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Pandemic and sedentary lifestyle increase the risk of serious problems

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Pandemic and Telework = more varicose veins

MONTREAL, March 16, 2021 /CNW Telbec/ - "With the sedentary lifestyle caused by the pandemic, many Canadians are now experiencing various health problems, including venous problems such as varicose veins. Telework is often the cause, as a sitting position for more than two hours without interruption prevents blood from flowing properly. There is every indication that there has been a significant increase in cases over the past year." says Dr. Mandy Wong, president of the Canadian Society of Phlebology (CSP).

This issue will be discussed at VEIN WEEK on 5-11 April, an international medical event in which the CSP will participate.

Varicose vein disease affects 50% of people aged 50 years and over in the country and 15% to 25% of all adults (18% of men and 25% of women). In absolute numbers, 3.7 million Canadians have varicose veins. In the worst cases, the disease will cause the skin to harden, form ulcers and even blood clots.

"Keeping your veins in tip top shape is worthwhile, especially with the ongoing COVID 19 pandemic which encourages people to be sedentary." Treatment of varicose veins by your phlebologist and their encouragement to exercise your calf muscles may reduce your risk of deep vein clots and pulmonary embolism associated with venous disease.

An enemy that is sometimes invisible

Did you know that one in three people can experience pain and varicose veins... without their knowledge? This is because the root of varicose vein disease often starts in the saphenous veins which are only visible with a medical imaging examination. Early varicose vein disease is not always painful. As the disease progresses and the damaged veins dilate and affect more veins, it can become symptomatic and finally visible. Ultrasound examination of the venous symptom early in the disease is important to reduce the extent of damage. Left unchecked, venous disease is progressive. Neglecting it means potentially exposing yourself to serious problems: edema, ulcer, thrombosis, or even pulmonary embolism.

The phlebologist: essential in the prevention and control of varicose veins

To avoid unpleasant surprises and unnecessary suffering, a consultation with a phlebologist is highly recommended. Phlebologists are doctors who specialize in venous and lymphatic diseases who prevent and correct such serious situations, which go far beyond aesthetics. They:

  • Analyze the condition and function of the venous system and lymphatic vessels.

  • Treat all veins (superficial, visible and invisible) and diagnose the dangers of deep veins.

  • Detect and treat problems such as heavy legs, tingling, restless leg syndrome, clots etc.

  • Recognize and help diagnose pelvic varicose veins (abdominal, vaginal and vulvar). Not always apparent, they can cause a lot of pain and congestion, including during intercourse and menstruation.

A stitch in time saves nine

Simple gestures and good lifestyle habits improve the flow of blood flow to the heart. Walking and aerobic activities such as swimming and cycling are highly recommended. Phlebologists also recommend that the legs be raised as often as possible, especially in the evening. People who spend much of the day standing or sitting should be on tiptoe for 2-3 minutes each hour. "Wearing compression stockings also helps reduce venous stasis", says Dr. Wong. "There is a wide variety of over-the-counter compression stockings available in pharmacies making it difficult for people to know which to choose. Consultation with a phlebologist would provide a prescription for the strength of compression best suited your individual condition. Additionally, they can recommend proven supplements that can decrease the swelling and pain in your legs due to varicose vein disease. »

ABOUT

Dr. Mandy Wong

20 years' experience in phlebology utilizing duplex ultrasound diagnosis, liquid sclerotherapy, ultrasound guided foam sclerotherapy and endovenous laser ablation
President, Canadian Society of Phlebology
Diplomate of the American Board of Venous & Lymphatic Medicine
Fellow Member of the Canadian Society of Phlebology
Diplomate of the American Board of Laser Surgery
Medical Director of Restore Dermapure Vein & Skin Centre
Master of Medicine in the Field of Skin Cancer, Queensland University
Postgraduate Diplomate in Practical Dermatology, Cardiff University

SOURCE Canadian Society of Phlebology

Cision
Cision

View original content: http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/March2021/16/c2612.html