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Financial News from The Atlantic

  • The first and last rule of prices is that nobody knows what anything is worth . Shoppers are guided by shallow clues ("this is cheaper than that") and latent emotions ("it feels like a good ...

  • Shop Yourself Happy The Atlantic - 12 hours ago

    This year, a few pure souls might celebrate a freegan Christmas . Some will opt for a "Buy-Nothing" holiday. Others still will pull off a DIY Hanukkah . The vast majority of people who have some ...

  • Black Friday has become American ritual, as American as the day that precedes it. Each year, the shopping extravaganza brings schadenfreude-worthy videos and news photos of greedy stampeders jostling each ...

  • With Thanksgiving, the holidays have begun in earnest, ushering in an uneasy season of guilt borne partly of over-consumption: too much shopping, too much pie (if such a thing even exists), and too much ...

  • The Food Industry's Least Appetizing Ads The Atlantic - 20 hours ago

    I love food technology because it's such a strange combination of things: process engineering, flavor science, and things I ate yesterday. So, every Thanksgiving, I write a bunch of stories about how we ...

  • The Sound Recorder That Changed Film The Atlantic - 20 hours ago

    Stefan Kudelski didn't set out to make a sound recorder. He was interested in robotics, and in the 1950s, one of the ways to create robotic memory was to use magnetic tape. As a student, working with that ...

  • The Geography of Gratitude The Atlantic - Wed, Nov 26, 2014 5:32 PM EST

    Satya Murthy/Flickr What are you thankful for? For Facebook users who recently passed around a status-update game, the answer was pretty clear: friends, family, and health. The analysis was released Tuesday ...

  • How Turkeys Got Supersized The Atlantic - Wed, Nov 26, 2014 1:04 PM EST

    Thanksgiving, the most food-focused of American holidays, provides a hearty occasion for this reminder: The dominant fruits, vegetables, and animals in modern farming are products of highly unnatural selection. ...

  • A New Business Strategy: Treating Employees Well The Atlantic - Wed, Nov 26, 2014 7:30 AM EST

    NORWICH, Vt.–Call centers are not, typically, very happy places—especially around the holidays. Workers have quotas to make, and often sit in bleak cubicles, headsets on, plowing through calls from stressed ...

  • 9 Wild Inventions That Modernized Thanksgiving The Atlantic - Wed, Nov 26, 2014 7:00 AM EST

    While you probably associate Thanksgiving with homecooked food made around the hearth, inventors have long been working on ways to modernize the family meal. Here, we present nine real patents—from an ...

  • Recalculating: The Mind and the Map The Atlantic - Wed, Nov 26, 2014 7:00 AM EST

    The mere mention of Boston inspires dread in my family. On one infamous trip from our home in upstate New York to a Boston wedding, we were done in by a single step in the directions sent by family friends. ...

  • Could You Hand Draw a Map of Your Hometown? The Atlantic - Wed, Nov 26, 2014 7:00 AM EST

    We all like to think we know our towns and cities pretty well. I, for example, can tell you every bar in my neighborhood and which ones are gross and which ones charge too much for beer. I could draw you ...

  • There's a Better Way to Board Planes The Atlantic - Wed, Nov 26, 2014 6:00 AM EST

    ‘Tis the season for airplane travel. We may be looking forward to getting where we’re going, but most aspects of the travel itself are merely endured. There’s stressful security, the madding crowd, and ...

  • Spatchcocking: The Silly Word Behind the Turkey Trend The Atlantic - Tue, Nov 25, 2014 10:50 AM EST

    Americans have been cooking Thanksgiving turkeys for more than 100 years . But it’s only the last few when a radical innovation in turkey preparation has started to become mainstream: “Spatchcocking,” ...

  • When Raising the Minimum Wage Isn't Enough The Atlantic - Tue, Nov 25, 2014 10:34 AM EST

    BURLINGTON, Vt.—Johann Kulsic arrived in this city with an optimistic feeling that he’d finally begun his ascendancy to the middle class. He’d been accepted into the University on Vermont with a partial ...

  • How Budweiser Lost Millennials The Atlantic - Tue, Nov 25, 2014 8:15 AM EST

    A couple of decades ago, Budweiser, owned by ABInbev, was the best-selling beer in the United States, and the brand your snobby European relatives brought up when insulting American beer. But according ...

  • When to Book Your Plane Ticket: A Guide The Atlantic - Tue, Nov 25, 2014 7:30 AM EST

    How airlines price tickets is a source of many myths and urban legends. These include tips about the best day of the week to buy a ticket, last-minute discounts offered by the airlines, and the conspiracy ...

  • Confessions of a Private Eye The Atlantic - Tue, Nov 25, 2014 6:45 AM EST

    “Investigator maintained visual contact of the subject.” I became a private investigator in the 80s. When I started out, I had a pair of binoculars and a 35mm Pentax SLR with a zoom lens. I sat in the ...

  • The Sound of a Cosmic Touchdown The Atlantic - Mon, Nov 24, 2014 7:03 PM EST

    If a spacecraft lands on a comet 330 million miles away, and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? Yes, it does. And now we have a recording of it. Last week the European Space Agency released ...

  • Behavioral Economics Conquered Books—Can It Be a Hit on TV? The Atlantic - Mon, Nov 24, 2014 12:53 PM EST

    Each weekday, I take the elevator up to the Atlantic office in New York City—an unremarkable detail, except our office is on the second floor, and this is an act of profound laziness. When I press the ...

  • FYI, See Below The Atlantic - Mon, Nov 24, 2014 12:45 PM EST

    Email is the worst, but some emails are worse than others. The worst emails are forwards. And the worst forwards? Not the jokes your uncle sends you from his AOL account, but the ones your boss or your ...

  • Can Your Job Help Your Brain Age More Gracefully? The Atlantic - Mon, Nov 24, 2014 12:29 PM EST

    For the most part, I've never felt self-conscious about my memory skills until I heard of the world of memory championships . With intense training and special techniques , memory champions can memorize ...

  • Is This the Ultimate Flexible Workplace? The Atlantic - Mon, Nov 24, 2014 10:42 AM EST

    It's been 10 years since Jody Thompson and Cali Ressler put police tape across the entrances to their cubicles and walked away for good. "We got this tape that said, 'Cube Free.' And we said, 'We're ...

  • Is the Future of Zoos No Zoos at All? The Atlantic - Mon, Nov 24, 2014 9:46 AM EST

    For my bat mitzvah, I adopted a whale named Onyx . They sent me a photo of her tail so that I could recognize her, but I prudently left that at home when I went on a whale-watching trip. Even to a tween, ...

  • When Is the Best Time of Day for a Company to Dump Bad News? The Atlantic - Mon, Nov 24, 2014 7:35 AM EST

    Market watchers have long griped about companies that try to bury their bad news by releasing it late on a Friday afternoon. Earnings shortfalls, product recalls, outlandish severance deals—these things ...

  • In August, The New York Times ran an essay by Sam Tanenhaus that sought to sketch a comprehensive portrait of Millennials. Tanenhaus, who labeled Millennials monolithically as "Generation Nice," ...

  • Blog of Myself The Atlantic - Sun, Nov 23, 2014 7:00 AM EST

    I was looking at the Internet the other day, and I thought, “Wow, there are so many personal essays out here! I should write an essay about how writers are increasingly making themselves part of the story, ...

  • The jobs of security guards—and possibly police, down the road—might be in jeopardy thanks to a new robot that hit the pavement this week in Silicon Valley. Designed by the Mountain View startup Knightscope ...

  • Happiness at Work: What Matters Most? The Atlantic - Sat, Nov 22, 2014 8:00 AM EST

    Most Americans say they are satisfied with their job, but pay, schedules, and the opportunity to advance remain sore spots for many, with the large percentage of adults whose work doesn't follow the traditional ...

  • A Time Capsule on the Moon The Atlantic - Sat, Nov 22, 2014 7:00 AM EST

    A decade from now, if all goes well, a spacecraft with a high-tech drill will land in the South Pole-Aitken basin of the moon. There, it will bore 66 feet down into the surface and collect samples of the ...

  • The Scary Merry Mistletoe Drone The Atlantic - Fri, Nov 21, 2014 5:53 PM EST

    According to legend, Alan Stillman had one goal in mind when he founded T.G.I. Friday's, the neighborhood casual franchise that now boasts nearly a thousand outposts. "It seemed to me that the best ...

  • Salmon, Fresh From the Warehouse The Atlantic - Fri, Nov 21, 2014 5:36 PM EST

    If middle-class Americans can afford salmon in 20 years, they might get it through a process like this: The salmon hatch in nurseries. Eventually they are transferred to open tanks. The fish spend their ...

  • The Economics of Thanksgiving Dinner The Atlantic - Fri, Nov 21, 2014 1:34 PM EST

    From negotiating family politics at the dinner table to managing the misery of holiday travel, the entire Thanksgiving enterprise is fraught with challenges for which we're supposed to be grateful. (And, ...

  • Is Cheating a Part of Banking Culture? The Atlantic - Fri, Nov 21, 2014 10:22 AM EST

    In college, I heard the words investment banking as early as my first year. It was 2004, I remember recruiters in nice suits arriving on campus to court the brightest economics students to work at their ...

  • The Economic Case Against Majoring in Fun Things The Atlantic - Fri, Nov 21, 2014 7:30 AM EST

    For many, the reality of student debt doesn’t hit home until you make your first payment. Though you may have read your paperwork and done the math on how much monthly debt repayment will cost, in practice, ...

  • I Don't Have Babies But I'm Obsessed With Baby Names The Atlantic - Fri, Nov 21, 2014 6:45 AM EST

    Writers are largely preoccupied with words, rolling them around like unpolished rocks in our minds and on the page until smooth, glistening sentences emerge. For some, it can take a painstaking amount ...

  • The Original Galaxy Quest The Atlantic - Fri, Nov 21, 2014 6:45 AM EST

    One of the amazing things about astronomy is that it mostly involves standing at one distinct point in the entire universe—Earth—and measuring properties of the light that happens to reach us here. That ...

  • The Secret Life of String Cheese The Atlantic - Fri, Nov 21, 2014 6:45 AM EST

    Brian Baker is obsessed with string cheese. He talks about it poetically, rambling about the string factor, the machines that pump out individual-sized ropes, the flavor profile of the stick. But Brian’s ...

  • Next Year, One Billion Works Will Be Free to Use Online The Atlantic - Thu, Nov 20, 2014 6:52 PM EST

    Sometime in 2015, the number of works licensed under Creative Commons agreements will surpass the 1-billion mark, the organization which stewards the licenses announced Thursday. The prediction came in ...

  • The High Tech of Small-Batch Cheese The Atlantic - Thu, Nov 20, 2014 3:26 PM EST

    In many cities these days, cheeses described as “small-batch” and “artisanal” dot the shelves of farmer’s markets the supermarkets alike. These descriptors probably conjure images of an aproned farm maid ...

  • The Man Who First Juiced The Atlantic - Thu, Nov 20, 2014 1:30 PM EST

    Norman W. Walker died in 1985, when he was 99 years old… or 104 … or 118 . It depends on whom you ask. Wikipedia takes a skeptic's view of Walker and says he died at 99. There's some evidence that's correct. ...

  • Finally a Better Way to Text GIFs The Atlantic - Thu, Nov 20, 2014 12:36 PM EST

    GIFs, it must be said, are no fad anymore. A few years ago, it seemed as though the entire Internet was rediscovering the decades-old format all at once. No longer did the Graphical Image Format just look ...

  • Why Don't All Hotels Provide Free Wi-Fi? The Atlantic - Thu, Nov 20, 2014 11:43 AM EST

    For hotel guests, wi-fi is no longer a luxury like infinity pools, designer toiletries, or complimentary dry cleaning. Business travelers increasingly consider it a necessity, just as important as bottled ...

  • Are You Happy With Your Job? The Atlantic - Thu, Nov 20, 2014 10:04 AM EST

    Americans don’t exactly have the rosiest outlook on the current state of the country, but in talking about their own lives, it turns out that most feel fairly optimistic about their careers and future ...

  • The Gender-Wage Gap Is Shrinking—or Is It? The Atlantic - Thu, Nov 20, 2014 8:40 AM EST

    The wage gap between young male and female workers is historically low. The wage gap between young male and female workers is growing. Yes, both things can be true at the same time. Intergenerational economic ...

  • Zen and the Art of Cubicle Living The Atlantic - Thu, Nov 20, 2014 8:00 AM EST

    One day recently I worked out of, quite possibly, the best office I have ever been in. Granted, this is not a high bar for a cubicle drone like me. Still, the design touches were lovely: It was a glass ...

  • Can David Still Sue Goliath? The Atlantic - Thu, Nov 20, 2014 7:45 AM EST

    Katlyn Beggs, a 2009 alum of the California School of Culinary Arts, calls herself one of the lucky ones: After graduating, she got a job. How did she get so lucky? Partly by having worked in the food ...

  • The New Work of Words The Atlantic - Thu, Nov 20, 2014 7:00 AM EST

    The word is a popular thing. Charismatic, even. Of all the parts of our language, it sticks out grandly. As such, it’s the easiest to tell stories about: The provenance of the word “entrepreneur” is also ...

  • The Very First Forecast The Atlantic - Thu, Nov 20, 2014 6:45 AM EST

    Robert FitzRoy was the captain of The Beagle— yes, that Beagle — and, as a captain, he was particularly concerned about the weather. Who wouldn't be? Judge a barometer reading inaccurately, and your ship ...

  • Americans Still Use the Whole Pig The Atlantic - Thu, Nov 20, 2014 6:45 AM EST

    Livestock have always been more than just slabs of meat. Traditionally, the inedible parts, like beef fat, were rendered to make products like soap and candles. It's a common refrain from sustainability ...

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