2013 tax code changes

CNBC's Sharon Epperson talks about what your year-end strategy should be with new tax code changes.

  • Business

    Gilead sinking stock price calls out for new rescue plan

    There was a time when the underperformance of Gilead Sciences' (GILD) stock price was viewed as an opportunity to buy shares of a historically great biotech company at a discount. But Gilead's stock price continues to fall, trading today where it did two years ago. The value play looks more like a trap. Investors once okay with waiting patiently for a Gilead rebound are growing frustrated, even angry, at the company's lack of progress. (I wrote about the challenges to Gilead's M&A growth strategy in July.) It's reaching the point now where Gilead CEO John Milligan (and before him, John Martin) is at risk of losing his perennial status as biotech's best, most trusted CEO. "Investors have broadly

    The Street
  • Lifestyle

    We officially know when Tower of Terror is closing at Disneyland, so start saying goodbye

    Write this down: The last time you’ll be able to *drop* in on Tower of Terror at Disneyland is January 2nd, 2017. Since all good (and terrifying) things must come to an end eventually, earlier today the Disney Parks Blog made the official Tower of Terror announcement. To prepare for the brand new Guardians of the Galaxy ride that will take the place of the 13-story drop, Tower of Terror will no longer be accepting new hotel guests after the start of next year.

    Hello Giggles
  • Entertainment

    Peyton Manning Took A Shot At Tom Brady During Rob Lowe's Comedy Central Roast

    Retirement hasn't taken the fight out of Peyton Manning. If you had told me you’d be at Rob Lowe’s Comedy Central roast — which airs Labor Day — doing Tom Brady jokes, I would have helped you out free of charge.

    UPROXX
  • World

    Comey: FBI wants 'adult conversation' on device encryption

    FBI Director James Comey warned again Tuesday about the bureau's inability to access digital devices because of encryption and said investigators were collecting information about the challenge in preparation for an "adult conversation" next year. Widespread encryption built into smartphones is "making more and more of the room that we are charged to investigate dark," Comey said in a cybersecurity symposium. The remarks reiterated points that Comey has made repeatedly in the last two years, before Congress and in other settings, about the growing collision between electronic privacy and national security.

    Associated Press
  • Business

    4 Numbers That Help You Plan for a Secure Retirement

    Two-thirds of 401(k) participants polled for a recent J.P. Morgan Asset Management report said they could better plan for retirement if their employers helped them “understand their numbers”—that is, get a handle on such specifics as how much they should be saving and how much money they should have in retirement accounts to ensure a secure post-career life. Here are four key numbers that can make retirement planning less daunting and at the very least get you going in the right direction until you come up with a more customized plan. Indeed, this report from the Boston College Center for Retirement Research estimates that’s how much the typical U.S. household should save each year in order to maintain its pre-retirement living standard in retirement.

    Money
  • Business

    Here are the 3 reasons gold isn't $2,000 an ounce

    Gold has surged in 2016 against a backdrop of political uncertainty and consistently low interest rates, but it has not broken past its 2011 high. Gold is up 24% year-to-date, a performance bettered in the past 12 years only in 2011 at the height of the eurozone sovereign-debt crisis. Gold is a popular asset in 2016.

    Business Insider UK
  • News

    How Much Trump's Campaign Pays Trump-Owned Companies

    Donald Trump's campaign has directed at least $15 million to companies linked to him or his children or to reimbursing his children's travel. WSJ takes a look at which companies have been recipients of the campaign's cash. Photo: Getty

    WSJ Live
  • Business

    Joe Sutter, father of the 747, passes away at 95

    In addition to the 747, Sutter worked on projects including the 737 and 707 aircraft models, Boeing Commercial Airplanes chief executive officer Ray Conner said in a message to employees. Sutter and his team became known as "the Incredibles," for producing the world's largest airplane within 29 months from the time of conception. Sutter served the company as a consultant after his retirement from the company in 1986.

    Reuters
  • Business

    5 Things That Aren’t Worth Going Into Debt For

    When you’re paying off debt — and the interest that comes with it — you’re giving someone else money that you could be saving. In other words, debt payments are money you’re not investing in your future.

    Money
  • Business

    Wells Fargo: Buy Now…Or Forever Hold Your Peace

    As part of KBW’s ongoing August Opportunity series, we are highlighting Outperform-rated Wells Fargo as an investment that we believe investors should be increasing while the opportunity still presents itself. Wells Fargo has been the worst-performing Universal Bank stock this year but we are maintaining the stock as our Best Idea, and at the current valuation we believe that shares of Wells Fargo are cheap relative to peers and investors should be adding shares to portfolios. Shares of Wells Fargo have lagged peers year to date, and Wells is now the worst-performing Universal Bank stock this year. The end result is that Wells Fargo is now trading at 11.6x our 2017 EPS estimate and this is 71% of the market multiple.

    Barrons
  • Business

    Cramer: Wall Street's greatest mispricing I have ever seen

    "The wholesale wrongness of the dollar store stocks going into this quarter is one of the greatest mispricings I have seen in ages." -Jim Cramer The shifting environment includes price competition from Wal-Mart, price deflation hitting all supermarkets, the 10 percent price reductions on average for 450 of Dollar General's best-selling items and the 500,000 people who lost federal food stamp eligibility. "I would normally want to take an interest in a high-quality company like Dollar General after such a huge decline, but what this decline tells me is that we are dealing with a gigantic reset," Cramer said. There are too many questions lingering for Cramer. Were more people than 500,000 affected

    CNBC.com
  • Business

    Cramer: Fake out! How Deere fooled everyone

    It is a rare occasion when it occurs, but sometimes Jim Cramer is downright stunned by a company. That happened less than two weeks ago when Deere reported results and sent shock waves through the stock market. "Even more surprising than Deere's strength was the fact that nobody seemed to see it coming. Nearly everyone assumed the end markets were so bad that there was nothing the company could do to compensate," the "Mad Money" host said. Until it reported, agricultural equipment maker Deere had subpar performance, basically flat for 2016. That narrative abruptly changed on Aug. 19 when it reported a quarter that sent the stock soaring 13 percent in a single session. "It gave us the mother of

    CNBC.com
  • Business

    Fox News calls ex-anchor Andrea Tantaros a 'wannabe' sexual harassment victim

    Fox News on Monday denied claims made by former anchor Andrea Tantaros, who filed a lawsuit earlier this month saying she was taken off the air in April in retaliation for complaining about advances from former chairman Roger Ailes. The network called Tantaros an "opportunist" piggybacking off the publicity of an earlier sexual harassment lawsuit filed against Ailes by former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson. In a filing made Monday in a New York state court, lawyers for Fox News said Tantaros' lawsuit "bears all the hallmarks of the 'wannabe,'" and said she signed an agreement to keep employment-related disputes out of court. In her lawsuit, Tantaros said the alleged harassment began in 2011, with Ailes making comments about her looks and asking her to "twirl" for him, Reuters reports.

    The Week
  • Business

    What Donald Trump's Tax Returns Won't Tell Us, But Hillary Clinton's Do

    Voters would like to poke through Donald Trump’s tax returns, but they can’t. After some earlier waffling and mixed signals, Trump’s camp now seems firm that his big tax audit prevents him from releasing his returns. Outside of a Presidential campaign, his audit defense is a pretty good one, whatever the IRS or the public might say. A letter from Trump’s tax lawyers confirmed there was an ongoing tax audit for 2009 and later. Anyone who has ever been through a tax audit might have some sympathy.  Still, many voters aren’t likely to give him a free pass. As a candidate for President, the conventional answer is that Trump should release them, even though there is no legal requirement. Trump says

    Forbes
  • Business

    What Happens to Your Credit Score When You Buy a House?

    If you've just bought a new home, chances are you spent quite some time worrying about your credit score. After all, your credit score affects your ability to get a mortgage, and the interest rate you'll pay on that mortgage. You'll likely start seeing minor dings in your credit score as soon as you begin applying for mortgages.

    Credit.com
  • Business

    ‘Rich Dad’ author Robert Kiyosaki: If you’re investing for the long term, ‘you’re crazy’

    Robert Kiyosaki, author of several best-selling books including “Rich Dad Poor Dad,” joined MarketWatch for a live interview on Facebook today. He offered up insights on making money, becoming an entrepreneur and even touched on politics. Here are some highlights from the talk, or you can listen to the full interview here. His advice on how to get rich: “The rich do not work for money. Most people do not understand that, because they’re taught to go to school and get a job for money. The rich don’t work for money. Check out: Get ready for a 5%-10% stock-market drop And one of the reasons for that is money is no longer money. One of the reasons for that is in 1971, President Nixon took the U.S.

    MarketWatch
  • Politics

    Trump flies to Mexico and JetBlue flies to Cuba

    Donald Trump wants to talk with Mexico's President just hours before the Republican candidate gives a major address on immigration in Arizona. And flying to Cuba just got a lot easier and cheaper for Americans.

    Yahoo Finance Video
  • Business

    Chipotle hopes these freebies will get customers to bite

    Chipotle Mexican Grill is working hard to win back customers of all ages. The burrito chain said Tuesday that it will offer two new promotions during the month of September, one for college students and another for families. That's on top of the chain's limited-time Chiptopia loyalty program, which dishes out free entrees after a set number of purchases. The string of promotions come as the casual dining chain tries to boost sluggish sales and foot traffic in its restaurants, which have yet to recover from a series of high-profile foodborne illness outbreaks last year. Chipotle's same-store sales plunged nearly 30 percent in the first quarter, when it reported its first quarterly loss as a public

    CNBC.com
  • Business

    Bill Gross: The Fed has mastered market manipulation

    The Federal Reserve, with its bargain-basement interest rates and money printer always on standby, is manipulating financial markets and crushing capitalism, bond king Bill Gross said in his latest broadside against the U.S. central bank. The criticisms come as the Fed is weighing whether to raise interest rates after years of keeping them anchored in efforts to stimulate the economy and create inflation. Instead, Gross said, the Fed has merely inflated asset prices while actually harming the economy.

    CNBC
  • GOOGL

    Google's Diane Greene is on the verge of scoring a huge I-told-you-so

    It's fashionable in certain tech circles these days to diss Google's cloud efforts as being too little too late, while Amazon soars ahead, and Microsoft nips at its heels. Over the last year, she has revamped the company's cloud organization so that it can get invited to the table when corporations choose a cloud provider. And to make sure Google has the stuff to win the deals.

    Business Insider
  • BAC

    Trader bets $1.2 million on Bank of America – and could make a 633 percent profit

    Bank of America's summer surge has some traders betting on further upside for the stock. The trade was made when Bank of America (BAC) was trading at around $15.90, and it has a break-even level of $16.12. If the stock closes below $16 on Friday, the entire $1.2 million spent in options premium will be lost.

    CNBC
  • Business

    Icahn: Ackman is backed into a corner on Herbalife

    Billionaire investor Carl Icahn rejected any assertion Tuesday that he is backed into a corner on troubled nutritional supplement company Herbalife (HLF). In fact, he said it's his long-time rival, Bill Ackman , who has the far more tenuous position. "If anyone should feel boxed in, it's Ackman," Icahn said in an exclusive interview with CNBC.com.

    CNBC
  • AAPL

    Cramer: Apple's chart is the worst in the book, but I'm not selling

    One of Jim Cramer's Twitter followers asked him on Monday night if he is turning on Apple (NASDAQ: AAPL), and he took it personally. "I said on air that Apple's chart was the worst in the book," the " Mad Money " host said. Before the news broke that the European Union slapped Apple with a $14.5 billion tax bill, Cramer saw that the charts for Apple were struggling.

    CNBC
  • Business

    4 Big Retirement Regrets That You Should Avoid

    The closer you get to retirement, it seems, the more pressure there is to plan ahead. But how do you know if you're coming up with the right answers when you're facing life-changing questions—and there's so little room for error? When should you stop working? How much money should you have saved? How can you make sure that money lasts? Sometimes failure is the best teacher. When I talk to retirees, they frequently bring up their regrets—things they say they'd do differently if they could. Here are a few of the more common mistakes retirees make that we all can learn from: 1. They called it quits too soon. After decades of working, it's tough not to dream of the day when you can retire. People

    Kiplinger.com
  • Politics

    White House names members of Puerto Rico control board

    The White House on Wednesday announced the members of a new oversight board to help manage Puerto Rico's debt-stricken economy, with President Barack Obama expressing confidence that the panel can turn around a dire financial situation. Legislation passed in June set up the control board and required the White House to choose from a list recommended by Republican and Democratic congressional leaders by September. Similar to a board that oversaw the District of Columbia in the late 1990s, the panel's seven members will oversee negotiations with creditors and the courts over reducing some of Puerto Rico's roughly $70 billion debt.

    Associated Press