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Avoid These 3 Cover Letter Mistakes

Daniel B. Kline, The Motley Fool

Imagine showing up for a job interview a little tipsy wearing mismatched clothes and then talking for the entire time about things not related to the job. Most people would never do that -- yet they make that level of mistake on their cover letter.

Your cover letter is essentially a pre-interview. It's how the employer can learn the things about you that aren't shown on a resume. If you waste that opportunity, you may simply never get an interview, let alone have a real chance at the job.

A person holds a blank piece of paper.

A cover letter is a blank canvas you can make work for you. Image source: Getty Images.

1. You spend the whole time being silly

It's fine to show some personality, or even to have a little fun. Going full absurdist may make the person reading your cover letter laugh, but a laugh isn't the same as someone wanting to interview you.

Don't go too far off the rails. Focus on why you're a good fit for the job, and if your fit is indirect, make your case but be careful to connect the dots. In most cases, if you don't write a traditional cover letter and opt for a silly story or some other form of comedy, your resume is going in the trash (and you'll never know if you got a laugh or a groan).

2. Don't talk about another job

Your cover letter should explain why you want the job being advertised. It should not expound about how your real goal is to be a mountain climber, a poet, or a sheepherder. The people doing the hiring want to think that you're passionate about the position being offered.

It's OK to confess to a hobby, especially if it relates to the work. It's not a great idea to express long-term goals that have nothing to do with the position being offered.

3. You go full-on generic

If your cover letter talks about how you the skills to succeed in any job, the hiring person won't be impressed. The same is true about talking about "drive", "passion", or how hard you work.

Those are all great things, but you need to address the specific job being hired for. Make it clear that you wrote a cover letter for this position. Cite questions raised by the job ad, and explain why you specifically fit.

It's great that you're a hard worker, but relate that in a specific anecdote that ties to what's being asked for in this job ad. Remember that every person sees themselves as qualified, and it's your job to make yourself stand out with why you'll do well in the role being hired for.

Take the time to shine

It's OK to have a rough cover letter that you adapt for every job you apply for, but make sure you adapt it. Many job ads ask questions that aren't answered on your resume. Find a way to address those things in your cover letter.

In many ways, a cover letter is a test as to whether you can follow directions. The company has asked for specific things, and if you ignore them they may well ignore your application.

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