The FedEx Ship Slips

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Stocks To Watch: The FedEx Ship Slips, General Mills Bowls A Strike

  • In gas drilling country, the honeymoon is over on royalties
    Business
    Associated Press

    In gas drilling country, the honeymoon is over on royalties

    Jan Brown pores over his royalty statement and wonders where all the money went. A few months ago, the nation's second-largest natural gas producer siphoned $2,201 worth of gas from his 240-acre property — but paid him only $359 after taking deductions for transportation and processing. Brown, 59, who relies on the royalties as his sole source of income, says the deductions are outrageous and claims his lease forbids them.

  • Business
    The Drive

    Multimillionaire Gym Mogul Crashes Lamborghini Murciélago, Kills Uber Driver

    J. Gerald Smith, an 82-year old Uber driver, died this week after a yellow Lamborghini Murciélago struck his Buick Enclave, which was sitting at a stop sign. Roger Wittenberns, the 60-year old multimillionaire health club mogul, was behind the wheel of the Murciélago at the time of the wreck. Mr. Smith was a retired real estate agent.

  • Discount supermarkets are taking over the US
    Business
    Business Insider

    Discount supermarkets are taking over the US

    America's largest supermarkets are slashing prices amid ongoing food-price deflation and growing pressure from the rapid expansion of discount-grocery chains like Aldi. The price cuts are squeezing profits and dragging down company shares. Kroger, Whole Foods, Sprouts Farmers Market, and Dollar General have seen their stock prices drop a collective 13% in the last three months.

  • Giant Biotech and Energy Insider Buys Highlight Wild Market Week: Chesapeake Energy, Cheniere Energy, Phillips 66 and More
    Business
    247wallst.com

    Giant Biotech and Energy Insider Buys Highlight Wild Market Week: Chesapeake Energy, Cheniere Energy, Phillips 66 and More

    Once again, the roller-coaster that is the stock market took investors on a wild ride, and this time is was mostly higher. A massive rally shot all the indexes higher and erased virtually all the earlier losses that had been racked up in September. One thing is for sure, the sell-offs that hit earlier in the month got some insiders interested in shares, and like the week before, they were out again in force last week. We cover insider buying each week at 24/7 Wall St., and we like to remind readers that while insider buying is usually a very positive sign, it is not in of itself a reason to run out and buy a stock. Sometimes insiders and 10% owners have stock purchase plans set up at intervals

  • 25 highest-earning graduate schools
    News
    The Street

    25 highest-earning graduate schools

    Editors' pick: Originally published Sept. 20. If you're hunting for a graduate program (because a grad degree is the new bachelor's degree these days), or want to confirm that you made the right choice in selecting one, payscale.com has posted its annual salary report that details, among other things, the 25 schools whose graduates earn the most. These top 25 constitute schools that award MBAs and JDs (noticeably missing are PhDs, whose degrees apparently didn't make the cut), and two numbers are listed for each school -- median early career pay (graduates within five years of getting their diplomas) and median mid-career pay (10 years or more of experience). "Pay," in this survey, includes wages,

  • News
    Oilprice.com

    What If The Oil Rebound Never Happens?  

    Oil prices are hovering in the mid-$40s per barrel, and the hopes of a rebound have once again been delayed. The IEA’s September Oil Market Report predicts that the supply/demand equation might not come into balance until next year, suggesting another year of low oil prices. The question seems ridiculous, not only because the oil markets always go through booms and busts, but also because demand continues to rise.

  • Ignore Procter & Gamble: Here Are 3 Better Stocks -- The Motley Fool
    Business
    The Motley Fool

    Ignore Procter & Gamble: Here Are 3 Better Stocks -- The Motley Fool

    Procter & Gamble (NYSE:PG) is a titan of the household products industry. The company is nearly 200 years old, worth more than $200 billion, and owns well-known brand names such as Tide, Gillette, and Pampers.  But the company has struggled recently. It's sold off secondary brands like Duracell, Cover Girl, and Zest to cut costs and focus on its core brands. Moreover, the company's once-strong pipeline of innovation has yielded little success, and spending on R&D as a percentage of sales is lower than it's been in almost any point in the last 20 years. The Crest-maker's sales have fallen as it has shed brands, struggled to grow domestic sales, and faced a strengthening dollar. The stock is up

  • News
    WSJ Live

    Police Release Video of Keith Lamont Scott Shooting

    Charlotte-Mecklenburg authorities released police dash and body camera videos on Saturday, depicting the shooting death of Keith Lamont Scott by officers on Sept. 20, 2016. The family of Mr. Scott released video shot by his wife on Friday. Photo: Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department

  • Trim your wireless bill -- skip that phone upgrade
    Technology
    CNET

    Trim your wireless bill -- skip that phone upgrade

    It's hard to teach an old dog new tricks. Wireless subscribers have been conditioned to get a new phone every two years. That made sense back in the day, when wireless subsidies from mobile operators let you upgrade to the latest iPhone or Samsung Galaxy for only $200. Those days are over. Today consumers are expected to pay full price for their devices. The carriers have tried to make the hefty $650 price tag of high-end devices more palatable by offering payment plans. But wireless subscribers shouldn't confuse these plans with the old device subsidies. In this edition of Ask Maggie, I explain why, in this new era of wireless, you'll spend considerably more if you continue your device-upgrade-every-two-years

  • 5 Mistakes to Avoid During Open Enrollment
    Business
    Consumer Reports

    5 Mistakes to Avoid During Open Enrollment

    Whether you get your health insurance through your employer, Medicare, or one of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) exchanges, there’s a good chance you’re paying more than you need to. According to a study last year by the National Bureau of Economic Research, 63 percent of the 50,000 employees at a Fortune 100 company selected a health plan that was not the most cost-effective option. Why are so many people electing insurance plans that aren’t the best fit?

  • Politics
    Bloomberg

    Ex-Thai PM Yingluck Should Pay $1 Billion Fine, Committee Says

    Former Thailand Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, whose government was ousted in a military coup in 2014, should be fined about 35 billion baht ($1 billion) for overseeing a program to buy rice from farmers above market rates, a state-appointed committee recommended. The proposed penalty amounts to about 20 percent of the 178 billion baht that the rice-purchase programs in 2012 and 2013 cost the country, Manas Jamveha, director general of the Comptroller General’s Department, told reporters Saturday. The committee appointed to look into the issue ruled it was an abuse of power and that Yingluck was negligent in overseeing the program while she was in power, said Manas, the commitee’s chairman.

  • AAPL
    Bloomberg

    Apple Is Now Boring Enough to Buy for $37 Billion Stock Sifter

    Apple Inc. losing steam only makes it a bargain. The iPhone maker is cheap and the risk is lower, according to Robert Naess, who oversees 33 billion euros ($37 billion) in stocks at Nordea Bank, Scandinavia’s largest bank. “Apple is boring now,” he said in an interview at Nordea’s offices in Oslo Thursday.

  • Business
    Benzinga

    Rite Aid, Walgreens' Merger Could Total 11% Return This Year

    In late 2015, Walgreens Boots Alliance Inc (NASDAQ: WBA) announced it was acquiring competitor Rite Aid Corporation (NYSE: RAD) for $9.00 share. The deal was expected to be completed in the second half of 2016, but there's still no word on the deal

  • Wells Fargo customers recall their shock upon discovering fraudulent accounts
    Business
    Ethan Wolff-Mann

    Wells Fargo customers recall their shock upon discovering fraudulent accounts

    Take Micheline Maynard, a journalist and author based in Boston, one of the millions of Wells Fargo victims. Unbeknownst to her, she said, that brief interaction with Wells Fargo had resulted in a $30,000 line of credit created in her name. When she was in the financing process of relocating to Boston from Michigan, her mortgage broker called and said one of the underwriters had raised concerns over the amount of outstanding lines of credit in her name.

  • Business
    Bloomberg

    Asian Futures Tip Mixed Day as Oil Rises Amid Algiers Countdown

    Asian index futures diverged, with contracts on Australian stocks falling while those in Japan rose as the optimism that followed last week’s central bank decisions was tempered. U.S. crude rallied after sliding the most in two months, amid indications Saudi Arabia may agree to cut output to January levels at this week’s much-anticipated producer talks in Algiers. Turkey’s lira extended losses, dropping to its weakest level since the start of August, after Moody’s Investors Service reduced the nation’s credit rating to junk.

  • Business
    Bloomberg

    Kuwait Needs ‘Optimal’ Market for Planned Dollar Debt Sale

    Kuwait needs “optimal market conditions’’ for its planned sale of international debt sale, Finance Minister Anas Al-Saleh said, as the OPEC member seeks to repair public finances squeezed by low oil prices.“The intention is to establish Kuwait’s presence

  • California eyes unusual power source: its gridlocked roads
    Science
    Associated Press

    California eyes unusual power source: its gridlocked roads

    All those cars on California’s famously gridlocked highways could be doing more than just using energy - they could be producing it. The California Energy Commission is investing $2 million to study whether piezoelectric crystals can be used to produce electricity from the mechanical energy created by vehicles driving on roads. Scientists already know the technology works, but the state needs to figure out whether it can produce high returns without costing too much.

  • World
    WSJ Live

    Police Hunt for Suspected Mall Shooter in Washington State

    Police are hunting for a suspected shooter after five people were killed in an attack at a mall in Washington state on Friday night. Photo: AP

  • Business
    Bloomberg

    Contagion Risks Rise as Chinese Banks Fund Each Others’ Lending

    China’s smaller banks have never been more reliant on each other for funding, prompting rating companies to warn of contagion risks in any crisis. Wholesale funds, including those raised in the interbank market, accounted for a record 34 percent of small- and medium-sized bank financing as of June 30, compared with 29 percent on Jan. 31 last year, Moody’s Investors Service estimated in an Aug. 29 note that analyzed central bank data. CLSA Ltd. estimates total debt may reach 321 percent of gross domestic product in 2020 from 261 percent in the first half, while the Bank for International Settlements also warned lenders are at risk from surging leverage.

  • Business
    Benzinga

    Cuts, Raises, Suspensions And Specials: The Week In Dividends

    Dividends are one of the returns investors expect from the company. Let's take a look at the companies that have made changes to their dividend rates in the week between September 19 and 22. September 19 U.S. Bancorp (NYSE: USB) increased its quarterly

  • Q&A: A mortgage exec reflects on housing market's challenges
    Business
    Associated Press

    Q&A: A mortgage exec reflects on housing market's challenges

    From the outside, the housing market looks solid: Sales are climbing. Mortgage rates are near historic lows. The Associated Press spoke with Rohit Gupta, chief executive of Genworth Mortgage Insurance, about today's housing market.

  • Business
    Benzinga

    Can Nike Or Pepsi Beat Low Earnings Expectations?

    Upcoming earnings highlights include the latest results from two consumer goods giants. In another quiet week on the earnings front, reports from consumer goods giants Nike Inc (NYSE: NKE) and PepsiCo, Inc. (NYSE: PEP) will be highlights. Wall Street expectations for these results appear to be somewhat low, as both have shrinking earnings in their forecasts.

  • European firms offer Britain scant support in divorce talks
    Politics
    Reuters

    European firms offer Britain scant support in divorce talks

    More than 20 European business associations and companies interviewed by Reuters say they back their governments' position that Britain's banking sector can only enjoy EU market access post-Brexit if the country still follows the bloc's rules. Britain wants a trade deal that gives London's financial district, known as the City, access to EU clients while allowing the government to restrict migration from the bloc - something at odds with the basic rules of the European Union. Senior lawmakers in the British government have said they expect European business groups to support their position because they need access to the financial services the City provides.

  • Politics
    Bloomberg

    Sudan Should Remove Foreign Exchange Controls, World Bank Says

    Sudan should remove foreign exchange controls to unify the official and black-market rates for its currency in order to reverse the contraction of its economy, according to the World Bank. “It is essential that Sudan undertakes a combination of institutional, macroeconomic, and sectoral reforms to reach a more stable growth path,” the Washington-based bank said in a report published Sunday. Sudan lost 75 percent of its oil revenue when South Sudan became independent in 2011.

  • With Clinton and Trump in a Virtual Tie, Monday’s Debate Could Tip the Balance
    Politics
    The Fiscal Times

    With Clinton and Trump in a Virtual Tie, Monday’s Debate Could Tip the Balance

    With signs of an ever-tightening presidential contest, the political world was abuzz with speculation and advice for Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump Sunday on the eve of their crucial first nationally televised debate. Meanwhile, Trump, who has made it this far on the strength of vicious personal attacks on his opponents, harsh anti-immigrant rhetoric and scary, dystopian portrayals of the U.S. in sharp decline, must somehow show he has the vision and temperament to lead the country. Just 24 hours before Clinton and Trump face off on the campus of Hofstra University on Long Island in the first of three scheduled debates, the Sunday talk shows were dominated by tons of free strategic advice from political pols along those lines.