U.S. markets open in 1 hour 14 minutes
  • S&P Futures

    4,080.75
    -1.00 (-0.02%)
     
  • Dow Futures

    34,396.00
    -33.00 (-0.10%)
     
  • Nasdaq Futures

    12,054.50
    -8.25 (-0.07%)
     
  • Russell 2000 Futures

    1,883.50
    -0.20 (-0.01%)
     
  • Crude Oil

    81.92
    +0.70 (+0.86%)
     
  • Gold

    1,813.50
    -1.70 (-0.09%)
     
  • Silver

    22.97
    +0.13 (+0.56%)
     
  • EUR/USD

    1.0540
    +0.0011 (+0.11%)
     
  • 10-Yr Bond

    3.5290
    0.0000 (0.00%)
     
  • Vix

    20.29
    -0.29 (-1.41%)
     
  • GBP/USD

    1.2276
    +0.0020 (+0.16%)
     
  • USD/JPY

    134.1500
    -1.1560 (-0.85%)
     
  • BTC-USD

    17,072.37
    -67.23 (-0.39%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    405.33
    -0.82 (-0.20%)
     
  • FTSE 100

    7,545.25
    -13.24 (-0.18%)
     
  • Nikkei 225

    27,777.90
    -448.18 (-1.59%)
     

UPDATE 1-Brazil's gross debt falls in July to lowest level since the pandemic beginning

(Adds details, context)

BRASILIA, Aug 31 (Reuters) - Brazil's government debt fell to its lowest level since the start of the coronavirus pandemic amid favorable fiscal data, central bank data showed on Wednesday.

The country's debt as a share of gross domestic product dropped to 77.6% in July, from 78% in June, the lowest figure since March 2020, when it reached 77.03%.

At the peak of the spending spree to fight the pandemic, the indicator reached 89% of GDP.

According to the central bank, the Brazilian public sector recorded a primary surplus of 20.44 billion reais ($3.95 billion) in July, reversing a 10.283 billion reais deficit from the same month last year.

The central government surplus reached 19.961 billion reais in July, while states and municipalities recorded a 1.76 billion reais surplus.

State-owned companies, on the other hand, had a primary deficit of 1.28 billion reais.

Fiscal data has been helped by booming tax revenue, on the back of a surge on commodities prices, while central government expenditure has been constrained by the constitutional spending cap rule.

($1 = 5.1697 reais) (Reporting by Marcela Ayres; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama)