Roger Ebert's 10 Favorite Movies

Business Insider

Kevin Winter/Getty

Legendary film critic Roger Ebert passed away Thursday, at the age of 70, after a long battle with cancer.

Ebert  reviewed movies for the  Chicago Sun-Times  for 46 years and on TV for 31 years. His reviews were also syndicated in hundreds of newspapers worldwide.

In 2012 the critic compiled his last list of the greatest films of all time.

Here they are below:

"Aguirre, Wrath of God" (Herzog)
"Apocalypse Now" (Coppola)
"Citizen Kane" (Welles)
"La Dolce Vita" (Fellini) 
"The General" (Keaton) 
"Raging Bull" (Scorsese) 
"2001: A Space Odyssey" (Kubrick) 
"Tokyo Story" (Ozu) 
"The Tree of Life" (Malick)
"Vertigo" (Hitchcock)

Ebert's most recent list switched in  Terrene Malick's  "Tree of Life" for Krzysztof Kieslowski's "Dekalog."

Here's what he had to say about each one:

"Aguirre, Wrath of God" (1972)

New Yorker

Chicago Sun-Times

"'Aguirre' is the most evocative expression of Herzog's genius, and I admire it even more after watching him go through it a shot at a time with Ramin Bahrani a few years ago at Boulder."

"Apocalypse Now" (1979)

MGM

Chicago Sun-Times :

"' Apocalypse Now' is a film which still causes real, not figurative, chills to run along my spine, and it is certainly the bravest and most ambitious fruit of Coppola's genius."

"Citizen Kane" (1941)

RKO

WSJ:

"Welles gives us a portrait of a gargantuan man of unlimited ambitions and appetites, whose excesses outran his resources."

"La Dolce Vita" (1960)

Koch-Lorber Films

Chicago Sun-Times:

" A film about a kind of life I dreamed of living, then a film about the life I was living, then about my escape from that life. Now, half a century after its release, it is about the arc of my life, and its closing scene is an eerie reflection of my wordlessness and difficulty in communicating."

"The General" (1920)

United Artists

Chicago Sun-Times :

"There must be a silent film [on the list], and I consider "The General" his [Buster Keaton's] best."

"Raging Bull" (1980)

MGM

Chicago Sun-Times :

"Many would choose 'Taxi Driver' as Scorsese's greatest film, but I believe 'Raging Bull' is his best and most personal, a film he says in some ways saved his life. It is the greatest cinematic expression of the torture of jealousy — his 'Othello.'"

"2001: A Space Odyssey" (1968)

MGM

Chicago Sun-Times :

"'2001: A Space Odyssey' is likewise a stand-alone monument, a great visionary leap, unsurpassed in its vision of man and the universe."

"Tokyo Story" (1953)

Shochiku


Chicago Sun-Times :

"The older I grow and the more I observe how age affects our relationships, the more I think 'Tokyo Story' has to teach us."

"Vertigo" (1958)

Paramount Pictures


Chicago Sun-Times :

"One of my shifts last time was to replace Hitchcock's "Notorious" with "Vertigo," because after going through both a shot at a time during various campus sessions, I decided that "Vertigo" was, after all, the better of two nearly perfect films."

"The Tree of Life" (2011)

Fox Searchlight


Last year, Ebert added "The Tree of Life" to his list of greatest films over Charlie Kaufman's " Synecdoche , New York" because it is

"... more affirmative and hopeful. I realize that isn't a defensible reasons for choosing one film over the other, but it is my reason, and making this list is essentially impossible, anyway."



More From Business Insider

Rates

View Comments (15)