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UPDATE 1-Brazil's cenbank to tweak rate-cut guidance 'at some point,' director says

(Adds further comments in paragraphs 3-9)

SAO PAULO, March 1 (Reuters) - Brazil's central bank monetary policy director said on Friday that "at some point" policymakers will need to remove the use of the plural in their monetary easing guidance, which has been flagging 50 basis point cuts for the upcoming "meetings".

Speaking at an event hosted by local media outlet Money Report, Gabriel Galipolo said that when that happens, there may be a "cost" associated with the change.

If the central bank had removed the plural from its guidance earlier, the same action could have been interpreted in opposite directions - indicating either an acceleration or deceleration of the easing pace, he added.

The central bank kicked off its easing cycle in August with a 50 basis-point cut after nearly a year of unchanged rates at a six-year high of 13.75%, aimed at combating inflation.

Since then, it has consistently signaled the maintenance of the same easing pace for the meetings ahead.

Brazil's benchmark interest rate now stands at 11.25%.

Galipolo also said that the central bank does not "see much value in anticipating the terminal interest rate now."

He emphasized that policymakers believe the current pace of cuts allows time to assess the economy's reaction speed in a context where other variables are also on the radar, such as the onset of the U.S. monetary easing cycle.

But the primary focus for the bank's monetary policy remains domestic inflation, stressed Galipolo. (Reporting by Marcela Ayres; editing by Gabriel Araujo)

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