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Is Amara Holdings (SGX:A34) Using Too Much Debt?

Simply Wall St

Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' So it might be obvious that you need to consider debt, when you think about how risky any given stock is, because too much debt can sink a company. We note that Amara Holdings Limited (SGX:A34) does have debt on its balance sheet. But is this debt a concern to shareholders?

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Debt and other liabilities become risky for a business when it cannot easily fulfill those obligations, either with free cash flow or by raising capital at an attractive price. Part and parcel of capitalism is the process of 'creative destruction' where failed businesses are mercilessly liquidated by their bankers. However, a more usual (but still expensive) situation is where a company must dilute shareholders at a cheap share price simply to get debt under control. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Amara Holdings

What Is Amara Holdings's Net Debt?

As you can see below, Amara Holdings had S$338.2m of debt, at June 2019, which is about the same the year before. You can click the chart for greater detail. However, it also had S$11.2m in cash, and so its net debt is S$327.0m.

SGX:A34 Historical Debt, October 4th 2019

A Look At Amara Holdings's Liabilities

We can see from the most recent balance sheet that Amara Holdings had liabilities of S$72.5m falling due within a year, and liabilities of S$351.1m due beyond that. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of S$11.2m as well as receivables valued at S$13.6m due within 12 months. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by S$398.8m.

This deficit casts a shadow over the S$258.7m company, like a colossus towering over mere mortals. So we definitely think shareholders need to watch this one closely. At the end of the day, Amara Holdings would probably need a major re-capitalization if its creditors were to demand repayment.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). The advantage of this approach is that we take into account both the absolute quantum of debt (with net debt to EBITDA) and the actual interest expenses associated with that debt (with its interest cover ratio).

Amara Holdings shareholders face the double whammy of a high net debt to EBITDA ratio (8.7), and fairly weak interest coverage, since EBIT is just 2.1 times the interest expense. This means we'd consider it to have a heavy debt load. Fortunately, Amara Holdings grew its EBIT by 9.6% in the last year, slowly shrinking its debt relative to earnings. When analysing debt levels, the balance sheet is the obvious place to start. But it is Amara Holdings's earnings that will influence how the balance sheet holds up in the future. So when considering debt, it's definitely worth looking at the earnings trend. Click here for an interactive snapshot.

But our final consideration is also important, because a company cannot pay debt with paper profits; it needs cold hard cash. So it's worth checking how much of that EBIT is backed by free cash flow. In the last three years, Amara Holdings created free cash flow amounting to 5.6% of its EBIT, an uninspiring performance. For us, cash conversion that low sparks a little paranoia about is ability to extinguish debt.

Our View

To be frank both Amara Holdings's level of total liabilities and its track record of managing its debt, based on its EBITDA, make us rather uncomfortable with its debt levels. But at least it's pretty decent at growing its EBIT; that's encouraging. After considering the datapoints discussed, we think Amara Holdings has too much debt. While some investors love that sort of risky play, it's certainly not our cup of tea. Above most other metrics, we think its important to track how fast earnings per share is growing, if at all. If you've also come to that realization, you're in luck, because today you can view this interactive graph of Amara Holdings's earnings per share history for free.

At the end of the day, it's often better to focus on companies that are free from net debt. You can access our special list of such companies (all with a track record of profit growth). It's free.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.