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Not all businesses are raving about Colorado's proposed sports-betting bill

Ed Sealover
Not all businesses are raving about Colorado's proposed sports-betting bill

A bill to allow legalized sports gambling to be run through licensed casinos may be getting bipartisan support in the Colorado Legislature, but like many gaming issues before it, it is splitting established casinos from the state’s only horse track and related off-track betting locations that want to spread the state’s legalized gambling revenue among a much bigger pool of businesses. House Bill 1327 — sponsored by House Majority Leader Alec Garnett, D-Denver, and Minority Leader Patrick Neville, R-Castle Rock — would decriminalize sports betting beginning in May 2020 and allow people to place bets through licensed outlets, which must be existing owners of casinos in Black Hawk, Central City or Cripple Creek. This would only happen if statewide voters approve the practice in an election in November that also would establish a 10 percent tax on the net proceeds from sports gambling and fund implementation of the Colorado Water Plan, as well as a smattering of other programs.