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Financial News from The Atlantic

  • A Snap Is a Postcard The Atlantic - 10 hours ago

    Snapchat is back in the news again. It is propelled mostly by a $10-billion valuation and the whispery success of Snapchat Discover, which lets a couple lucky media companies promote tiny swipe-magazines of video and text to every single person who uses the app.

  • Will Camels Roam Canada Again? The Atlantic - 10 hours ago

    A perfect self-driving car doesn’t exist yet, nor has the world solved global warming. In 1995, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change declared that it was “more likely than not” the case that global warming was caused by human activity.

  • ZUMANITY By Cirque du Soleil Brings Sexy To The Strip With Exciting Outdoor Performance At New York-New York Hotel & Casino

    LAS VEGAS—There's been a lot of hubbub about the effort tech whiz Tony Hsieh and his crack team of acolytes have put into revitalizing downtown Las Vegas. In case you missed it, Hsieh, the CEO of Zappos, in January 2012 announced that he was putting $350 million into the Downtown Project, which would fund new businesses …

  • The U.S. is one of only four countries in the world—along with Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Papua New Guinea—that does not guarantee the right to paid maternity leave. Considering that women today hold less than 20 percent of leadership positions in corporate America, according to a 2015 report by Colorado Women’s College, …

  • How Student Debt Stunts Financial Growth The Atlantic - Sun, Mar 1, 2015 8:00 AM EST

    There was a time when conventional wisdom said that student debt is not a problem in and of itself—rather, “high” debt of $100,000 or more is the more pressing concern. A staggering percentage of Americans do not pay their student debt, no matter how big or small. Analysis reveals that 34 percent of students with just …

  • A Cure for Colorblindess The Atlantic - Sun, Mar 1, 2015 6:00 AM EST

    The Oxy-Iso colorblindness correction medical glasses allow me to pass the Ishihara, one of the most common tests for colorblindness. A 53-year-old ex-marine told me he broke down in tears when he saw the red in a brick building for the first time using EnChroma glasses.

  • A Farewell to Mallrats The Atlantic - Sat, Feb 28, 2015 7:30 AM EST

    A few months ago I went to a mall in Maryland, because it has an Old Navy and an Olive Garden, and I wanted to buy pants and eat pasta alone. On Wednesday, a judge in Oakland County, Michigan, granted permission for the owner of Northland Center mall, outside of Detroit, to shut it down. The Northland Center is not alone—since …

  • Suits and Hoodies: The Two Cybersecurity Cultures The Atlantic - Fri, Feb 27, 2015 1:24 PM EST

    When Admiral Michael S. Rogers, director of the National Security Agency, Cyber Command Commander, and recipient of the Navy Distinguished Service Medal recently walked into a cybersecurity conference, his uniform bore 20 ribbons and four badges from his esteemed Navy career. Kevin Bankston, policy director of the Open …

  • What Happens When You Strap a Camera to a Sea Turtle's Shell The Atlantic - Fri, Feb 27, 2015 9:14 AM EST

    Marine biologists have long known that leatherbacks like to chow down on jellies, but they never knew precisely how. Researchers from the non-profit organization the Canadian Sea Turtle Group use the tiny “turtle-cams” to gain insight into the sea turtle’s foraging habits off the coast of Nova Scotia. “It’s like getting …

  • #TheDress and the Rise of Attention-Policing The Atlantic - Fri, Feb 27, 2015 8:55 AM EST

    It caused Taylor Swift to feel “confused and scared.” It caused a rupture in the Kardashian-West household that might never be repaired. 2) [sic] that dress is gold and white.” It caused the rest of us to question our sanity and our friends and the nature of reality.

  • Bad weather: Better for work, terrible for everything else The Atlantic - Fri, Feb 27, 2015 7:50 AM EST
    Frigid Conditions Persist In New York City

    Researchers Jooa Julia Lee, Francesca Gino, and Bradley Staats looked at how weather affects worker productivity at a Japanese bank, online, and in the lab. They hypothesized that good weather is distracting because "attractive outdoor options is a form of task-unrelated thinking that serves as a cognitive distraction …

  • As Coworking Spaces Scale, Can They Keep Their Communal Vibe? The Atlantic - Fri, Feb 27, 2015 7:30 AM EST

    Shared workspaces first started as informal arrangements: Freelancers with extra space in their garage invited friends to work with them and groups of freelancers leased office space together to make it more affordable. A host of companies has stepped in to cater to this segment of the population by offering freelancers …

  • The Ping to Prayer The Atlantic - Fri, Feb 27, 2015 6:20 AM EST

    Looming over the palatial interior of the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque, in Abu Dhabi’s central district, are nine multi-faceted digital clocks shaped like flowers. This journey towards co-existence pushes onward at a gradual pace: older and younger generations feeling their way forward, attempting to find the right balan …

  • The Ultimate Net-Neutrality Reading List The Atlantic - Thu, Feb 26, 2015 6:16 PM EST

    You've likely already heard the big tech news of the day: The FCC voted to approve reclassification of broadband as a public utility and—wait, wait, where are you going? Come back! Net neutrality, I have ...

  • The New Net-Neutrality Policy, in Three Simple Phrases The Atlantic - Thu, Feb 26, 2015 3:26 PM EST

    The U.S. Federal Communications Commission just adopted strict net-neutrality rules that will treat the Internet like a public utility. What’s in the new regulations? There are three major principles that ...

  • What Blogging Has Become The Atlantic - Thu, Feb 26, 2015 12:53 PM EST

    This is a post about Medium, which is a fascinating company partly because it has a lot of money, and partly because its leadership team first brought you Blogger (the first really successful blogging tool) and Twitter (Twitter), and which released a whole slate of new features this week in a kind of confusing way. My …

  • The Designer Who Humanized Corporate America The Atlantic - Thu, Feb 26, 2015 11:00 AM EST

    “Visual communications of any kind … from billboards to birth announcements, should be seen as the embodiment of form and function: the integration of the beautiful and the useful,” wrote Paul Rand (1914-1996) in 1947's Thoughts on Design. Now, a portion of this tremendous body of work is on display at the Museum of the …

  • Refrigerators of the World The Atlantic - Thu, Feb 26, 2015 10:30 AM EST

    One of the many wonderful things about Sweden is that each week, the country hands over its official Twitter feed to a different Swede, to tweet their Swedish thoughts and do their Swedish bidding. Most ...

  • The Clooney Effect The Atlantic - Thu, Feb 26, 2015 10:26 AM EST

    "When even a lifelong bachelor like George Clooney settles down, you know things are changing," writes Fisher of her tongue-in-cheek term, which recalls the actor's marriage to Amal Alamuddin, an accomplished human-rights barrister. Becker actually wrote a chapter for the book.

  • Jet Lag Is Worse on Mars The Atlantic - Thu, Feb 26, 2015 7:40 AM EST

    “All the times you wish you had another hour of the day, you almost have that on Mars,” said Jennifer Trosper, deputy project manager for NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity. She has worked on Mars time with four Mars rovers. Scientists, Mars rover drivers, and everyone else in the space community call the Martian day a “sol” …

  • White Privilege, Quantified The Atlantic - Thu, Feb 26, 2015 7:35 AM EST

    Similar chasms exist when it comes to perceived discrimination in stores, the courts, and schools, which means that much of the nation's dialogue about racial inequality is defined by the clashing of intractable subjectivities. They were then asked to record whether the driver let them stay onboard.

  • When Your Religion Makes You Too Uncool to Work at Abercrombie The Atlantic - Thu, Feb 26, 2015 6:45 AM EST

    When she was 17, Samantha Elauf applied to work at an Abercrombie Kids store in Tulsa. When the hiring manager saw Elauf's headscarf, she realized that it violated Abercrombie's official Look policy, so she had to ask the district manager whether they could make an exception. On Wednesday, the Supreme Court heard oral …

  • Using Technology to Outsource Human Memory The Atlantic - Wed, Feb 25, 2015 9:55 AM EST

    With all the #tbts and #fbfs—also known as Throwback Thursdays and Flashback Fridays—as well as that NewsFeed-topping Year in Review feature on Facebook, social networks seem intent on making its users remember the past. Timehop cofounder Jonathan Wegener says the app has 14 million users, about half of which check the …

  • Starbucks's Failed Music Revolution The Atlantic - Wed, Feb 25, 2015 8:44 AM EST

    Starbucks will stop selling CDs at the end of the month, and it isn't hip to cry about it. In this long era of music-sales decline, Starbucks represented the possibility that album shopping could again be a physical experience for a mass market.

  • Why the Gap Between Worker Pay and Productivity Is So Problematic The Atlantic - Wed, Feb 25, 2015 7:30 AM EST

    When you look at the relationship between worker wages and worker productivity, there's a significant and, many believe, problematic, gap that has arisen in the past several decades. I spoke with Jan W. Rivkin, an economist and senior-associate dean for research at Harvard Business School who studies labor markets and …

  • Me, Myself, and Authenticity The Atlantic - Wed, Feb 25, 2015 7:01 AM EST

    Those who go looking for evidence of increasing self-absorption seem to find it everywhere these days. Inflated egos are apparently smiling in the selfies people snap, self-obsession woven into their compulsive ...

  • How Smartphones Hurt Sleep The Atlantic - Tue, Feb 24, 2015 12:25 PM EST

    Smartphones do seem to be having an impact on how well we snooze, and this effect seems to be especially severe among young people.

  • A Story That Could Only Be Told Online The Atlantic - Tue, Feb 24, 2015 11:11 AM EST

    Almost six years ago, Andrew Hussie began another one of a series of webcomics on his website, MS Paint Adventures. Homestuck tells the story of a group of online friends who start playing a video game that both dooms their world and creates a new one. From a narrative standpoint, Homestuck has roots in participatory …

  • Sobering News Out of China, Part 4 Million The Atlantic - Tue, Feb 24, 2015 8:45 AM EST

    Last week I mentioned the latest chapter in the Chinese government's efforts to seal the country off from the rest of the Internet—and what I considered an out-of-date report in The Guardian about the situation. The Chinese part works very, very well ... it's only when you try to access overseas content, no matter how …

  • Sobering News Out of China, Part Four Million The Atlantic - Tue, Feb 24, 2015 8:45 AM EST

    Last week I mentioned the latest chapter in the Chinese government's efforts to seal the country off from the rest of the Internet—and what I considered an out-of-date report in the Guardian about the situation. The Chinese part works very, very well...it's only when you try to access overseas content, no matter how innocuous, …

  • Is Anything Trendy Anymore? The Atlantic - Tue, Feb 24, 2015 8:08 AM EST

    Some artists are popular, of course: Taylor Swift and Beyoncé bestride the Earth. In last week’s T Magazine, pegged to New York Fashion Week, former New York Times fashion critic Cathy Horyn admitted she didn’t know what was trendy either.

  • How 14,000 Workers Managed to Slow Down the Entire Economy The Atlantic - Tue, Feb 24, 2015 7:35 AM EST

    “Sometimes on trains I play a numbers game,” writes Rose George in her perceptive 2013 book about cargo ships. George’s game was to take quick stock of a stranger's visible possessions, and then estimate how many of those possessions had made their way from factory to consumer via container ships.

  • Why Are People Still Building Sprawl? The Atlantic - Tue, Feb 24, 2015 7:30 AM EST

    LAS VEGAS—A decade ago, home builders put up thousands of new spacious stucco homes in the desert here, with marble countertops, ample square footage, and walk-in kitchen cupboards. Then the recession hit, the values of these homes plummeted, and economists talked of the overbuilding of Las Vegas. Now, though, developers …

  • Why Are Developers Still Building Sprawl? The Atlantic - Tue, Feb 24, 2015 7:30 AM EST

    LAS VEGAS—A decade ago, home builders put up thousands of new spacious stucco homes in the desert here, with marble countertops, ample square footage, and walk-in kitchen cupboards. Then the recession ...

  • How to Send a Message 1,000 Years to the Future The Atlantic - Tue, Feb 24, 2015 6:13 AM EST

    “Now I am become death, the destroyer of worlds.” It was fitting that J. Robert Oppenheimer, one of the physicists who helped design the atomic bomb, chose to quote from the Bhagavad Gita in response to the first successful detonation of a nuclear weapon in the remote sands of New Mexico. The Gita, one of the most venerated …

  • Why Tech Valuations Just Keep Getting Bigger The Atlantic - Mon, Feb 23, 2015 6:46 PM EST

    "High valuations are an indication of markets," the venture capitalist Eric Hippeau, who is a managing director at Lerer Hippeau Ventures, told me. "One of the reasons why these numbers get really, really, really, very high, very quickly is now we have a true global economy." What that means from a tech company's perspective …

  • Finally, Emoji People of Color The Atlantic - Mon, Feb 23, 2015 4:14 PM EST

    The next system update for Apple Mac and iOS devices will let users type emoji with a variety of skin tones, a beta software release revealed Monday.

  • How Dirty Money Gets Into Banks The Atlantic - Mon, Feb 23, 2015 12:18 PM EST

    In the fallout of the 2008 financial crisis, the habits of Wall Street—and more broadly, the banking industry worldwide—became front and center in the media: From excessive risk taking, to rate rigging, and actively helping clients evade taxes. Stephen Platt, an expert on financial-crime prevention, argues that as the …

  • Why People Probably Won't Pay to Keep Their Web History Secret The Atlantic - Mon, Feb 23, 2015 10:39 AM EST

    If consumers in Kansas are willing to pay an extra $30 per month for super-fast fiber-optic Internet access, the telecom giant won’t track their online browsing for targeted ads. "Since we began offering the service more than a year ago the vast majority have elected to opt-in to the ad-supported model," Gretchen Schultz, …

  • The Guardian Angels of Student Debt The Atlantic - Mon, Feb 23, 2015 10:27 AM EST

    Student debt in the country now amounts to a gargantuan $1.16 trillion—an increase of $31 billion from the previous year. The number of students who are unable to repay their loans isn’t very encouraging, either. About 11 percent of student debt today is either delinquent or in default. The strike is being carried out …

  • The Luxury Liner of the Future The Atlantic - Mon, Feb 23, 2015 8:00 AM EST

    Watching the process of loading a cruise ship is a bewildering spectacle of logistics and organization. Which is a sort of nice way of saying: There’s a lot of junk that gets loaded onto a cruise ship. Witnessing the loading process in and around the new Quantum of the Seas is all the more intriguing, then, when you realize …

  • How Skiing Went From the Alps to the Masses The Atlantic - Mon, Feb 23, 2015 7:35 AM EST

    Triple gold-medalist Alpine skier Jean-Claude Killy of France, O.J. Simpson, and Chevrolet executive John Z. DeLorean sit at a table, while Hunter S. Thompson takes notes from the side of the stage. So what was a 25-year-old from the French Alps doing with these two American icons, hawking a special edition “Killy Z-28 …

  • Minneapolis's White Lie The Atlantic - Sat, Feb 21, 2015 8:00 AM EST

    In August 1973, Time magazine ran a cover of Minnesota Governor Wendell Anderson proudly holding up a fish. The accompanying story called Minnesota a “state that works,” and promised “The Good Life in Minnesota.” More recently, though, that cover motivated reflection on whether the state still deserves the moniker. Derek …

  • A Google Spreadsheet for Your Thoughts The Atlantic - Fri, Feb 20, 2015 6:07 PM EST

    What are you thinking right now, at this moment in time? That's what Laura Olin asked last week in Everything Changes, her delightful newsletter that, well, changes in format, theme, and frequency each ...

  • Why Photos of Space Should Belong to Everyone The Atlantic - Fri, Feb 20, 2015 10:33 AM EST

    In the early evening of February 11, a Falcon 9 rocket, owned and operated by Elon Musk’s private spaceflight company SpaceX, applied 1.3 million pounds of thrust to its launch pad in Cape Canaveral, Florida. It would now attempt to travel farther into outer space than any SpaceX vehicle had gone before. The launch went …

  • A Time Machine in the Mojave Desert The Atlantic - Fri, Feb 20, 2015 10:01 AM EST

    The sign said, “Dedicated to Research in Life Extension.” George Van Tassel, an aviator and UFOlogist, put it outside a structure he described as “a time machine for basic research on rejuvenation, anti-gravity, and time travel” in the Mojave Desert in the early 1950s. In fact, the story of George Van Tassel’s Integratron, …

  • Legally married, but their boss disagrees The Atlantic - Fri, Feb 20, 2015 8:00 AM EST
    Same-sex marriage

    Call it a little ditty about Jackie and Diana: Jacqueline Cote and Diana Smithson met on Cape Cod in 1992, fell in love, and moved to Maine together in 1998. They both got jobs at Walmart, working side by side in the bakery department. They both continued to work in various positions at Walmart stores. The following …

  • Solving a Museum’s Bug Problem With Legos The Atlantic - Fri, Feb 20, 2015 7:49 AM EST

    The Natural History Museum in London has a gargantuan task ahead: the mass digitization of its sprawling collections. “Every time you pick one of these up on a pin, there’s a chance they will break because they are very brittle,” said Steen Dupont, an entomologist at the museum. Dupont wanted something that was cheap, …

  • Even With Debt, College Still Pays Off The Atlantic - Fri, Feb 20, 2015 7:30 AM EST

    Widespread unemployment among recent college graduates during, and following, the recession combined with climbing student-loan debt, has left many wondering whether or not a college education is a good or necessary investment after all. According to data from the New York Fed, college graduates earn 80 percent more than …

  • Why Walmart Raised Its Wages The Atlantic - Thu, Feb 19, 2015 4:12 PM EST

    The CEO of Walmart announced earlier today that all of the company’s employees will, starting in April, be paid at least $9 an hour, nearly $2 more than the federal minimum wage. Walmart’s CEO framed the raise as an act of corporate benevolence, but the reason his company will inch closer to paying all its employees fair …

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