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  • Business
    The Drive

    Multimillionaire Gym Mogul Crashes Lamborghini Murciélago, Kills Uber Driver

    J. Gerald Smith, an 82-year old Uber driver, died this week after a yellow Lamborghini Murciélago struck his Buick Enclave, which was sitting at a stop sign. Roger Wittenberns, the 60-year old multimillionaire health club mogul, was behind the wheel of the Murciélago at the time of the wreck. Mr. Smith was a retired real estate agent.

  • T-Mobile outage? Customers wouldn't know the difference, says Verizon
    Technology
    CNET

    T-Mobile outage? Customers wouldn't know the difference, says Verizon

    Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives. When Samsung had a spot of bother with exploding phones, I don't remember Apple offering: "That's karma for copying." In the cell phone service provider world, however, things are a little more, well, Trumpian. Invective is tossed like monkeys throw, um, mud. So when reports emerged on Thursday that T-Mobile's wireless LTE data had gone down nationwide, Verizon offered pithy sympathy. Verizon's vice-president of communications, Jeffrey Nelson, emitted this on Twitter: "Nationwide outage: most@TMobile customers wouldn't know the difference given usual terrible performance." T-Mobile didn't immediately

  • Discount supermarkets are taking over the US
    Business
    Business Insider

    Discount supermarkets are taking over the US

    America's largest supermarkets are slashing prices amid ongoing food-price deflation and growing pressure from the rapid expansion of discount-grocery chains like Aldi. The price cuts are squeezing profits and dragging down company shares. Kroger, Whole Foods, Sprouts Farmers Market, and Dollar General have seen their stock prices drop a collective 13% in the last three months.

  • 5 Mistakes to Avoid During Open Enrollment
    Business
    Consumer Reports

    5 Mistakes to Avoid During Open Enrollment

    Whether you get your health insurance through your employer, Medicare, or one of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) exchanges, there’s a good chance you’re paying more than you need to. According to a study last year by the National Bureau of Economic Research, 63 percent of the 50,000 employees at a Fortune 100 company selected a health plan that was not the most cost-effective option. Why are so many people electing insurance plans that aren’t the best fit?

  • Business
    Benzinga

    Rite Aid, Walgreens' Merger Could Total 11% Return This Year

    In late 2015, Walgreens Boots Alliance Inc (NASDAQ: WBA) announced it was acquiring competitor Rite Aid Corporation (NYSE: RAD) for $9.00 share. The deal was expected to be completed in the second half of 2016, but there's still no word on the deal

  • News
    WSJ Live

    Timeline: Trump's Father Gave GOP Nominee Numerous Loans

    Donald Trump likes to tell the story of how he took a $1 million loan from his father, Fred Trump, and turned that into his business empire. But documents reviewed by the WSJ show there were frequent loans in the tens of millions. Photo: Getty

  • Flight attendants share the 16 most common misconceptions people have about their job
    Business
    Business Insider

    Flight attendants share the 16 most common misconceptions people have about their job

    When it comes a flight attendant's job, perception rarely matches reality. "People think there's glamour associated with this job, and there is to some extent when you're talking about, 'I just got back from Beijing, and I know the best shops in the Pearl Market,' or 'I spent Chinese New Year in Hong Kong,' or 'after spending the day at Ipanema Beach in Rio, we went to a fabulous churrascaria,'" Annette Long, a flight attendant with 13 years of experience, previously told Business Insider. "But the job itself is far from glamorous," she continues.

  • Got a Yahoo email account? Here are 3 things you need to do now
    Business
    MarketWatch

    Got a Yahoo email account? Here are 3 things you need to do now

    Yahoo Inc. said Thursday that account information for at least 500 million users was stolen by hackers during a 2014 breach. While thieves apparently were not able to acquire credit card information, bank account data or unencrypted passwords, Yahoo YHOO, -3.25%   users may have had their names, email addresses, telephone numbers, dates of birth, hashed passwords and, in some cases, security questions and answers, exposed. So if you have a Yahoo email account, what should you do? 1. Change your password. Even though Yahoo says it will notify potentially affected users, change your password anyway to make sure. Do it now. Yahoo is phasing out security questions and encouraging users to sign up

  • Bank of America has officially crowned one of the most senior women in finance
    BAC
    Business Insider

    Bank of America has officially crowned one of the most senior women in finance

    It's official: Sanaz Zaimi is now the sole head of fixed income, currency, and commodity — FICC — sales at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. Zaimi took that job on an interim basis in March when her cohead, Bryan Weadock, went on leave. On Friday, Tom Montag, chief operating officer at the bank, said Weadock would not be returning.

  • AP FACT CHECK: Trump off on how colleges use endowments
    News
    Associated Press

    AP FACT CHECK: Trump off on how colleges use endowments

    Donald Trump says colleges and universities should be using their endowments to make college more affordable but that too many are using "the money to pay their administrators or put donors' names on buildings or just store the money, keep it and invest it." But that's not exactly how endowments work. It's true that at the nation's wealthiest colleges, the amount of endowment money spent on student financial aid often takes up a relatively small share. Meanwhile, Harvard spent more than $1 billion that year on programs and facilities, and earned $4.5 billion in endowment revenue.

  • How to Calculate What You Need for Retirement
    Business
    Investopedia

    How to Calculate What You Need for Retirement

    To retire or not to retire? — That is the question. As you approach the age of 60, this is something you may ask yourself, as many people do. You've been working for much of your life and retiring early may sound especially appealing. You can live the lifestyle you want, avoid stress, and see your grandchildren more often. But if you retire early will you have enough capital to fund your golden years? As the normal retirement age gets closer, many people start wondering if they will have enough money to last through the course of their retirement. But can we accurately calculate such projections? How do you know much money is enough? What will your healthcare needs be, as this is often the biggest

  • Trim your wireless bill -- skip that phone upgrade
    Technology
    CNET

    Trim your wireless bill -- skip that phone upgrade

    It's hard to teach an old dog new tricks. Wireless subscribers have been conditioned to get a new phone every two years. That made sense back in the day, when wireless subsidies from mobile operators let you upgrade to the latest iPhone or Samsung Galaxy for only $200. Those days are over. Today consumers are expected to pay full price for their devices. The carriers have tried to make the hefty $650 price tag of high-end devices more palatable by offering payment plans. But wireless subscribers shouldn't confuse these plans with the old device subsidies. In this edition of Ask Maggie, I explain why, in this new era of wireless, you'll spend considerably more if you continue your device-upgrade-every-two-years

  • Cramer tries to understand what happened to Ulta Salon
    ULTA
    CNBC

    Cramer tries to understand what happened to Ulta Salon

    Until very recently, Ulta Salon, Cosmetics & Fragrance (NASDAQ: ULTA) was one of the hottest stocks out there. It suddenly fell off a cliff for no discernible reason, leaving Jim Cramer confused. The question now becomes whether Ulta is a broken stock or a broken company.

  • Let the Mind Games Begin: Clinton Gives Mark Cuban a Front Row Seat at the Debate
    Entertainment
    The Fiscal Times

    Let the Mind Games Begin: Clinton Gives Mark Cuban a Front Row Seat at the Debate

    It’s widely known that one of the strategies Hillary Clinton is likely to use in her debates against Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is to try to goad the notoriously thin-skinned billionaire into anger or overreaction in front of a national television audience. Turns out she may have a little help during the event at Hofstra University Monday night. The campaign has invited Mark Cuban, the billionaire owner of the Dallas Mavericks basketball team and, like Trump, a veteran of reality television, to take one of the front row seats at the event.

  • European firms offer Britain scant support in divorce talks
    Politics
    Reuters

    European firms offer Britain scant support in divorce talks

    More than 20 European business associations and companies interviewed by Reuters say they back their governments' position that Britain's banking sector can only enjoy EU market access post-Brexit if the country still follows the bloc's rules. Britain wants a trade deal that gives London's financial district, known as the City, access to EU clients while allowing the government to restrict migration from the bloc - something at odds with the basic rules of the European Union. Senior lawmakers in the British government have said they expect European business groups to support their position because they need access to the financial services the City provides.

  • Sports
    Yahoo Finance Video

    How one boutique bat maker is getting in the hands of Major League Baseball’s big hitters

    Major League Baseball players no longer have an easy decision when it comes to deciding which bat to choose.

  • Indonesia struggles to tap volcano power
    Science
    AFP

    Indonesia struggles to tap volcano power

    Columns of steam shoot from the ground at an Indonesian power plant sitting in the shadow of an active volcano, as energy is tapped from the red-hot underbelly of the archipelago. Pipes zig-zag up rugged mountainsides covered in tea plantations, carrying steam from the Earth's core to power enormous, electricity-generating turbines at the Wayang Windu facility on Java island. Indonesia, a seismically-active island chain studded with scores of volcanoes, holds an estimated 40 percent of the world's geothermal energy reserves, but has long lagged behind in its use of the renewable power source.

  • Ex-IMF boss Rato on trial over bankers' luxury sprees
    News
    AFP

    Ex-IMF boss Rato on trial over bankers' luxury sprees

    Former IMF chief Rodrigo Rato stands trial Monday accused of overseeing a "corrupt system" that helped him and other executives misuse funds on hotels, parties and luxury shopping when he was a Spanish bank boss. Uncovered in 2013 by a journalist who saw a hacked email alluding to "black credit cards," the case threatens to land the former economy minister and onetime star of the ruling conservative Popular Party (PP) in jail and with a hefty fine. It is also another thorn in the PP's side after repeated failed attempts to form a government following two inconclusive elections, due to a lack of support that is in large part due to corruption scandals sullying the party.

  • Market Update: Oil Crumbles After Saudis Pull The Plug
    Business
    Oilprice.com

    Market Update: Oil Crumbles After Saudis Pull The Plug

    Oil prices fell fast on Friday afternoon after Saudi Arabia claimed that "doesn't expect any decision" next week at OPEC’s unofficial meeting in Algiers. Oil prices jumped in the second half of this week on larger-than-expected drawdowns in U.S. crude oil and gasoline inventories. Crude oil inventories are now at their lowest level since the beginning of 2016 and more declines are expected.

  • Should I Pay Extra on My Student Loans?
    Business
    Credit.com

    Should I Pay Extra on My Student Loans?

    When you start repaying a student loan, it's a bit of a buzzkill to see a large chunk of money come out of your bank account. At least, that's how it works if you enter a standard repayment plan on a fixed-rate student loan, like most borrowers do. It's monotonous but predictable: Keep making that $350 payment on time, and after 10 years (or whatever the repayment term is), you'll be out of student loan debt.

  • Business
    Reuters

    Canada Unifor union sets tentative strike deadline for Fiat Chrysler

    Canada's Unifor union has set a tentative strike deadline of midnight Oct. 10 for talks with Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV (FCHA.MI), the labor group said on Saturday as it prepares to vote on a related deal with General Motors Co (GM.N). Unifor, which represents close to 10,000 Fiat Chrysler workers in Canada, said in a statement the strike deadline of 11:59 p.m. will stand if talks with Fiat Chrysler begin "immediately" after the union ratifies its contract with General Motors Co (GM.N) on Sunday.

  • Samsung says 90% of Note7 owners don’t want a refund despite fires
    Technology
    Dan Howley

    Samsung says 90% of Note7 owners don’t want a refund despite fires

    Samsung has had, what most would call, a bad month. It started with scattered reports of its new Galaxy Note7 catching fire for seemingly no reason and quickly escalated to a full-blown, worldwide safety recall.

  • Business
    Bloomberg

    No Respite for Battered Saudi Stocks as IPO Pipeline Shrinks

    Add this to the reasons why 2016 isn’t the year for Saudi stocks: the IPO pipeline is drying up. Two companies have announced plans for initial public offerings this year, down from six in 2015, putting the Saudi market on track for its slowest lineup since 2004. The dwindling IPO lineup is a complication for the kingdom as it plans to double the size of its $371 billion stock exchange and boost the number of traded companies by about 50 percent to 250 in seven years.

  • This famous Ford plant could be inspiring Elon Musk's ideas about how to re-imagine factories
    Business
    Business Insider

    This famous Ford plant could be inspiring Elon Musk's ideas about how to re-imagine factories

    Tesla recently opened a massive $5-billion lithium-ion battery factory in Nevada — the Gigafactory. The company formed a partnership with Panasonic to get the facility up and running, and CEO Elon Musk has also said that other sites, in other states, for additional Gigafactories, may be in the picture. In fact, the Nevada Gigafactory is called "Gigafactory 1." Future Gigafactories may even be located in other countries.

  • Politics
    Reuters

    Fed's internal split tied to dueling views on jobs outlook

    The split at the Federal Reserve over when to next raise interest rates appears to hinge largely on disagreements over the labor market outlook, comments from policymakers on Friday suggest. When the Fed earlier this week decided to stand pat on rates, Fed Chair Janet Yellen said she felt the labor market had more room to run before it could overheat. On Friday one of the dissenters, Boston Fed chief Eric Rosengren, explained that his vote turned on his view that sharply falling unemployment could create a spike in inflation and actually trigger a recession.