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D.C.-area contractors could see hypersonic missile demand ramp up after alleged Chinese test

·4 min read
D.C.-area contractors could see hypersonic missile demand ramp up after alleged Chinese test
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Recently released news that China allegedly conducted a successful test of a nuclear-capable hypersonic missile in August ramped up attention on the competition between the U.S., Russia and China to develop the next-generation weapons — and likely caught the eye of Greater Washington's federal contractors that contribute to U.S. hypersonic weapon and missile defense programs. A report Saturday from The Financial Times alleged that China tested a hypersonic glide vehicle, which was launched into low-Earth orbit via a rocket before it detached and cruised within 24 miles of its intended target. According to the report, the launch demonstrates a new level of sophistication in China’s development of the weapons — dubbed hypersonics because they can fly in excess of 3,800 miles per hour, or five times the speed of sound — “that caught U.S. intelligence by surprise.”