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Battleship Legend: The Amazing World War II Story of the USS Massachusetts

Robert Farley
By USN (photographed from USS Hornet (CV-12)) - Official U.S. Navy photo [1] available at Navsource.org, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=25364911

Robert Farley

History, Europe

A dangerous mission.

Battleship Legend: The Amazing World War II Story of the USS Massachusetts

Although both British and American planners hoped that French resistance to the invasion would be minimal, a major French naval presence at Casablanca threatened to disrupt the operation. The French squadron at Casablanca included several large destroyers and the Jean Bart, an incomplete but mildly functional battleship that had escaped just prior to the Nazi conquest of France. Massachusetts and several escorts were detailed to subdue this force. 

The U.S. Navy began construction of its first fast battleships in 1937, with the two ships of the North Carolina class. The restrictions of the Washington and London Naval Treaties had imposed a battleship “holiday,” and mandated limits on the size of new warships. Treaty requirements limited displacement to thirty-five thousand tons, and (after Japan’s exit from the treaty triggered an escalator clause) gun size to sixteen inches. While intermediate plans had focused on relatively slow ships (around twenty-three knots), war-game experience and intelligence about the development of foreign ships made clear that this would prove far too slow, and designers eventually opted for a speed of twenty-seven knots. The U.S. Navy followed up the two in the North Carolina class with the four South Dakotas. Initial plans for the South Dakotas again called for a reduction in speed, which would allow them to operate with the older ships of the battle line.

(This first appeared in February 2017.)

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