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These Are 10 of the Slowest Selling New Cars on the Market

skynesher / Getty Images
skynesher / Getty Images

Cars don’t make money sitting on the lot, which is why car dealers will often offer price reductions and other incentives to rid themselves of slow-selling cars and clear up room for more (and faster selling) inventory. So far in 2024, cars made by Stellantis have had the most trouble selling, according to an analysis from CarEdge. That means you could pick up deals on some of its vehicles — though they won’t necessarily come cheap.

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One of the most important metrics for car dealers is market day supply, which CarEdge describes as the “number of days it would take to sell all of a particular model of car based on the current sales rate, assuming no additional inventory is added.” A high MDS suggests an oversupply, which could give buyers leverage for negotiation. In contrast, a low MDS is usually a sign of a seller’s market, making negotiations tougher.

Using its own data, CarEdge recently identified which new cars have the most and least inventory available in February and found some “shocking” results. Inventory ranges from only two weeks of supply to a supply of nearly two years, with several models having more than one year of supply on dealer lots.

Here’s a look at the 10 slowest-selling models right now, according to CarEdge. Just be warned — although you might be able to negotiate some deals on these cars, their average transaction price is still a steep $70,277. That’s much higher than the ATP for all new vehicles in January 2024, which was $47,401, according to the latest report from Cox Automotive’s Kelley Blue Book. Only three of the 10 cars listed below have an ATP below the January average.

Vehicle

Average Selling Price

Market Day Supply

Dodge Hornet

$41,114

480

Dodge Charger

$44,375

477

Ford Mustang Mach-E

$55,094

362

Dodge Challenger

$52,553

360

Chrysler 300

$43,214

346

Ram 3500

$79,378

342

Audi e-tron GT

$117,057

327

Ram 2500

$70,129

318

Jaguar F-Type

$100,134

315

Maserati Levante

$99,721

301

More From GOBankingRates

This article originally appeared on GOBankingRates.com: These Are 10 of the Slowest Selling New Cars on the Market

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