labor lawyer by training, assumed that other industries would follow. Today, the Brooklyn-based Freelancers Union boasts nearly 300,000 members, having …

  • Freelancers of the World, Unite! The Atlantic - Sat, Jul 25, 2015 8:30 AM EDT

    When Sara Horowitz founded the Freelancers Union in 1995, there was already evidence that the structure of people's work lives was changing. Horowitz, a union organizer and labor lawyer by training, assumed that other industries would follow. Today, the Brooklyn-based Freelancers Union boasts nearly 300,000 members, having …

  • Why Is It So Hard to Track Taser Use? The Atlantic - Fri, Jul 24, 2015 10:26 AM EDT

    The new video of the arrest of Sandra Bland is brutal and hard to watch. The officer, a Texas state trooper named Brian Encinia, exchanges words with Bland, then demands she step out of the car. The footage is disturbing, but it also reflects a common problem: Tasers are not only used by law-enforcement agents as less …

  • I Like the Bus The Atlantic - Fri, Jul 24, 2015 10:02 AM EDT

    Earlier this week, at The Billfold, Ester Bloom wrote that she enjoys the bus (Megabus, to be exact) the least of all methods of transportation, ranking it below “being dragged by the hair.” That’s okay. People complain about this, but I think of it as just another way the bus is protecting me from the stressors of the …

  • A Search Engine, but Not on the Internet The Atlantic - Fri, Jul 24, 2015 8:47 AM EDT

    With all the hype around the Internet of Things—a future in which ordinary devices are sensor equipped and wifi-connected—we might be missing a concept that is something like its inverse: Let’s call it the Search Engine of Things. The Israeli start-up Consumer Physics was founded four years ago by Dror Sharon and Damian …

  • Where Are All the Minority Journalists? The Atlantic - Fri, Jul 24, 2015 7:53 AM EDT

    Pretty pathetic, considering the fact that minorities make up 37.4 percent of the U.S. population. In an analysis published in the Columbia Journalism Review, Alex T. Williams, a Ph.D. student at the University of Pennsylvania, addresses the question of why there are so few minorities in mainstream media. Williams debunks …

  • A 1960s Myth of a Post-Materialist America The Atlantic - Fri, Jul 24, 2015 7:20 AM EDT

    What a joy it would be to show the America of 2015 to Edward T. Chase. Chase, the author of a 1962 Atlantic essay titled “Money Isn’t Everything,” was positively euphoric as he observed the cultural changes of the post-war period. “It is my belief,” he wrote, “that in fact we in the United States are evolving beyond what …

  • The Triumph of Consumerism The Atlantic - Fri, Jul 24, 2015 7:20 AM EDT

    What a joy it would be to show the America of 2015 to Edward T. Chase. Chase, the author of a 1962 Atlantic essay titled “Money Isn’t Everything,” was positively euphoric as he observed the cultural changes of the post-war period. “It is my belief,” he wrote, “that in fact we in the United States are evolving beyond what …

  • Earlier this month an Air Force F-16 and a little single-engine Cessna 150 collided at low altitude near Charleston, South Carolina. Although it takes the NTSB months or years to come up with its definitive analyses, I said that this preliminary report included a chronicle of the Charleston air-traffic controller telling …

  • America Is Even Less Socially Mobile Than Previously Thought The Atlantic - Thu, Jul 23, 2015 11:00 AM EDT

    Sociologists and economists are probably psyched that the work they’ve been doing on inequality and social mobility for decades has finally gotten attention from the average American. In this spirit, a Pew report out today tells us things about American social mobility that are new—and at the same time all too familiar. …

  • America Is Even Less Socially Mobile Than Most Economists Thought The Atlantic - Thu, Jul 23, 2015 11:00 AM EDT

    Sociologists and economists are probably psyched that the work they’ve been doing on inequality and social mobility for decades has finally gotten attention from the average American. In this spirit, a Pew report out today tells us things about American social mobility that are new—and at the same time all too familiar. …

  • The Inadequacy of Corporate Social-Responsibility Programs The Atlantic - Thu, Jul 23, 2015 10:31 AM EDT

    According to a new paper authored by Jean-Etienne de Bettignies of Queens School of Business and David T. Robinson of the Fuqua School of Business at Duke, the money, energy, and influence used to push popular CSR programs would be better spent either radically altering the way companies operate, or allowing better regulation—which …

  • Global Warming Could Make Carbon Dating Impossible The Atlantic - Thu, Jul 23, 2015 9:56 AM EDT

    Since the 1940s, scientists have used carbon dating to determine the age of fossils, identify vintages of wine and whiskey, and explore other organic artifacts like wood and ivory. The technique involves comparing the level of one kind of carbon atom—one that decays over time—with the level of another, more stable kind …

  • A Quiet Triumph for Gay Workers The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 22, 2015 1:02 PM EDT

    Gay Americans can now get married in the morning and then, in the afternoon, just for being gay, their employers can fire them. Up until last week, the answer was yes for Americans living in the 28 states without explicit bans on workplace sexual-orientation discrimination. The EEOC’s rulings dictate the rights of most …

  • The Secret Agents Who Stake Out the Ugliest Corners of the Internet The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 22, 2015 12:57 PM EDT

    When President Obama launched his Twitter account in May, people noticed his rapid accumulation of followers, a silly back-and-forth with President Clinton, but also something more serious: the number of hostile and threatening messages directed at the president. Sifting through those messages to determine which, if any, …

  • 1-800-HIRE-A-CROWD The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 22, 2015 8:00 AM EDT

    Donald Trump's presidential campaign announcement last month was widely mocked, not only for the rambling diatribe he used to launch the campaign but for the actors he paid $50 apiece to cheer for it. Journalists responded with a predictable amount of schadenfreude when it was revealed that the Trump campaign hired actors …

  • Why American Cities Are Fighting to Attract Immigrants The Atlantic - Tue, Jul 21, 2015 10:20 AM EDT

    Immigrants take our jobs. Indeed, they’ve been heard for a century or two, as successive waves of immigrants to this nation of immigrants have first been vilified, then grudgingly tolerated, and ultimately venerated for their contributions. This time, too, there is ample evidence that immigrants are creating businesses …

  • One night in February 1998, Vice President Al Gore awoke with a start. It would sit far out in space, beyond the reach of more conventional orbiters, so distant it could capture all of planet Earth in one camera lens. It would then beam this view—the whole planetary disk, a la The Blue Marble—down to the planet below …

  • A New ‘Blue Marble’ Every Day The Atlantic - Mon, Jul 20, 2015 5:43 PM EDT

    One night in February 1998, Vice President Al Gore awoke with a start. It would sit far out in space, beyond the reach of more conventional orbiters, so distant it could capture all of planet Earth in one camera lens. It would then beam this view—the whole planetary disk, a la The Blue Marble—down to the planet below …

  • The Chain Reaction That Doomed SpaceX's Rocket The Atlantic - Mon, Jul 20, 2015 5:13 PM EDT

    A steel strut holding a helium bottle inside a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket snapped during flight, setting off a chain reaction that destroyed the rocket during a June launch, the company’s CEO and chief rocket-designer Elon Musk said. “One of those struts failed and was unable to hold the helium bottle down, and the helium …

  • What Is a ‘Computer’ Anymore? The Atlantic - Mon, Jul 20, 2015 2:00 PM EDT

    Now, leading computer scientists and technologists say the definition of “computer” is again changing. The panelists—neuroscientists, computer scientists, engineers, and academics—agreed: We have reached a profound moment of convergence and acceleration in computing technology, one that will reverberate in the way we talk …

  • In Love—and in Debt The Atlantic - Mon, Jul 20, 2015 7:15 AM EDT
    Wedding

    Chris Davis, a 28-year-old videographer and graphic designer, had been working hard to pay off his student-loans when he and his girlfriend Monique Seitz got engaged. Joint finances are hard enough even without the added complication of disproportionate student debt. Jeffrey Dew, an associate professor at Utah State University, …

  • I Like Instagram The Atlantic - Fri, Jul 17, 2015 11:39 AM EDT

    A few years ago, a friend of mine called Instagram “the best social network” without any irony. Instagram was fine—some friends were there, sure, and I guess I liked looking at pictures of food and mountains—but it didn’t actually teach me anything. It prohibits you from downloading images, so re-sharing a friend’s picture …

  • How Chicago Is Trying to Integrate Its Suburbs The Atlantic - Fri, Jul 17, 2015 10:03 AM EDT

    Many wealthy, white communities like this one would not welcome an affordable housing development. Some of the units can only be rented to people who hold Section 8 vouchers, a class of people that landlords in the suburbs often avoid. Why is an affluent suburb like Glenview open to the sort of development other similar …

  • Exposing Companies That Pay Women Less Than Men The Atlantic - Thu, Jul 16, 2015 10:21 AM EDT

    In a bid to combat the gender pay gap, Prime Minister David Cameron announced on Tuesday that his government will institute a measure requiring companies with more than 250 employees to publicly disclose information on the average pay of their male and female workers. The move, the prime minister hopes, “will cast sunlight …

  • The (Newly Discovered, Very Important) Ice Mountains of Pluto The Atlantic - Thu, Jul 16, 2015 7:39 AM EDT

    Ice mountains as tall as the Rockies loom high above Pluto’s surface. They are made of water so cold as to be like rock, and they rise out of a surface of frozen methane and nitrogen. About every 150 hours, ...

  • Blame the Banks The Atlantic - Thu, Jul 16, 2015 7:15 AM EDT

    One of the first lessons I was taught on Wall Street was, “Know who the fool is.” That was the gist of it. My first five years were spent constructing complex financial products, ones with huge profit margins for us—“toxic waste” in Wall Street lingo—to sell to them. The launch of the common European currency, the euro, …

  • Where Have All the Axes Gone? The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 15, 2015 1:39 PM EDT

    An 1859 Scientific American article on axe manufacture notes with some humor that, “It is true, if not touching, that many choppers think of and cherish their axes as though these were so many children or precious talismans.

  • Stress Toys: Mindlessness With a Purpose? The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 15, 2015 11:25 AM EDT

    The tips of all my pens are all chewed up. When I’m nervous, I take my ring off and put it back on, repeatedly. I twirl my hair and crack my knuckles and play with my necklace and slip my shoes off and ...

  • How to Say (Almost) Everything in a Hundred-Word Language The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 15, 2015 8:03 AM EDT

    While the Oxford English Dictionary contains a quarter of a million entries, and even Koko the gorilla communicates with over 1,000 gestures in American Sign Language, the total vocabulary of Toki Pona is a mere 123 words. In contrast to the hundreds or thousands of study hours required to attain fluency in other languages, …

  • Millennials Who Are Thriving Financially Have One Thing in Common The Atlantic - Wed, Jul 15, 2015 8:01 AM EDT

    A recent report from the real-estate research company Zillow looked at Federal Reserve Board data on young adults aged 23-34 and found that of the 46 percent of Millennials who pursued post-secondary education (that’s everything from associates degrees to doctorates), about 61 percent received some financial help with their …

  • The Camera Behind the New Pluto Photos The Atlantic - Tue, Jul 14, 2015 5:30 PM EDT

    For decades after its discovery in 1930, Pluto looked like nothing more than a gray smudge in the abyss of space. After a nine-year journey from Earth, New Horizons took hundreds of images in mere hours on Tuesday—images that will fill textbooks and museum exhibits for decades, as well as help scientists figure out how …

  • What's So Great About Being a Planet? The Atlantic - Tue, Jul 14, 2015 1:19 PM EDT

    Which means that whatever Pluto actually is, its essential Plutoness, is not reliant on whether some humans who live billions of miles away from it decide to call it a planet. Does it even matter what we call Pluto? Pluto’s planetary status has prompted much debate in the past decade.

  • Shoppers buy more junk food when they bring their own bags The Atlantic - Tue, Jul 14, 2015 7:49 AM EDT

    For the study, Uma Karmarkar, a professor of marketing at Harvard Business School, and Bryan Bollinger, a professor of marketing at Duke’s Fuqua School of Business, analyzed loyalty-card data from some 140,000 trips to a single grocery store in California in the mid-2000s.

  • Fewer than 10 days ago, Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras had the Greeks vote on a proposal put forth by the Eurogroup on June 26 that included adding additional austerity measures, such as cuts to pensions and benefits, in order to trim the country’s budget. Tsipras and then-Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis urged the people …

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