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(Almost) Half of All American States to Get a Minimum Wage Hike in 2021

Yaёl Bizouati-Kennedy
·3 min read
miodrag ignjatovic / Getty Images
miodrag ignjatovic / Getty Images

In light of the gloom and doom of the pandemic and its disastrous ongoing economic effects on small businesses and workers alike, there is a silver lining: On January 1, 2021, 20 states will raise their minimum wages. And that’s especially good news for those whose wages can’t keep up with rental costs.

See: Here’s What the US Minimum Wage Was the Year You Were Born
Find: This Is the Living Wage You Need in All 50 States

The states increasing their minimum hourly wage on January 1 include:

  • Alaska: $10.34 from $10.19

  • Arizona: $12.15 from $12

  • Arkansas: $11 from $10

  • California:$14 from $13

  • Colorado: $12.32 from $12

  • Illinois: $11 from $10

  • Maine: $12.15 from $12

  • Maryland: $11.75 from $11

  • Massachusetts: $13.50 from $12.75

  • Minnesota: $10.08 from $10

  • Missouri: $10.30 from $9.45

  • Montana: $8.75 from $8.65

  • New Jersey: $12 from $11

  • New Mexico: $10.50 from $9

  • New York: $12.50 from $11.80

  • Ohio: $8.80 from $8.70

  • South Dakota: $9.45 from $9.30

  • Vermont: $11.75 from $10.96

  • Washington: $13.69 from $13.50

Following a measure approved by voters during the General Election in November, Florida will also see one of the biggest raises. The state will gradually increase the minimum wage to $15 by 2026. The current minimum hourly wage in the state, which currently stands at $8.56, will increase to $8.65 on January 1 and then to $10 on September 30.

The federal minimum hourly wage hasn’t increased since it had been set at $7.25 in July 2009.

  • Oregon: $12.75 from $12 (on July 1, 2021)

  • Connecticut: $13 from $12 (on August 1, 2021)

  • Virginia: $9.50 from $7.25 (on May 1, 2021)

  • Nevada: $8.75 from $8 (on July 1, 2021)