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  • Here's how the Fed's rate forecasts have changed over the years
    Business
    CNBC.com5 hours ago

    Here's how the Fed's rate forecasts have changed over the years

    To understand where the Fed thinks interest rates are headed, you have to connect the dots. Four times a year Federal Reserve policymakers at the Federal Open Market Committee submit their projections about where short-term interest rates are headed. The results are the central bank's so-called dot plot — a visual representation of how many members think rates will hit a given level over the short, medium and longer run. The charts, which the Fed began publishing in 2012, have become a series of tea leaves that many investors like to read for hints about what the FOMC will do next. But those tea leaves can be hard to read in isolation. To give a better view of how the Fed's thinking has changed

  • Apple Falls Below Key Level In Heavy Volume, But Is It A Sell Signal Or No?
    Business
    Investor's Business Daily2 hours ago

    Apple Falls Below Key Level In Heavy Volume, But Is It A Sell Signal Or No?

    Apple (AAPL) is falling nearly 2% in heavy volume, breaking below a significant technical level. With the breach of the 50-day line, that also puts Apple below a prior buy point at 156.75. But the key question here: Does Apple's action result in a sell signal? The short answer is that it depends on how the stock closes today, and whether you're a long-term or short-term shareholder. Apple was down 1.9% to 155.67 in afternoon trading in the stock market today, tumbling as low as 153.83 on Apple Watch connectivity concerns. Volume is more than double normal levels. If Apple closes below the 50-day, it could be seen as a sell signal for those that bought the stock at the 156.75 entry. But we need

  • Politics
    CNBC57 minutes ago

    Big insurance lobby group, Blue Cross Blue Shield oppose Graham-Cassidy Obamacare repeal

    The insurance industry's leading lobbying group and the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association of health plans on Wednesday said they oppose the last-ditch Republican plan to repeal and replace Obamacare. Both America's Health Insurance Plans and BCBSA said the Graham-Cassidy bill could further destabilize the individual insurance market. In its own statement, the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association said, "Although we support providing states with greater flexibility in shaping health care options for their residents, we share the significant concerns of many health care organizations about the proposed Graham-Cassidy bill.