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At career’s end, maybe we should embrace anti-retirement

·5 min read
At career’s end, maybe we should embrace anti-retirement

Retirement is commonly known as the end of your career and the beginning of a new life of leisure. According to the Stanford University Center for Longevity, in less than a century, average life expectancy in the developed world has increased by nearly 30 years, with many of those years coming in what we traditionally thought of as retirement. It means that retirement planning, which has normally been focused on making sure that you don’t exhaust your financial resources, needs to be replaced with longevity planning, so you can design a plan to use all of this newfound extra time.