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What $1,000 in Stocks Invested 10 Years Ago Would Be Worth Today

Joel Anderson

This article originally appeared on GOBankingRates.com: What $1,000 in Stocks Invested 10 Years Ago Would Be Worth Today

Over the past 10 years, the stock market experienced one of its most severe declines in history, followed by a robust rally that is still ongoing. During this time, some stocks have thrived while others have struggled.

GOBankingRates researched historical prices to see what $1,000 invested in your favorite companies in 2008 would be worth 10 years later, as well as what the compound annual growth rate is to give you a sense of what the yearly return for each has been over time.

Keep reading to learn about the fastest growing stocks since 2000, and see which companies have produced impressive growth rates during the past decade.

SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY): $1,923.47

Share Price May 1, 2008: $138.39
Share Price May 1, 2018: $266.24
Compound annual growth rate: 6.76 percent

Perhaps the easiest route to investing in stocks is to simply invest in ETFs that track major indices. If you can’t beat the market, and almost everyone can’t, why not join it?

In this case, the S&P 500 ETF from SPDR is among the most popular options for ETFs that track the S&P 500, which is generally considered the benchmark by which the performance of most stocks are judged.

So, the roughly $2,000 that your $1,000 investment 10 years ago would be worth now is one of the best ways to gauge just how well some of these companies have performed.

Apple (AAPL): $7,407.06

Share price May 1, 2008: $24.99
Share price May 1, 2018: $185.16
Compound annual growth rate: 22.17 percent

Apple is one of the most iconic and well-known brands in the world, thanks in part to a few key reinventions and rebranding strategies. A decade ago, Apple was a tech firm less than one year into its release of the iPhone. Today, it’s a consumer goods giant that has ridden the smartphone revolution to its status as the most valuable company in the world, closing in on a valuation of $1 trillion.

Netflix (NFLX): $74,394.38

Share price May 1, 2008: $4.52
Share price May 1, 2018: $326.26
Compound annual growth rate: 53.87 percent

Netflix shares have been prone to large gains and losses as it has grown into a dominant media company. But like Apple, Netflix wasn’t exactly the company it is today 10 years ago. In May of 2008, Netflix was primarily a mail-order DVD rental company that had just rolled out a streaming service that was capped at 10 hours of free viewing a month for the base membership.

If you predicted that streaming was the wave of the future — like CEO Reed Hastings did — every $1,000 you invested in Netflix would be worth almost $75,000 today.

Alphabet (GOOGL): $3,626.72

Share price May 1, 2008: $292.13
Share price May 1, 2018: $1,059.46
Compound annual growth rate: 13.75 percent

Alphabet is the holding company for technology giant Google. Over the years, the company has expanded into many different businesses. These range from office productivity products to phones, virtual assistants and entertainment services.

Walt Disney Co. (DIS): $3,158.94

Share price May 1, 2008: $32.45
Share price May 1, 2018: $102.48
Compound annual growth rate: 12.19 percent

With its TV shows, networks, movies and theme parks, Disney has evolved into a massive media conglomerate. Its share price stagnated in 2016 and 2017, in part due to poor subscriber numbers at subsidiary ESPN. However, plans to launch its own streaming service might help Disney stock recapture its mojo.

Coca-Cola Company (KO): $1,438.09

Share price May 1, 2008: $29.31
Share price May 1, 2018: $42.14
Compound annual growth rate: 3.70 percent

Coke is an iconic brand and one of Warren Buffett’s favorite investments. However, the declining popularity of sugary soda drinks might be eating into the company’s profitability in the long run.

Walmart (WMT): $1,468.90

Share price May 1, 2008: $58.20
Share price May 1, 2018: $85.47
Compound annual growth rate: 3.92 percent

Walmart is the world’s biggest retailer but it suffered a scare from competitors like Amazon in 2015, which, along with internal factors, correlated with a decline in stock value. That put a real damper on its returns for this time period, making this the first stock listed here that underperformed the S&P 500 over the last decade. So, one of the things to avoid at Walmart might actually be its stock.

Transocean Ltd. (RIG): $83.36

Share Price May 1, 2008: $146.95
Share Price May 1, 2018: $12.25
Compound annual growth rate: -22.00 percent

It turns out being associated with one of the most catastrophic oil spills in history can have a negative effect on your shares. Transocean stock was riding high through the first half of 2008, but it went into a free fall when markets crashed later that year. The hits kept coming when, in 2010, the Deepwater Horizon accident occurred. If you failed to pull your $1,000 out of Transocean stock at any point in the last decade, you would be left with less than $100 today.

Trex Company, Inc. (TREX): $23,582.58

Share Price May 1, 2008: $4.50
Share Price May 1, 2018: $106.14
Compound annual growth rate: 37.17 percent

Trex Company makes wood/plastic composites used in making outdoor decks — which, apparently, is a pretty great business to be in as the company has been growing at over 35 percent a year in the last decade. Although growth has been mostly consistent, 2017 was the biggest year for Trex stock: It gained roughly 70 percent last year.

Microsoft (MSFT): $3,376.59

Share price May 1, 2008: $28.50
Share price May 1, 2018: $96.22
Compound annual growth rate: 12.94 percent

Microsoft’s stock has performed well over the past few years, but it pales in contrast to its performance during the 1990s, when it helped create a number of “Microsoft millionaires.” These days, it’s still considered one of the safest stocks to invest in — especially for first-time investors.

Nike (NKE): $4,152.34

Share price May 1, 2008: $16.70
Share price May 1, 2018: $69.34
Compound annual growth rate: 15.30 percent

Nike continues to be an innovator and leader in the sports apparel and equipment industry. By sponsoring a number of high-profile athletes and teams, the Nike symbol is one of the most recognizable around. However, in 2016 the stock hit some headwinds and took a hard tumble that it didn’t fully recover from until the end of 2017.

General Electric (GE): $428.76

Share price May 1, 2008: $32.80
Share price May 1, 2018: $14.07
Compound annual growth rate: -8.12 percent

Like much of the overall market, General Electric’s stock plummeted during the 2008-2009 financial crisis. For GE, the culprit was mainly its financial division, GE Capital. The stock recovered nicely coming out of that period, but major missteps in 2014 and 2017 have turned it into a long-term underperformer. In fact, General Electric stock was even more efficient at losing you money over the last ten years than the S&P 500 was at making it.

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Amazon (AMZN): $20,406.42

Share price May 1, 2008: $78.40
Share price May 1, 2018: $1,600.14
Compound annual growth rate: 35.20 percent

A $1,000 investment in Amazon would have provided a substantial return for the long-term investor. A leader in e-commerce, Amazon consistently adds new products and services for consumer and business customers. This might be the reason many experts say this is one stock you’ll want to hold onto for a very long time.

Pfizer (PFE): $1,732.59

Share price May 1, 2008: $20.17
Share price May 1, 2018: $34.93
Compound annual growth rate: 5.65 percent

Thinking about investing in the healthcare sector? Pfizer is a good stock for beginners to try. The company is a major biopharmaceutical company whose stock provides consistent growth. On the downside, it has lagged the performance of both its industry group and the S&P 500 index over multi-year periods.

McDonald’s (MCD): $2,771.11

Share price May 1, 2008: $59.54
Share price May 1, 2018: $165.00
Compound annual growth rate: 10.73 percent

McDonald’s is in an industry where it must regularly reinvent itself. Faced with changing consumer trends and an onslaught of competitors, the company has responded by retooling its menu, adding all-day breakfast and changing to fresh beef in some of its burgers. Investors are probably hoping it works; McDonald’s stock has beaten the S&P 500 consistently since 2005.

Starbucks (SBUX): $7,197.57

Share price May 1, 2008: $7.98
Share price May 1, 2018: $57.45
Compound annual growth rate: 21.82 percent

Starbucks has taken the way we drink coffee and turned it into a lifestyle, both domestically and internationally. After being hit hard during the financial crisis, the stock rebounded nicely the following years. Starbucks ran into trouble recently, though, after two African-American men were arrested at a Philadelphia location, prompting a wave of negative publicity.

Find Out: How to Cut Your Annual Starbucks Bill Without Giving Up Your Coffee

Chesapeake Energy Corporation (CHK): $62.70

Share Price May 1, 2008: $49.22
Share Price May 1, 2018: $3.13
Compound annual growth rate: -24.19 percent

Between the financial crisis and then the massive drop in oil prices in late 2014, it really hasn’t been a good decade for investors in Oklahoma City-based oil and gas producer Chesapeake Energy Corporation. Chesapeake Energy stock used to trade for nearly $50 a share. Today, you can get a single share for just over $3, leaving you with a paltry $62.70 from a $1,000 investment in May of 2008.

FedEx (FDX): $2,542.33

Share price May 1, 2008: $95.59
Share price May 1, 2018: $243.12
Compound annual growth rate: 9.78 percent

FedEx and other shipping competitors have benefited from the boom in e-commerce retailers such as Amazon, but the company has been hot since well before the rise of Amazon and others. FedEx stock has outperformed the S&P 500 since the start of 2001.

Learn: How to Know When to Sell Stocks

Oracle (ORCL): $2,193.15

Share Price May 1, 2008: $21.01
Share Price May 1, 2018: $46.07
Compound annual growth rate: 8.17 percent

Oracle’s returns aren’t terribly impressive when weighed against the S&P 500, but they are still ahead of the index. What’s more, it hit a major milestone in late June of last year when it finally surpassed its all-time high from 2000 prior to a steep sell-off in the midst of the tech bubble bursting, having traded below that level for over 15 years.

The Boeing Company (BA): $4,010.52

Share Price May 1, 2008: $84.86
Share Price May 1, 2018: $340.43
Compound annual growth rate: 14.90 percent

Boeing stock has been one of the stronger performers in the Dow Jones for some time, but much of those gains have been since the start of 2017. The stock has almost doubled since the start of last year.

The Mosaic Company (MOS): $228.61

Share Price May 1, 2008: $120.56
Share Price May 1, 2018: $27.56
Compound annual growth rate: -13.72 percent

The Mosaic Company is a basic materials company that produces concentrated phosphate and potash fertilizers. Of course, in the last decade, Mosaic Company stock has just been producing a lot of disappointed investors as it dropped to under a fifth of its May 2008 value. Maybe they could take pictures of everyone who lost money and piece them together into one big collage of sorts.

Activision Blizzard, Inc. (ATVI): $5,194.05

Share Price May 1, 2008: $13.55
Share Price May 1, 2018: $70.37
Compound annual growth rate: 17.91 percent

From the start of 2010 to the start of 2013, Activision Blizzard stock held painfully steady. The stock opened 2010 at $11.23 a pop and ended 2013 at $18.29 a share. That makes the massive gain over the 10-year period all the more impressive, considering it essentially broke even on the first half of that period. Since the start of 2013, the stock is up a whopping 530 percent.

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Estee Lauder Companies, Inc. (EL): $5,864.41

Share Price May 1, 2008: $22.81
Share Price May 1, 2018: $133.79
Compound annual growth rate: 19.35 percent

There’s no need to slap makeup on results like these, Estee Lauder’s nearly 20 percent annual return over the last decade might have investors blushing at how well they’ve done. The company grew at a rapid rate after the 2008 crash, had one hiccup in 2016, only to roar back in 2017, nearly doubling its value from the start of 2017 to March 2018.

Salesforce.com, Inc. (CRM): $7,547.69

Share Price May 1, 2008: $16.82
Share Price May 1, 2018: $126.97
Compound annual growth rate: 22.40 percent

Salesforce.com has been extremely consistent with its impressive growth over the last decade. Aside from losses in 2008, 2011 and 2016, Salesforce stock made gains in every other full year since it went public in 2004.

EnviroStar, Inc. (EVI): $37,441.96

Share Price May 1, 2008: $1.00
Share Price May 1, 2018: $37.45
Compound annual growth rate: 43.66 percent

EnviroStar is the smallest company on this list, with a total valuation of under half a billion dollars. Of course, its admirable growth represents the sort of returns even cryptocurrency investors dream of. If you had the foresight to sink $1,000 into this Miami-based maker of dry-cleaning equipment — which would have gotten you exactly 1,000 shares — your investment would have ballooned to almost $40,000 by today.

Click through to read more about 30 affordable stocks you can buy on a budget.

John Csiszar contributed to the reporting for this article.

Returns data does not include the value of dividends issued during the indicated time frame.