• Mark Cuban explains how to make a 16% guaranteed return
    MarketWatch

    Mark Cuban explains how to make a 16% guaranteed return

    As Mark Cuban, the “Shark Tank” star, billionaire entrepreneur, and NBA franchise owner explains, just pay off your debts. The personal finance site NerdWallet put our revolving credit card balance at $420.22 billion in late 2018. The revolving number is just the credit card debt we carry from month to month.

  • These 16 money wasters are why so many Americans can’t save for retirement
    MarketWatch

    These 16 money wasters are why so many Americans can’t save for retirement

    From the lofty perch of old age, and after a lifetime of thrift, I declare that I am qualified to comment on how not to waste money. We've all heard the reports: Most Americans live paycheck to paycheck, a large number can't come up with $400 for an emergency, and there's no money to save for retirement and other goals. Most of that data comes from surveys where people are, in effect, saying they don't have enough income.

  • Here’s the game plan for U.S. stock investors if China retaliates against Trump
    MarketWatch

    Here’s the game plan for U.S. stock investors if China retaliates against Trump

    In the past, China has shown extraordinary restraint in response to U.S. tariffs and President Trump's critical tweets. Let us discuss your game plan if China retaliates, starting with the help of two charts. Please click here for an annotated chart S&P 500 ETF (SPY) Even though the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) is the most popular index, for analysis purposes, investors ought to focus on S&P 500 because the most money is tied to the S&P 500 Index (SPX) of the largest U.S. companies.

  • Argentina Default Risk Rising, Not Inevitable: UBS's Baweja
    Bloomberg

    Argentina Default Risk Rising, Not Inevitable: UBS's Baweja

    Bhanu Baweja, deputy head of global macro strategy at UBS, discusses the possibility of a debt default by Argentina on "Bloomberg Markets: European Close."

  • Senior rip-offs are soaring—and you won’t believe who the crooks are
    MarketWatch

    Senior rip-offs are soaring—and you won’t believe who the crooks are

    For financial scammers, that means 10,000 potential new victims every 24 hours. While anyone, anywhere, at anytime can be a victim of a financial scam—and below are some of the most common ones—seniors are particularly at risk. “Older Americans are more vulnerable for many reasons,” says Joe Snyder of the National Adult Protective Services Association (NAPSA), a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit that works with the financial industry, seniors groups and others to reduce rip-offs.

  • Does the ‘4% rule’ for retirement work if you retire early?
    MarketWatch

    Does the ‘4% rule’ for retirement work if you retire early?

    If you take a pessimist's view, 4% — the amount retirement experts typically suggest retirees withdraw each year from their retirement funds — may not last, the original poster wrote. If we look structurally at the U.S. economy, it's started to look more and more European,” they wrote. The workforce is “trending older and more educated,” family size continues to decrease, long-term prime-age workforce participation is dipping, they wrote.

  • I built a nest egg of $1 million and I’m only 46 — so why do I still spend my waking hours worrying?
    MarketWatch

    I built a nest egg of $1 million and I’m only 46 — so why do I still spend my waking hours worrying?

    We have over $1 million in investments for ourselves, an additional $50,000 in investments for our two girls to be used for college. We have made investing mistakes, but we have learned from them. All told, we currently have over $1 million in investments for ourselves, an additional $50,000 in investments (529s and a Scottrade custodial account) for our two girls to be used for college, with our only debt being the final few years of our mortgage.

  • 10 Best Stocks to Buy and Hold Forever
    InvestorPlace

    10 Best Stocks to Buy and Hold Forever

    In a market environment that overwhelmingly encourages constant activity by investors who seemingly want to double their money every week, a discussion of stocks to buy and hold forever seems comically out of place. Conversely, the fact that Warren Buffett's favorite holding period is “forever” and how he's got a track record most investors would envy is just as telling. With that as the backdrop, here's a rundown of 10 stocks to buy and hold forever … or at least until something significant changes with your life plans or the companies themselves.

  • Barrons.com

    Some Stocks Are About to Go Ex-Dividend. Here Are Some to Consider Buying.

    Whether the market hits another rough patch next week, there's one thing that is certain: Investors who buy a stock just before it goes ex-dividend are entitled to the next payout. Bespoke Investment Group compiled a list of 19 stocks in the S&P 1500 that are going ex-dividend on Monday. Buying shares before the market close on Friday entitles the purchaser to the next dividend payment.

  • General Electric’s (GE) Biggest Bull Is Unfazed by Harry Markopolos’ Bearish Report
    TipRanks

    General Electric’s (GE) Biggest Bull Is Unfazed by Harry Markopolos’ Bearish Report

    A bad month got worse for General Electric (GE) yesterday when a whistleblower report was released by a forensic accountant alleging that accounting fraud will cause GE to go bankrupt. William Blair analyst Nicholas Heymann remains unfazed by the bearish report, supporting Culp's huge vote of confidence, as he reiterates an Outperform rating on GE stock. Although Heymann does not have a price target on the stock, his calculations imply an intrinsic value between $14 and $16 per share.

  • 3 Warning Signals a Stock Market Crash Is Coming
    InvestorPlace

    3 Warning Signals a Stock Market Crash Is Coming

    Cheap Dividend Stocks to Load Up On So here are three warning signals I'm seeing that could cause problems for the market — and one step you can take today to make sure you're prepared for the worst… Market Crash Warning Signal No. Deep in Debt Let's go back to 2007 … right before the last time the market crashed. The economy had been humming along at a growth rate of 2% to 3% for the previous five years, which caused the S&P 500's earnings to double from the recessionary lows of 2002.

  • Barrons.com

    Wall Street Has Abandoned Oil and Gas Stocks. You Shouldn’t.

    Given long-term demand uncertainties facing the industry, energy companies of all sizes should be paying out dividends that are at least as good as the nearly 2% yield on the S&P 500, he says. Still, it is hard to find big fans of energy stocks, even among investors focused on the sector. That's understandable, given that energy is by far the worst-performing group in the S&P 500 over the past decade, with an annualized return of 4.4%, against 14% for the index.

  • Barrons.com

    GE’s Insurance Reserves Were at the Heart of a Fraud Claim. Here’s What Goldman Sachs Has to Say.

    Two Wall Street analysts at (GS) collaborated on a (GE) research report and reached a meaningful conclusion. Analyst Joe Ritchie, who covers industrial stocks, and analyst Alex Scott, who covers the North American life insurance industry, published a report comparing General Electric (ticker: GE) insurance reserves to other insurers. Goldman's report followed the negative report from forensic accountant Harry Markopolos, which challenged many GE long-term care insurance accounting assumptions, among other issues.

  • The No. 1 mistake rookie investors make — and how to avoid it
    MarketWatch

    The No. 1 mistake rookie investors make — and how to avoid it

    An amateur investor might buy stocks in lumber, mining, oil and banks, and believe they are diversifying because they're investing in different companies and sectors,” study co-author David Hardisty, an assistant professor at Sauder, said in a statement. But because all of those equities tend to move in unison, it can be quite risky, because all the assets can potentially plunge at the same time. The authors predict that some of these inexperienced investors would be better off picking stocks at random.

  • Benzinga

    SmileDirectClub Files For $100M IPO

    SmileDirectClub has filed for an initial public offering of up to $100 million. The stock will list on the Nasdaq exchange under the ticker "SDC." The teledentistry company provides invisible teeth-straightening devices.

  • IQIYI Calls Active Despite Analyst Warning Before Earnings
    Schaeffer's Investment Research

    IQIYI Calls Active Despite Analyst Warning Before Earnings

    IQIYI Inc (NASDAQ:IQ) -- often called the Chinese Netflix -- will report earnings after the close on Monday, Aug. 19. Ahead of the event, J.P. Morgan Securities launched coverage of the stock with an "underweight" rating and $14 price target, representing a record low for IQ shares and an 18% discount to their current price. Nevertheless, IQ stock is up 1% at $17.15 today, as Chinese tech names move higher on the country's stimulus plans.

  • Barrons.com

    Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Is a ‘Misunderstood’ Cash Machine. So Bill Ackman Bought Its Stock

    Pershing Square Holdings' Bill Ackman is usually considered an activist investor but there doesn't seem to be much that's “active” about his new stake in (BRKA) Berkshire Hathaway may be run by the world's most famous investor, but the company itself is “misunderstood,” Ackman said in a letter to (PSH) investors released late on Thursday explaining why his firm bought more than 3.5 million shares in the second quarter, valued at $701 million today. Berkshire Hathaway (BRK.B) stock rose 0.5% on Friday morning to $199.35, while the S&P 500 has gained 0.8% to 2,870.72, and the Dow Jones Industrial Average has advanced 135.27 points, or 0.5%, to 25,714.66.

  • GIS Clears Buy Point
    Investor's Business Daily Video

    GIS Clears Buy Point

    The cereal maker poked above a 54.84 buy point. A Composite Rating of 86 is helped by high return on equity and accelerating sales growth in recent quarters. It also offers an annualized dividend yield of 3.6%.STOCK MARKET TODAY is sponsored by Interactive Brokers.

  • Long-Term Care Costs Might Kill General Electric Stock
    InvestorPlace

    Long-Term Care Costs Might Kill General Electric Stock

    My long-time friend Martin Bayne had Parkinson's disease for decades, forcing him into nursing care in his middle-age years. What Bernie Madoff whistleblower Harry Markopolos is calling a “fraud” by General Electric (NYSE:GE) of just over $38 billion, enough to sink the company, is mostly the natural consequence of forcing an unlimited draw on a limited pool of funds.

  • Price Targets Raised On Alibaba Stock After Quarterly Earnings Blowout
    Investor's Business Daily

    Price Targets Raised On Alibaba Stock After Quarterly Earnings Blowout

    Alibaba stock jumped Friday as the China e-commerce giant received several price-target hikes following the Alibaba earnings report that smashed estimates. China's largest technology company easily beat quarterly estimates despite a trade war and as China's economic growth, including retail sales, has slowed sharply over the past year. Alibaba reported results Thursday.

  • MarketWatch

    Trump held call with big bank CEOs during Wednesday market plunge: report

    President Donald Trump held a conference call Wednesday with top executives of three major Wall Street banks as the stock market plunged and the bond market sent a recession signal, Bloomberg reported Friday. Trump held the call with JPMorgan Chase & Co.'s (jpm) Jamie Dimon, Bank of America Corp.'s (bac) Brian Moynihan, and Citigroup Inc.'s (c) Michael Corbat, the report said. Stocks tumbled Wednesday, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average (djia) falling 800 points, or 3.1%, to log its biggest one-day percentage drop of the year, while the S&P 500 (spx) dropped 2.9%, as the yield on the 10-year Treasury yield briefly dipped below the 2-year note yield, a phenomenon seen as a potential warnin...

  • The retirement crisis is bad for everyone — especially these people
    MarketWatch

    The retirement crisis is bad for everyone — especially these people

    The country is facing a retirement crisis, but some Americans are worse off than others. Workers in the top 20% of earnings distributions have half of all retirement wealth in both 1992 and 2010, compared with the bottom group, which saw its share fall from 3% to 1% between those years, a recent analysis at The New School's Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA) found. The share of workers in the bottom fifth of the earnings distribution with no retirement savings jumped from 45% to 51% in those 18 years.

  • TheStreet.com

    Hong Kong Protesters Try to Start a Run on the Banks and the Currency

    Beijing kicked this off by getting its airline regulator to put pressure on Hong Kong's leading airline, Cathay Pacific . There's a limit of HK$20,000 (US$2,550) that you can withdraw per day at the ATM in Hong Kong, though I imagine the bank has to give you what you've got there if you go in and demand it. Some protesters have also been converting Hong Kong dollars to U.S. dollars, which pressures the link between the two currencies, U.S.$1 being worth always around HK$7.78, thanks to the central bank's maneuvering.

  • Benzinga

    Barron's Picks And Pans: American Eagle Outfitters, Chevron, Grocery Outlet And More

    The cover story in this weekend's Barron's offers stock picks for an energy sector rebound. Other featured articles discuss how the trade war is hitting tech's bottom line and why banks are not an alternative to utilities. Also, the prospects for an apparel retailer, a discount grocer, a genetic testing company and more.

  • The new math of saving for retirement may boil down to this one, absurdly simple rule
    MarketWatch

    The new math of saving for retirement may boil down to this one, absurdly simple rule

    There's research that can help — from institutions that don't have a conflict of interest because they don't invest or give advice. My favorite is the Employee Benefits Research Institute in Washington, D.C. EBRI, as it's called, gathered anonymous information on tens of millions of people and how they actually save. It won't tell people what to do, but from its research there's a pretty useful rule of thumb for young people: Count on your fingers and … Save 10% — now Between you and your employer, set aside at least 10% of your paycheck.