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11 Ways to Save If Your Heating & Cooling Bills Are Boiling Over

Brian Acton
When the weather gets extreme, it can put a real dent in your finances. Here's how to keep temperatures in your house from frying (or freezing) your budget.

It's one of the facts of modern life: Keeping your home the right temperature can get expensive, whether you're in a studio apartment or a spacious house, you may be paying more than you have to in order to heat your home. Fear not! There are several ways you can cut back on how much you're spending on temperature control in your home. Here are 11 ways to lower your heating or cooling bill. (And if you're looking for more ways to save on your monthly home expenses, you can check out these seven easy ways to save on your cable bill.)

1. Seal Your Windows

Windows that are improperly sealed can leak air, losing energy and causing your heating system or air conditioner to work harder.

"Gaps around the window frame allow air to leak, so caulk any gaps in the seals to save on your heating bill," said Richard Ciresi, owner of Louisville Aire Serv, a heat and air conditioning company.

2. Upgrade Your Windows

You can also upgrade your windows to more energy-efficient models.

"New windows are a big investment, but not one without substantial reward," said Larry Patterson, a Glass Doctor franchisee. "Replacing your old windows with double or triple-pane energy efficient glass can save you up to 30% on your energy bills."

3. Get a Programmable Thermostat

Programmable thermostats can cut energy costs by automatically adjusting the temperature while you're away, reducing the energy wasted on heating or cooling an empty home.

"Investing in a programmable thermostat is one of the simplest ways to save money on your heating, as you set your heating to turn on and off at specific times throughout the day," said Max Robinson of Turnbull and Scott Heating.

You can program your thermostat to turn off while you sleep or while you're at work and turn back on when you wake up or get home, Robinson added.

4. Change Your Air Filter

Your furnace uses air filters to keep dust from clogging your vents and circulating through your home. When the filters are dirty, your system has to work harder to push air through. Air filters are affordable and easy to switch out, and doing so will help your heating system run more efficiently. You should swap out new air filters every few months.

5. Open Your Vents

Closed vents can waste a lot of energy. When you turn on your heat, make sure your vents are open.

"Blocked or closed vents and registers make furnaces work harder than they should," Ciresi said. "Blocked vents do not allow for proper airflow. The furnace will continue to run but the rooms won't heat up. Always unblock and open all vents and registers before running the furnace."

6. Reduce Hot Water

The energy spent heating your water contributes to your heating bill. You can reduce your hot water usage a few different ways: Take shorter showers, avoid the hottest water settings and wash your clothes in cold water.

Water heaters are often set at a higher temperature than is needed. You can lower your water heater's base temperature to 120 degrees, which is sufficiently hot for most household needs.

7. Use a Space Heater for Small Rooms

Smaller rooms can be heated by an electric space heater. While this method still uses electricity, it's far more energy efficient than using gas heat.

"The rest of the house will be cooler, but this shouldn't be an issue if your entire family is gathered in one room," Robinson said.

8. Check Your Outlets

Even your outlets can leak air and reduce the energy efficiency of your home. Make sure to check your outlets for drafts.

"Electrical outlets in exterior walls are usually a major source of drafts, as it is rare for insulation to be used in these areas, and when it is it is often incorrectly installed," Robinson said. "Luckily it's easy to correct this. Use a simple foam sealant to fill any gaps around the outlet, and place a gasket over the front of the outlet."

9. Check Your Insulation

Your walls, attic and other home areas must be properly insulated. If not, the temperature will be much harder to control. Make sure to check your insulation, or hire a professional if you're not sure how.

10. Find an Alternative Payment Plan

Many energy companies provide alternative payment plans. Some will reduce your bill for reducing your energy consumption, while other plans might lower your payments based on income. Check with your energy provider to see what alternative plans they offer.

If you're doing things yourself, you may want to consider funding these projects with a store credit card that offers you rewards for your purchases. (You can read our review of the Home Depot credit card here.) Before you apply for any new plastic, it's always a good idea to review your credit so you know what types of cards you may qualify for. You can see two of your scores free, updated every 14 days, on Credit.com.

11. Change Your Attire

If you're cold, you can always turn down the temperature a few degrees and bundle up. Don't neglect your feet and head, areas that can lose a lot of body heat. Fuzzy socks and a knit hat should do the trick. And if you're looking to escape the heat? Try a bathing suit and a cool body of water — You can see 28 ideas on how to save for your next big adventure here.

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