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10 senators who voted against USMCA

Evie Fordham

The Senate approved the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, also known as "new NAFTA," 89-10 on Thursday, giving the Trump administration a big win as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says her fellow Democrats perfected the deal.

Here are the eight Democrats, one Republican and one independent who voted against the USMCA:

  • Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y.

  • Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y.

  • Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J.

  • Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif.

  • Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass.

  • Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I.

  • Sen. Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii 

  • Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa.

  • Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.

Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Okla., who has supported USMCA in the past, did not vote because he was in Oklahoma to be with a family member with a medical issue, his office said.

Toomey, a free-trade advocate, has long been critical of USMCA.

"I'm convinced that USMCA is the first trade agreement the U.S. has ever entered into ... in which the intent was to diminish trade," Toomey said on the Brookings Institution's "Dollar & Sense" podcast.

READ THE FULL USMCA TRADE DEAL

"We have a trade deficit with Mexico," Toomey said. "Every credible and reputable economist I know thinks that doesn't matter a bit in terms of measuring economic health. But that's not the view of the administration. I believe that they set out to renegotiate NAFTA for the purpose of diminishing trade with Mexico."

USMCA passed the House of Representatives in December after both the Trump administration and House Democrats took credit for the $1.2 trillion deal they say will be better for Americans than NAFTA, which President Trump has referred to in the past as "NAFTA the disaster."

WILBUR ROSS: USMCA, US-CHINA PHASE ONE DEAL WILL EQUATE TO $2T IN TRADE

Trade negotiators from the U.S., Mexico and Canada finalized USMCA in December after coming to an agreement on how enforcement of its provisions would work.

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The USMCA, which overhauls the Clinton-era NAFTA, requires 75 percent of automobile components be manufactured in the U.S., Canada and Mexico in order to avoid tariffs, and that 40 to 45 percent of automobile parts be made by workers who earn at least $16 an hour by 2023.

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The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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