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Why You Should Pay Attention to the Way Management Talks

·2 min read
Why You Should Pay Attention to the Way Management Talks

Its start is still a couple of weeks away— JPMorgan Chase (ticker: JPM) gets things going when it reports on Oct. 13—and analysts are already tweaking their numbers to take into account potential supply-chain disruptions, higher labor costs, and strong demand. Investors, however, should also pay attention to the type of language that management uses on earnings calls, according to research from Nomura quantitative strategist Joseph Mezrich, who looked at how stocks performed based on whether the language used was simple or complicated. The difference in the language used on earnings calls, however, is much wider, with the most complicated discussions at a college junior level, and the simplest at a high school junior level.