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California violent games law temporarily terminated

Ross Miller
·Associate Editor
·1 min read
Conan Schwarzenegger
(225)
Conan Schwarzenegger (225)

Another violent games law has bitten the dust - for a few months, at least. A district judge in California has placed an injunction on the California violent games law, promoted by governor Arnold "Kindergarten Cop" Schwarzenegger, set to take effect on January 1 of next year. Judge Ronald Whyte noted that other rulings have not established a causal link between violence and violent behavior, and that video games are "protected by the First Amendment and that plaintiffs are likely to prevail in their argument that the Act violates the First Amendment."

Video games are protected as freedom of expression, so why can they not be compared to works of art, such as film? Maybe it is due to the level of interactivity found in games create an environment indicative of the player - in other words, Super Metroid is not a work of art, but a video of someone beating the game in under 2 hours is. Any thoughts?