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Bad credit might make marriage a long shot

Cortney Moore

Love might be in the air, but you may have a hard time locking down a partner if you don't have a good credit score, according to a new survey from WalletHub.

A little over half said they would not marry someone who has bad credit.

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Women were more likely than men to refuse a person who doesn't have their personal finances in order -- at 60 percent. Only 41 percent of men agreed with this statement.

These sentiments also extend into the dating field – though respondents were a little more lenient in this regard since it's not a lifelong commitment.

Still, 37 percent of people said they would not date someone with bad credit. Again, women were most likely to kick potential suitors to the side over a poor credit score, whereas men were less likely to do so under the same circumstances.

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Four in 10 people believe "irresponsible spending is a bigger turnoff than bad breath" and that 46 percent of people would actually break up with a significant other if they found out they spend irresponsibly.

Despite this, only 7 percent of people said money problems were the biggest reason to break up with someone. The remaining 93 percent cited other reasons as being bigger issues, which include cheating (55 percent), inconsistent values (20 percent) and constant arguing (18 percent).

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Respondents also had an interesting perspective when it comes down to financial infidelity. More than half of the people agreed that financial infidelity can be worse than cheating.

Fifty-seven percent of women agreed with the statement, while 49 percent of men said the same.

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Echoing this statement, 35 percent of respondents said financial secrets are the "worst" type of money problem to have in a relationship. Irresponsible spending was a close second at 27 percent followed by a high debt level at 15 percent and not saving for the future at 12 percent.

For all the concern about partners with bad credit scores, only 8 percent of respondents cited "ruining your credit score" as the worst money problem to have in a relationship.

Contrary to their previous answers, the respondents of WalletHub's survey believe there are ways to avoid relationship-based money problems.

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Getting separate bank accounts and discussing purchases before making them were the most popular answers among the respondents at 38 percent and 28 percent, respectively. Joint finances and prenuptial agreements were the group's next picks at 24 percent and 10 percent.

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