U.S. Markets close in 1 hr 59 mins

Apple's Secret Car Project Ramps Up as iPhone Prep Continues

Don Reisinger
Apple's iPhone Market Share Slips as It Eyes $1 Trillion Valuation

Apple remained quiet over the last week, but that hasn’t stopped news surrounding the company to keep flying.

The iPhone maker this week was the subject of countless reports and rumors, including one that says Apple has received approval to test self-driving car technology in California, suggesting the company is still moving forward with its secretive car project. Meanwhile, Apple was the subject of a new survey this week that found the company is wildly popular among teenagers, and it’s inked a deal to bring iPads and Macs to the NHL.

This is Fortune’s weekly roundup of the biggest Apple news this week. To see last week’s roundup, click here.

But it wasn’t all good news for Apple AAPL . Some MacBook Pro owners reported an odd noise with their computers and Samsung was able to wrest control over the smartphone market once again. An NYU graduate student’s who spent summer last year in an iPhone factory also shed some light on what it might really be like to produce an iPhone.

Read on for all that and more in this week’s Fortune Apple news roundup:

Get Data Sheet, Fortune’s technology newsletter

  • The California Department of Motor Vehicles confirmed on Friday that Apple has received a permit to test self-driving cars in California. The permit suggests that Apple is indeed working on self-driving car technology, confirming a slew of rumors on the topic. Still, Apple hasn’t commented on its plans and it’s possible the company won’t take advantage of its newly awarded permit.
  • Samsung in the first quarter supplanted Apple as the world’s most popular smartphone maker. The Korea-based conglomerate captured 26.1% market share worldwide, topping Apple’s 16.9% share. In the fourth quarter of 2016, Apple stood atop the market with 20.3% share. Samsung at the time could only muster 18.5% market share.
  • Apple has reportedly hired a team of biomedical engineers to treat diabetes, a report said this week. Details on the technology are slim, but a CNBC report said the team is working in Palo Alto, Calif. and it was initially the brainchild of late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs. It’s unknown when, or even if, the diabetes treatment will be released.
  • Qualcomm this week fired back at Apple in response to the iPhone maker’s lawsuit earlier this year. Apple previously sued Qualcomm, alleging that the chipmaker abused its dominant position in the industry and forced phone makers, including Apple, to pay exorbitant royalties. Qualcomm responded this week, saying that its royalties are fair and denied that it’s hurt competition in the chip industry.
  • Apple signed a deal with the National Hockey League to deliver iPads and Macs to teams playing in the Stanley Cup playoffs. Each team has three iPad Pros that will let them evaluate players, find holes in the opponent’s lineup, and more. The NHL plans to roll out iPad Pros to the entire league next season.
  • MacBook Pro owners took to Apple forums this week to complain of a “popping sound” coming from their devices. The users report that the MacBook Pro at seemingly random times will make a sound like someone squeezing a plastic bottle. Some users said that they also heard the sound when the MacBook Pro was working hard on a resource-intensive task. The users, who all own the MacBook Pro Apple released in the fall, reported calling Apple support and were given different methods for addressing the problem. Apple has not publicly commented on the reports and it’s unknown how widespread the problem is. All users who report the popping sound can still use their machines without trouble.
  • Apple’s iPhone is dominant among teenagers, according to a Piper Jaffray Taking Stock With Teens survey. The research firm, which surveyed more than 5,500 kids, said that 76% of U.S. teenagers have an iPhone, up from 74% in the fall. More than 8 in 10 teens say they plan to buy an iPhone in the coming years. Apple Watch is also the most popular smartwatch among teenagers.

One more thing...An NYU graduate student spent last summer working at an iPhone factory in China. This week, he discussed his findings and what it was like to work in the factory. Click here for the major things he discussed about his time working at the facility.

This article was originally published on FORTUNE.com