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Financial News from The Atlantic

  • The New Editors of the Internet The Atlantic - 9 hours ago

    Bowing to their better civic natures, and the pleas of James Foley's family, Twitter and YouTube have pulled down videos and photos of his murder.

  • Is Technology Shifting Our Moral Compass? The Atlantic - 10 hours ago

    Read Is Technology Shifting Our Moral Compass? on theatlantic.com More From The Atlantic Working From Home Seems More Legitimate If You Have a Kid 41 Percent of American Workers Let Paid Vacation Days ...

  • For women, there are major drawbacks to requesting to work remotely, according to a new study by Christin Munsch, a sociologist at Furman University. The effect was especially pronounced for men. The women were judged similarly regardless of the reason they gave for working from home.

  • Travel Association, four in 10 American workers allow some of their paid vacation days to go unused and expire—even though 96 percent of workers claim to see the virtue in taking time off. Another report, from 2013, found that workers were letting an average of 3.2 vacation days expire, unused.  Travel Association is …

  • Yes, Florida has more sinkholes than any other state in the nation, according to the local agency that oversees insurance regulations and compliance. Sinkholes have been spotted at least three times in as many months—May in Winter Haven, June in Jonesville, and July in Spring Hill.  One technology that could help: a new …

  • We’re now at that stage of Facebook where users are some combination of bored and anxious. Mat Honan at Wired spent 48 hours Liking everything he saw. Adam Powers, a designer and writer (and a friend of mine) recently released a Chrome extension he calls “Neutralike.” It strips your friends' Facebook posts of the Like …

  • Baby Boomers Are Still Playing Words With Friends The Atlantic - Thu, Aug 21, 2014 6:55 PM EDT

    Baby Boomers still use Yahoo Mail. Mobile apps are now the most popular form of computing in the United States, period—more time is spent tapping away at screens than typing on desktop computers—and the report tries to give a marketer’s sense of the American app market, assessing the most popular genres of apps and whether …

  • What Is Pandora Doing Right? The Atlantic - Thu, Aug 21, 2014 4:16 PM EDT

    All summer long, leading tech companies have been trumpeting slash apologizing for the numbers that show how few women and people of color most of them employ.  The typical gender breakdown seems to be about 70-30 men-to-women (Google, Facebook, Twitter)—with some companies slightly more balanced (LinkedIn, Yahoo, eBay) …

  • The Glorious Year Before the Internet Ransacked Hollywood The Atlantic - Thu, Aug 21, 2014 2:22 PM EDT

    Hollywood is experiencing one of its worst summers at the U.S. Many consider 1939 to be Hollywood’s “golden year”—the year of Gone With the Wind, The Wizard of Oz, and Stagecoach. On a scale of $14 billion (*to date) (Data: Box Office Mojo, BLS Calculator) The rapper Eminem made a movie, and it was actually quite good. Hugely …

  • The Next Generations of Facebook's News Feed The Atlantic - Thu, Aug 21, 2014 1:16 PM EDT

    The outcome of algorithmic sorting is only partly clear—you know what you see, you don't know what you don't see. And the logic of that information filtering is hidden. What if, instead of relying on platforms like Facebook to invisibly turn the digital knobs that make each person's News Feed look different, Facebook users …

  • Social Media Ruined Shark Week The Atlantic - Thu, Aug 21, 2014 11:31 AM EDT

    My family and I had just settled in to watch a segment of Discovery Channel's Shark Week—I Escaped Jaws II, a harrowing report about people who have survived shark attacks—when up popped the on-screen feed of Facebook posts and tweets from other viewers tuning in. “It's chilling, I'm on the edge of my seat,” came the news …

  • Study: Nobody Is Paying Attention on Your Conference Call The Atlantic - Thu, Aug 21, 2014 10:54 AM EDT
    Meeting

    Clayton Kershaw in 2014? Browser tabs and Excel charts extend across my two computer screens like the dashboard of a junior analyst. The answer is coming into focus when, suddenly, a voice from the phone shocks me back into reality... A new survey from Intercall, the largest international conference call company, finds …

  • The Primary Way to Report Harassment on the Social Web Is Broken The Atlantic - Thu, Aug 21, 2014 7:30 AM EDT

    See any of those four very different things on a social media site and you pretty much have only one technical option: You can hit a button to mark the content as objectionable, ‘flagging’ it for review by the site’s moderators. It’s a feature as simple as it is widespread. Vine, YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter all implement …

  • The Way We Report Harassment on the Social Web Is Broken The Atlantic - Thu, Aug 21, 2014 7:30 AM EDT

    See any of those four very different things on a social media site and you pretty much have only one technical option: You can hit a button to mark the content as objectionable, ‘flagging’ it for review by the site’s moderators. It’s a feature as simple as it is widespread. Vine, YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter all implement …

  • The Primary Way to Report Harassment Online Is Broken The Atlantic - Thu, Aug 21, 2014 7:30 AM EDT

    See any of those four very different things on a social media site and you pretty much have only one technical option: You can hit a button to mark the content as objectionable, ‘flagging’ it for review by the site’s moderators. It’s a feature as simple as it is widespread. Vine, YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter all implement …

  • Where the Five-Day Workweek Came From The Atlantic - Thu, Aug 21, 2014 7:25 AM EDT

    Its obsolescence has been foretold for quite a while now: A 1965 Senate subcommittee predicted Americans would work 14-hour weeks by the year 2000, and before that, back in 1928, John Maynard Keynes wrote that technological advancement would bring the workweek down to 15 hours within 100 years.  There’s reason to believe …

  • There Still Isn't One Good Way to Represent the Internet in Art The Atlantic - Thu, Aug 21, 2014 7:05 AM EDT

    The writer Quinn Norton has spoken of the same problem in prose writing. “Right now,” she said in early 2013, “my field must tackle describing a world where falling in love, going to war, and filling out tax forms looks the same;

  • The Modest Pleasure of Boxed Wine The Atlantic - Thu, Aug 21, 2014 7:00 AM EDT

    With the gentle pressure of my finger on the rubber spigot, the cardboard box on the kitchen counter steadily fills a glass with pinot noir. I know from experience that lugging four bottles of wine home from the store is less pleasant than toting a slender box.

  • The Island Nation That Planned to Relocate an Entire Population The Atlantic - Thu, Aug 21, 2014 6:59 AM EDT

    Mikarite Temari, the mayor of Christmas Island, Kiribati’s largest atoll, rolled his eyes and shook his head as I read off my laptop in his office what his president, Anote Tong, had said during a visit to New York. “According to the science and the projections,” Tong, a slim 62-year-old with a trimmed mustache, a gray …

  • The Island Nation That Plans to Relocate an Entire Population The Atlantic - Thu, Aug 21, 2014 6:59 AM EDT

    Mikarite Temari, the mayor of Christmas Island, Kiribati’s largest atoll, rolled his eyes and shook his head as I read off my laptop in his office what his president, Anote Tong, had said during a visit to New York. “According to the science and the projections,” Tong, a slim 62-year-old with a trimmed mustache, a gray …

  • The Island Nation That Bought a Back-Up Property The Atlantic - Thu, Aug 21, 2014 6:59 AM EDT

    Mikarite Temari, the mayor of Christmas Island, Kiribati’s largest atoll, rolled his eyes and shook his head as I read off my laptop in his office what his president, Anote Tong, had said during a visit to New York. “According to the science and the projections,” Tong, a slim 62-year-old with a trimmed mustache, a gray …

  • A Secret Code in Google Translate? The Atlantic - Wed, Aug 20, 2014 4:09 PM EDT

    It had to do with the service’s treatment of “Lorem Ipsum” placeholder text—the string of Latin words that people use to block out space for text on websites and in other designs before meaningful verbiage is added. For some reason, strings of “Lorem Ipsum” were coming back as “NATO.” In his post, Krebs works through a …

  • How Much Should You Know About How Facebook Works? The Atlantic - Wed, Aug 20, 2014 12:40 PM EDT

    Every semester, Cornell professor Jeff Hancock asks his students to complete an experiment. First, he has them all Google the same search term. What his students inevitably find, and what stuns many of them, he says, is how feeding Google an identical phrase can yield wildly different results. "They think your Google …

  • So What Exactly Is a 'Killer Robot'? The Atlantic - Wed, Aug 20, 2014 7:25 AM EDT

    In 1942, Isaac Asimov published a short story called Runaround that both coined the term "robotics" and introduced the idea of robots killing humans. Clearpath Robotics announced that it would take a stand against killer robots. “To the people against killer robots: we support you,” the company’s press release reads.  …

  • Would the Chance at a Cash Prize Get More People to Vote? The Atlantic - Wed, Aug 20, 2014 7:15 AM EDT

    When the 2012 Los Angeles mayoral election rolled around, about 23 percent of registered voters showed up, down from 37 percent in 2001. Some district elections later saw turnout rates of as little as 15 percent—numbers that Los Angeles’s City Council president, Herb Wesson, called “abysmal” and “embarrassing.” Arizona …

  • Are Rabbits Pets or Meat? The Atlantic - Wed, Aug 20, 2014 7:09 AM EDT

    No one is talking about selling kittens and puppies at the meat counter, but for the group of bunny-loving pet owners protesting near the Whole Foods in Union Square, they might as well be. “Boycott Whole Foods,” they say, “because they’re killing rabbits.” Earlier this year, after developing its own welfare standards, …

  • Blend Up the Internet and Everything Turns Orange The Atlantic - Wed, Aug 20, 2014 6:22 AM EDT

    If you ask Jim Bumgardner what his job is, he might say puzzles . But he also might say software development, or art, or “Mayor of the North Pole” (at least on Foursquare ). Or he might just point you ...

  • If you ask Jim Bumgardner what his job is, he might say puzzles . But he also might say software development, or art, or “Mayor of the North Pole” (at least on Foursquare ). Or he might just point you ...

  • How One Woman Deciphered Her Own Genetic Mutation The Atlantic - Tue, Aug 19, 2014 4:47 PM EDT

    Kim Goodsell was running along a mountain trail when her left ankle began turning inward, unbidden. She got a frosty reception.

  • Your Sushi Could Be Getting Smarter The Atlantic - Tue, Aug 19, 2014 12:43 PM EDT

    Americans end up throwing away tons of food—thousands of dollars' worth per grocery store each day, according to one report—in an abundance of caution, and then many of them get sick anyway.  While a best-by date might hint at when the dish was prepared, an electronic label gives a much more precise backstory of the fish's …

  • Your Sushi May Be Getting Smarter The Atlantic - Tue, Aug 19, 2014 12:43 PM EDT

    Americans end up throwing away tons of food—thousands of dollars' worth per grocery store each day, according to one report—in an abundance of caution, and then many of them get sick anyway.  While a best-by date might hint at when the dish was prepared, an electronic label gives a much more precise backstory of the fish's …

  • Google Knows You Better Than You Know Yourself The Atlantic - Tue, Aug 19, 2014 8:01 AM EDT

    Google Now was doing its job. Google Now, in case you don’t know, is the flagship software embedded in the Android smartphone operating system (it’s also available on iOS); Let’s be real: Google knows so much about me already. For me, Google Now is strange and neat and vital.

  • The Thing Employers Look For When Hiring Recent Graduates The Atlantic - Tue, Aug 19, 2014 8:00 AM EDT

    When I was 17, if you asked me how I planned on getting a job in the future, I think I would have said: Get into the right college. When I was 18, if you asked me the same question, I would have said: ...

  • The Tax Dodge That Has Plagued the U.S. for More Than a Decade The Atlantic - Tue, Aug 19, 2014 7:42 AM EDT

    A little more than a decade ago, a company called Stanley Works was considering moving to Bermuda in order to save some money. Stanley, a tool-manufacturing company, had done some calculations, and figured out that it could save about $30 million per year in U.S.

  • Why the World Smells Different After It Rains The Atlantic - Mon, Aug 18, 2014 5:49 PM EDT

    "Petrichor" is the wonderful word that describes the wonderful scent of the air after a rain shower. It comes, like so many wonderful words do, from the ancient Greek: a combination of ichor, the "ethereal essence" the Greeks believed flowed through the veins of their gods, and petros, the stones that form the surface of …

  • What If Emoji Lived Among Us? The Atlantic - Mon, Aug 18, 2014 12:55 PM EDT

    Read What If Emoji Lived Among Us? on theatlantic.com More From The Atlantic Working From Home Seems More Legitimate If You Have a Kid 41 Percent of American Workers Let Paid Vacation Days Go to Waste ...

  • 118 Years Ago, The New York Times Crowdsourced a New Motto The Atlantic - Mon, Aug 18, 2014 11:31 AM EDT

    Though it may seem like a product of the Internet, crowdsourcing has been around for ages. Take, for example, an experiment run by The New York Times in 1896, when the newspaper decided it was time to ...

  • What an Introvert Sounds Like The Atlantic - Mon, Aug 18, 2014 10:30 AM EDT

    Do our Facebook posts reflect our true personalities? A team of University of Pennsylvania scientists is using Facebook status updates to find commonalities in the words used by different ages, genders, and even psyches. “Governments have an increased interest in measuring not just economic outcomes but other aspects …

  • The Joys and Sorrows of Late-Night Email The Atlantic - Mon, Aug 18, 2014 9:07 AM EDT

    At 10:13 PM last night, I sent Atlantic  assistant editor Joe Pinsker an email to say I was writing an article about all the after-work time we spend on email. Before the clock struck 10:14, Joe had replied: ...

  • The Wonderful, Weird Economy of Burning Man The Atlantic - Mon, Aug 18, 2014 7:15 AM EDT

    The busiest time of year for the Reno-Tahoe International Airport is not Thanksgiving, or Christmas, or any of the other major national holidays. Every year in late August, the 66th busiest airport in America becomes a doorstep to the annual festival, which manifests and disappears a week later in Nevada’s nearby Black …

  • In a retired shore station for transpacific communications cables on the western coast of Vancouver Island sits a military computer in a padlocked cage. It's the sort of cage you might otherwise use to lock up automatic rifles or expensive electronics at a big box store, but this cage is protecting data—classified signals …

  • Twitter Starts to Change the Central Logic of Its Service The Atlantic - Sun, Aug 17, 2014 10:47 AM EDT

    When will Twitter no longer be Twitter?  According to Mashable, Twitter is altering the timeline of a small number of users, so that they see tweets from accounts they don’t follow. Earlier this week, I was flicking through my Twitter timeline and found something odd: a tweet from a user I’d never seen before. This new …

  • What Is the Price of Perfect Equality? The Atlantic - Sun, Aug 17, 2014 7:50 AM EDT

    Specifically, we have young adult literature, and its fascination with the way that the world is made, unmade, and remade.  In The Giver, society has "solved" inequality by dramatically reducing personal property and having the state distribute what's left. (This is not the sort of solution that might be recommended by …

  • ​How Much Racial Profiling Happens in Ferguson? The Atlantic - Fri, Aug 15, 2014 3:52 PM EDT

    In 2013, the Ferguson Police Department made 5,384 stops and 611 searches. The racial disparity captured by these numbers is unacceptable, but it is not as easy to make sense of the injustice as it might seem. Are they solely a reflection of racist law enforcement actions? UCLA's Center of Policing Equity has been called …

  • Why Bottled Water Comes From California, Which Can't Spare Much The Atlantic - Fri, Aug 15, 2014 1:38 PM EDT

    The details of where and how bottling companies get their water are often quite murky, but generally speaking, bottled water falls into two categories. The first is "spring water," or groundwater that's collected, according to the EPA, "at the point where water flows naturally to the earth's surface or from a borehole …

  • Why Did the Ice Bucket Challenge Go Big? Boston The Atlantic - Fri, Aug 15, 2014 12:33 PM EDT

    Where did the ice bucket challenge came from? According to Facebook, more than 15 million people have posted, commented, or liked a post about the challenge. It has raised more than $2.3 million to support research to fight amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease). Someone challenges you to the ice …

  • Wait, Is That a Human on the Moon? The Atlantic - Fri, Aug 15, 2014 11:43 AM EDT

    In this age of big surveillance and miniature satellites, there is an idea that—once we are able to track everything around us—the magic and mystery of the universe will be replaced with data, knowledge, and understanding.  Sure enough, go to Google Moon and find the coordinates (27° 34' 12.83'' N, 19° 36'21.56 W) and …

  • How Uber Helps Women Break Into the Taxi Industry The Atlantic - Fri, Aug 15, 2014 9:31 AM EDT

    After scores of cab rides in New York City, Southern California, Seville, Paris, San Francisco, and Las Vegas, I hadn't been picked up by a single woman. In New York City, just one percent of taxi drivers are female, according to the Wall Street Journal. The gender disparity exists despite the fact that women are, statistically …

  • The Many Ways Twitter Is Bad at Responding to Abuse The Atlantic - Thu, Aug 14, 2014 4:30 PM EDT

    Hundreds of tributes have already been written since the world learned of Robin Williams’ death by suicide on August 11. His 25-year-old daughter, Zelda Williams, wrote a beautiful farewell to her father on Instagram, including a quote from Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince:

  • Women Are More Likely to Secure Kickstarter Funding Than Men The Atlantic - Thu, Aug 14, 2014 1:34 PM EDT

    A study published last month, authored by New York University’s Jason Greenberg and the University of Pennsylvania’s Ethan Mollick, recommends an alternative for women seeking venture-capital money: Kickstarter. Greenberg and Mollick analyzed 1,250 Kickstarter projects, dividing them into categories of those whose founders …

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