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In this photo of Tuesday Oct. 30, 2012 a Somali charcoal truck loaded with sacks of charcoal arrive in Mogadishu. Thousands of sacks of dark charcoal sit atop one another in Somalia's southern port city of Kismayo, an industry once worth some $25 million dollar a year to the al-Qaida-linked insurgents who controlled the region. The good news sitting in the idle pile of sacks is that al-Shabab militants can no longer fund their insurgency through the illegal export of the charcoal. Kenyan troops late last month invaded Kismayo and forced out the insurgents, putting a halt to the export of charcoal, a trade the U.N. banned earlier this year in an effort to cut militant profits. The loss of the charcoal trade "will cut a major source of revenue and thus will have a detrimental effect on their operational capacity to carry out large scale attacks," Mohamed Sheikh Abdi, a Somali political analyst, said of al-Shabab. But the flip side to the charcoal problem is that residents who made their living from the trade no longer are making money, a potentially tricky issue for the Kenyan troops who now control the region. (AP Photo/Farah Abdi Warsameh)

Associated Press
In this photo of Tuesday Oct. 30, 2012 a Somali charcoal truck loaded with sacks of charcoal arrive in Mogadishu. Thousands of sacks of dark charcoal sit atop one another in Somalia's southern port city of Kismayo, an industry once worth some $25 million dollar a year to the al-Qaida-linked insurgents who controlled the region.  The good news sitting in the idle pile of sacks is that al-Shabab militants can no longer fund their insurgency through the illegal export of the charcoal. Kenyan troops late last month invaded Kismayo and forced out the insurgents, putting a halt to the export of charcoal, a trade the U.N. banned earlier this year in an effort to cut militant profits. The loss of the charcoal trade "will cut a major source of revenue and thus will have a detrimental effect on their operational capacity to carry out large scale attacks," Mohamed Sheikh Abdi, a Somali political analyst, said of al-Shabab.  But the flip side to the charcoal problem is that residents who made their living from the trade no longer are making money, a potentially tricky issue for the Kenyan troops who now control the region.  (AP Photo/Farah Abdi Warsameh)
In this photo of Tuesday Oct. 30, 2012 a Somali charcoal truck loaded with sacks of charcoal arrive in Mogadishu. Thousands of sacks of dark charcoal sit atop one another in Somalia's southern port city of Kismayo, an industry once worth some $25 million dollar a year to the al-Qaida-linked insurgents who controlled the region. The good news sitting in the idle pile of sacks is that al-Shabab militants can no longer fund their insurgency through the illegal export of the charcoal. Kenyan troops late last month invaded Kismayo and forced out the insurgents, putting a halt to the export of charcoal, a trade the U.N. banned earlier this year in an effort to cut militant profits. The loss of the charcoal trade "will cut a major source of revenue and thus will have a detrimental effect on their operational capacity to carry out large scale attacks," Mohamed Sheikh Abdi, a Somali political analyst, said of al-Shabab. But the flip side to the charcoal problem is that residents who made their living from the trade no longer are making money, a potentially tricky issue for the Kenyan troops who now control the region. (AP Photo/Farah Abdi Warsameh)
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