U.S. Markets closed

Biggest Boomtowns in Every State

Cynthia Measom

Boomtown. The word sounds like it’s describing an explosion — and in a way, it is. Boomtowns are considered the fastest-growing cities in America due to rapid business and population growth.

One example of a boomtown with explosive population growth is Kirkland, Washington, which saw the biggest five-year percentage change in population at 76.8% — a huge difference from the national average of 3.84%.

GOBankingRates determined the fastest-growing cities in the U.S. by looking at the five- and 10-year changes in population, occupied housing units, owner-occupied housing units and per capita income of more than 1,600 cities with populations under 500,000. Data was sourced from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2007, 2012 and 2017 American Community Surveys.

Alabama: Hunstville

  • 5-year change in population: 5.9%
  • 10-year change in population: 14.4%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 3.8%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 10.8%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 9.1%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 16.8%

The five- and 10-year percentage changes in population in Huntsville, Alabama, exceeded the national averages of 3.84% and 7.45%, respectively. In addition, the five- and 10-year percentage of change in occupied housing units exceeded the national averages of 3.12% and 6.47%, respectively. Hoover and Tuscaloosa are two other high-populous cities in Alabama that are considered boomtowns.

 

Alaska: Juneau

  • 5-year change in population: 2.5%
  • 10-year change in population: 5.1%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 3.9%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 4.3%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 10.5%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 26.4%

In Juneau, the five-year percentage change in owner-occupied housing units was 3.9%, which exceeded the national average of 0.46%. The city’s 10-year percentage change in owner-occupied housing units of 4.3% was also higher than the national average of 1.01%. Anchorage and Fairbanks are two other familiar boomtowns in this state.

Arizona: San Luis

  • 5-year change in population: 23.9%
  • 10-year change in population: 104.2%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 13.9%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 106.2%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 26.2%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 64.7%

At 104.2%, San Luis, Arizona, had the third-biggest percentage change in population over 10 years of all the cities on this list. It also experienced the second-largest percentage change in occupied housing units over 10 years, at 124.5%.

But perhaps the most notable statistic is the decade-long change in owner-occupied housing units: San Luis ranks No. 1 in this category with nearly 3,000 new units, a whopping 106.2% change. The city also had the biggest 10-year percentage change in per capita income.

Goodyear, Marana and Surprise are three other boomtowns in the state you might know.

Arkansas: Bentonville

  • 5-year change in population: 25.2%
  • 10-year change in population: 47.6%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 13%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 31.4%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 22.6%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 44%

The five-year change in population in Bentonville, Arkansas — the home of Walmart — was more than 6 1/2 times the national average, and the 10-year change in population nearly matched that pace. Other boomtowns in the state include Rogers, Benton and Fayetteville.

California: Coachella

  • 5-year change in population: 9.2%
  • 10-year change in population: 44.2%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 41.9%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 96.5%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 19.7%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 22.9%

Located in the namesake valley east of Palm Springs, Coachella had the second-biggest percentage change in occupied housing units over five years at 44.1%. The city also had the third-largest five-year percentage change in the amount of owner-occupied housing units at 41.9%. Overall, the study found a huge number of boomtowns in California. Irvine, Santa Clarita and Oakland are among the most well-known.

Colorado: Broomfield

  • 5-year change in population: 15%
  • 10-year change in population: 25.5%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 15.4%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 31.7%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 15.2%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 38.5%

Broomfield’s per capita income from five years to 10 years increased 23.3 percentage points. Plus, the 10-year change in per capita income in the city is almost double the national average of 19.10%. Other boomtowns in the state include Aurora, Boulder and Colorado Springs.

Connecticut: Westport

  • 5-year change in population: 4.8%
  • 10-year change in population: 11.5%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 1.4%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 2.3%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 22.4%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 20.9%

At $19,909 Westport, Connecticut, had the biggest five-year change in the amount of per capita income. And at $18,795, the city had the biggest 10-year change in the amount of per capita income. In this state, other boomtowns include Stamford and Bridgeport.

Delaware: Newark

  • 5-year change in population: 5%
  • 10-year change in population: 11.1%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: -2.6%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 9.9%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 7.1%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 24%

The five- and 10-year percentage changes in population in Newark exceed national averages. Owner-occupied housing units, however, saw a significant decline over five years. The First State only had two other cities qualify as boomtowns in this study: Dover and Wilmington.

Florida: Four Corners

  • 5-year change in population: 37.8%
  • 10-year change in population: 64.1%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 27.6%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 28.6%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 14.9%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 3%

At 37.8%, Four Corners had the second-biggest percentage change in population over five years. Although the state’s 10-year change in population — 64.1% — doesn’t rank in the top three, it far exceeds the national average of 7.45%. The Sunshine State also has plenty of other boomtowns, including Miami, Orlando and Tampa.

Georgia: Newnan

  • 5-year change in population: 12.4%
  • 10-year change in population: 67.5%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 21.7%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 89.4%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 25%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 32.1%

A suburb of Atlanta, Newnan’s five-year percentage change in occupied housing units exceeded the national average by 12.68 percentage points. Meanwhile, the five-year percentage change in owner-occupied housing units eclipsed the national average by 21.24 percentage points. Atlanta, Gainesville and Smyrna are all examples of boomtowns in Georgia.

Hawaii: Kahului

  • 5-year change in population: 17.8%
  • 10-year change in population: 35.5%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 14.9%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 15.5%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 6.6%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 20.9%

The five-year change in population in Kahului exceeded the national average of 3.84% by 13.96 percentage points. The 10-year change in population shows an even greater increase over the national average of 7.45%, at 28.05 percentage points. The Aloha State features more boomtowns than you might think, such as Pearl City and Kailua.

Idaho: Meridian

  • 5-year change in population: 22.2%
  • 10-year change in population: 57.8%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 29%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 53.8%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 12.7%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 17.6%

In Meridian, the five-year change in owner-occupied housing units at 29% far exceeds the national average of 0.46%. The same goes for the 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units at 53.8% versus the national average of 1.01%. Post Falls, Caldwell and Rexburg are also considered boomtowns within Idaho.

Illinois: Oswego

  • 5-year change in population: 11.4%
  • 10-year change in population: 45.6%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 7.6%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 39.7%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 7.1%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 26.7%

Although the five-year percentage changes in occupied and owner-occupied housing units in Oswego, Illinois, aren’t that many percentage points above the national averages, the 10-year percentage changes in the same categories are. For example, the 10-year percentage change in occupied housing units is 45.7% versus the national average of 6.47%, and the 10-year percentage change in owner-occupied housing units is 39.7% versus the national average of 1.01%. Other towns in the state that are also considered boomtowns include Normal, Huntley and Batavia.

Indiana: Carmel

  • 5-year change in population: 10.7%
  • 10-year change in population: 37.4%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 12%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 42%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 7.2%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 28.9%

In Carmel, the 10-year change in occupied and owner-occupied housing units both exceeded the national averages by far: 44.6% compared to 6.47% and 42% compared to 1.01%. The reason might be because people in the city had money to spend: At $12,497, the city had the third-biggest change in the amount of per capita income over 10 years. Additional boomtowns in the state include places like West Lafayette, Noblesville and Jeffersonville.

Iowa: Ankeny

  • 5-year change in population: 23%
  • 10-year change in population: 42.4%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 10.2%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 26.5%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 12.2%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 23.7%

Considering that the national averages for five-year change in population and 10-year change in population are 3.84% and 7.45%, respectively, Ankeny, Iowa, is growing by leaps and bounds. The city’s five-year population change was 19.16 percentage points higher than the national average, and its 10-year population change was 34.95 percentage points higher. West Des Moines, Marion and Ames are all considered boomtowns in this state.

 

Kansas: Overland Park

  • 5-year change in population: 6.7%
  • 10-year change in population: 12.6%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 1.4%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 7.6%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 9.9%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 18.1%

The five-year percentage change in owner-occupied housing units in Overland Park only slightly exceeded the national average. The 10-year percentage change in owner-occupied housing units, however, was more significant, exceeding the national average of 1.01% by 6.59 percentage points. Other boomtowns in the state include Lenexa, Leawood and Olathe.

Kentucky: Georgetown

  • 5-year change in population: 10.8%
  • 10-year change in population: 30.8%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 10%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 32.7%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 9.9%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 24.4%

Georgetown’s 10-year percentage change in occupied housing units of 36.6% greatly exceeded the national average of 6.47%. The 10-year percentage change in owner-occupied housing units of 32.7% was equally impressive in this small town outside of Lexington. Additional boomtowns in this state include Independence, Lexington and Jeffersontown.

See: You’d Be Rich Today If You Bought a Home Here 20 Years Ago

Louisiana: New Orleans

  • 5-year change in population: 13.7%
  • 10-year change in population: 29%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 6.4%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 43.6%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 12%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 28.4%

New Orleans had the second-biggest five-year change in total population by the number of people at 46,775. The Big Easy also had 22,149 additional owner-occupied housing units, the largest 10-year change in the study. Other boomtowns in the state include the cities of Metairie, Lake Charles and Bossier City.

Lewiston: Maine

  • 5-year change in population: -1%
  • 10-year change in population: -4.2%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 8.1%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 0.6%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 12%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 26.6%

Lewiston’s five-year percentage change in per capita income of 12% exceeded the national average of 11.14% by only 0.86 percentage points. The 10-year percentage change in per capita income of 26.6%, however, exceeded the national average of 19.10% by 7.5 percentage points. Other boomtowns in the state include Portland and Bangor.

Maryland: Waldorf

  • 5-year change in population: 6.2%
  • 10-year change in population: 183.3%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 6.8%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 162.9%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 9.7%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 12.4%

The city that experienced the biggest percentage change in population over 10 years — at 183.3% — was Waldorf. In addition to that, the city had the biggest percentage change in occupied and owner-occupied housing units over 10 years, with increases of 198.6% and 162.9%, respectively. Other boomtowns in the state include Glen Burnie, Odenton and Severn.

Massachusetts: Somerville

  • 5-year change in population: 5.3%
  • 10-year change in population: 13%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 7.7%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 9.9%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 33.1%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 44%

At 33.1%, Somerville had the second-largest five-year percentage change in per capita income of all the boomtowns here. At $11,047 and $13,557, the city also saw the second-biggest five- and 10-year changes, respectively, in the amount of per capita income. Other boomtowns in the Bay State include Wakefield, Melrose and Beverly.

Michigan: Ann Arbor

  • 5-year change in population: 4%
  • 10-year change in population: 5.5%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 4.8%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 0%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 17.8%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 30%

Despite seeing no change in owner-occupied housing units over a decade-long period, Ann Arbor’s per capita income greatly exceeded the national average in the same time. Home to the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor’s 10-year percentage change was 30%, whereas the national average was 19.10%. Residents in Rochester Hills, Kalamazoo and Wyoming are living in boomtowns, too.

Minnesota: Maple Grove

  • 5-year change in population: 10.6%
  • 10-year change in population: 14.5%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 9.9%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 13.8%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 9.4%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 20%

In Maple Grove, the five- and 10-year percentage changes in occupied housing units exceeded the national averages. Its five-year percentage change of 13.3% exceeded the national average of 3.12% — a 10.18 percentage point increase. Additional boomtowns here are Prior Lake, Moorhead and Minneapolis.

Mississippi: Southaven

  • 5-year change in population: 7%
  • 10-year change in population: 23.5%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 3.3%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 20.5%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 8.8%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 18.6%

In Southaven, Mississippi, the five-year percentage change in population of 7% exceeded the national average of 3.84% by 3.16 percentage points. And the 10-year percentage change in population of 23.5% exceeded the national average of 7.45% by 16.05 percentage points. Olive Branch, Pearl and Tupelo are all additional boomtowns in the state.

Missouri: Wentzville

  • 5-year change in population: 23.9%
  • 10-year change in population: 89.9%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 18.4%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 91.6%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 5.4%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 19.1%

Wentzville — a suburb of St. Louis — saw its five-year percentage change in population of 23.9% exceed the national average of 3.84%. And the 10-year percentage change in population of 89.9% exceeded the national average of 7.45% by a whopping 82.45 percentage points. Other boomtowns located in Missouri include O’Fallon, Columbia and Kansas City.

Montana: Bozeman

  • 5-year change in population: 14.7%
  • 10-year change in population: 23.8%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 13%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 31.5%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 10.1%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 24.4%

One of Montana’s more populous cities, Bozeman experienced a 10-year increase of 31.5% in owner-occupied housing units, which was much higher than the national percentage of 1.01% during that same time span. Additional boomtowns in the state include Missoula and Billings.

Nebraska: Omaha

  • 5-year change in population: 12.2%
  • 10-year change in population: 21.9%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 9.2%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 16.6%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 12.4%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 24.2%

It’s getting more crowded in Nebraska’s largest city. With an influx of 50,392 people, Omaha had the biggest five-year change in total population by number of people in this study. The city also had the biggest five- and 10-year changes in the number of occupied housing units, at 18,009 and 29,317, respectively. As far as owner-occupied housing units, the city had the third-largest five- and 10-year changes, at 8,841 units and 15,031 units, respectively. Lincoln, Kearney and Bellevue are some of the state’s other larger cities that are considered boomtowns.

Nevada: Enterprise

  • 5-year change in population: 37.7%
  • 10-year change in population: 138.2%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 30.7%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 94.4%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 3.5%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 0.6%

At 37.7%, Enterprise had the third-biggest percentage change in population over five years, and the second-biggest percentage change in population over 10 years, at 138.2%. The city also had the second-biggest 10-year change in total population by the number of people, at 90,365. As for the number of owner-occupied housing units, the city saw the third-largest jump over five years of all the cities in this study with 7,197 units. Henderson, Whitney and Reno are other boomtowns located in the state.

New Hampshire: Dover

  • 5-year change in population: 2.9%
  • 10-year change in population: 10.6%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 8.1%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: -1%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 15.3%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 20.6%

Dover’s per capita income increased from $4,777 to $6,134 within a five-year span. Additionally, the five-year and 10-year percentage changes in per capita income exceeded the national averages. Boomtown locations in New Hampshire include Rochester, Manchester and Concord.

New Jersey: Hoboken

  • 5-year change in population: 8.5%
  • 10-year change in population: 33%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 4.5%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 20.7%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 15%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 17.3%

In Hoboken, the five-year percentage change in population of 8.5% exceeded the national average of 3.84% by 4.66 percentage points. And the 10-year percentage change in population of 33.5% exceeded the national average of 7.45% by 26.05 percentage points. At $10,597, Hoboken had the third-largest five-year change in the amount of per capita income. Rahway and Jersey City — another city located right across the Hudson River — are other boomtowns in New Jersey.

New Mexico: Santa Fe

  • 5-year change in population: 21.5%
  • 10-year change in population: 27.3%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 19%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 31.3%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 0.7%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 6.1%

Santa Fe’s population growth is evident. The five-year percentage change in population of 21.5% exceeded the national average by 17.66 percentage points, and the 10-year percentage change in population of 27.3% exceeded the national average by 19.85 percentage points. If you live in Rio Rancho, Carlsbad or Hobbs, you’re also living in a boomtown.

 

New York: Uniondale

  • 5-year change in population: 28.1%
  • 10-year change in population: 24.9%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 18.8%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 4.4%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 19.9%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 24.9%

The five-year percentage change in population of 28.1% was not the highest in the study, but it far exceeded the national average of 3.84%. Over the course of a decade, Uniondale’s population increased by 6,303 people — a 24.9% increase. Other boomtowns in the state include Saratoga Springs and Spring Valley.

North Carolina: Raleigh

  • 5-year change in population: 11%
  • 10-year change in population: 31.5%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 7.1%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 22%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 15%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 19%

North Carolina’s state capital had the third-largest five-year change in total population by the number of people. The city also had the second-biggest five- and 10-year changes in the number of occupied housing units at 16,850 and 39,877, respectively. An influx of 16,547 owner-occupied housing units was also the second-biggest 10-year change in the study. Additional boomtowns in the state include Cary, Wake Forest and Concord.

 

North Dakota: West Fargo

  • 5-year change in population: 28.3%
  • 10-year change in population: 60%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 19.4%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 47.4%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 25.2%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 46.1%

At 25.2%, West Fargo had the fifth-biggest five-year percentage change in per capita income. The Peace Garden State only has a few other boomtowns: Bismarck, Minot and Grand Forks.

Ohio: Hilliard

  • 5-year change in population: 18.7%
  • 10-year change in population: 14.1%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 21.9%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 15%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 19.9%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 29.6%

The 10-year change in the number of occupied housing units in Hilliard was 1,887, a relatively low amount compared to other cities in the study. This suburb of Columbus, however, experienced a respectable 10-year increase in average per capita income at $9,591. Additional boomtowns in the state include Mason, Grove City and Delaware.

Oklahoma: Owasso

  • 5-year change in population: 17.5%
  • 10-year change in population: 30%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 19.4%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 35.4%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 8.4%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 21.3%

In Owasso — a suburb of Tulsa — the 10-year percentage change in occupied housing units of 35.8% greatly exceeded the national average of 6.47%. The 10-year percentage change in owner-occupied housing units of 35.4% also exceeded the national average of 1.01% by far. Other boomtowns in Oklahoma include Moore, Edmond and Broken Arrow.

Oregon: Hillsboro

  • 5-year change in population: 11.3%
  • 10-year change in population: 23%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 10.1%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 24.3%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 19.9%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 40.1%

Located west of Portland, Hillsboro’s 10-year percentage change in occupied and owner-occupied housing units far exceeded the national averages. For example, the 10-year percentage change of 26.3% in occupied housing units was 19.83 percentage points more than the national average of 6.47%. Other boomtown locations in Oregon include Bend, Oregon City and Redmond.

Pennsylvania: State College

  • 5-year change in population: 0.5%
  • 10-year change in population: 6.6%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 30.4%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 27.8%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 24.5%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 36.9%

Home to Penn State University’s main campus, this major college town saw a per capita income increase of 24.5% over five years, more than double the national average of 11.14%. Additional boomtown locations in the Keystone State are Bethel Park, Williamsport and Plum.

Rhode Island: Providence

  • 5-year change in population: 0.7%
  • 10-year change in population: 5.5%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: -2.8%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: -3.7%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 11.8%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 19.7%

The Rhode Island state capital’s five and 10-year percentage changes in per capita income were remarkably close to the national averages, exceeding them by less than a percentage point each. Even though Rhode Island is a small state, it has other boomtowns, including Cranston and East Providence.

 

South Carolina: Mount Pleasant

  • 5-year change in population: 18.7%
  • 10-year change in population: 19.4%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 15.7%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 17%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 23.9%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 23.1%

Mount Pleasant is a large suburb of Charleston, and it’s shown quite a bit of grown over the last decade. The 10-year change in number of occupied housing units was 5,915. In the same time, it added 3,328 owner-occupied housing units. Additional boomtowns in South Carolina include Charleston, Goose Creek and Columbia.

 

South Dakota: Sioux Falls

  • 5-year change in population: 10.3%
  • 10-year change in population: 15.9%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 10.9%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 14.8%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 10.6%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 21%

Sioux Falls is South Dakota’s largest city, and it saw a 10-year percentage change in owner-occupied housing units of 14.8%, which exceeded the national average of 1.01%. Only two other South Dakota cities qualified as boomtowns: Rapid City and Aberdeen.

Tennessee: Mount Juliet

  • 5-year change in population: 27.9%
  • 10-year change in population: 73%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 19%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 55.2%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 10.1%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 19.6%

In Mount Juliet — a suburb of Nashville — the 10-year percentage change in population of 73% exceeded the national average of 7.45% by 65.55 percentage points. Other boomtowns in Tennessee include Murfreesboro, Franklin and Clarksville.

 

Texas: Conroe

  • 5-year change in population: 34.3%
  • 10-year change in population: 60.4%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 55.1%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 80%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 41%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 52.7%

Head north up Interstate 45 from Houston and you’ll hit the city of Conroe, which had the second-biggest five-year percentage change in owner-occupied housing units at 55.1%. In addition, the city experienced the largest five-year percentage change in per capita income — an incredible 41%. The list of boomtowns in Texas is vast, but a few of the more notable ones include Frisco, Leander and Kyle.

Utah: South Jordan

  • 5-year change in population: 28.2%
  • 10-year change in population: 60.3%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 34.1%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 60.6%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 26.8%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 33.9%

At 26.8%, South Jordan — a suburb of Salt Lake City — had the third-biggest five-year percentage change in per capita income. And the city’s 10-year percentage change in per capita income of 33.9% exceeded the national average of 19.10% by 14.8 percentage points. Additional boomtowns in the state include Lehi, Draper and Holladay.

 

Vermont: Burlington

  • 5-year change in population: 0.5%
  • 10-year change in population: 10%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: -7.9%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: -5.9%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 3.3%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 12.7%

In Burlington, the percentage change in population increased by 10% over 10 years. However, occupied housing units over a five-year time span declined, as did owner-occupied housing units. Given these less-than-stellar numbers, it might be unsurprising to learn that there are no other boomtowns in Vermont.

Virginia: Leesburg

  • 5-year change in population: 18.1%
  • 10-year change in population: 41.1%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 21.4%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 22.8%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 12.9%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 19.6%

Travel up the Potomac River and you’ll eventually come across Leesburg. This small city straddling the border of Virginia and Maryland saw its population increase by 18.1% over five years. And the 10-year percentage change in population of 41.1% exceeded the national average of 7.45% by 33.95 percentage points. Other boomtowns in Virginia include Arlington, Harrisonburg and Charlottesville.

 

Washington: Kirkland

  • 5-year change in population: 76.8%
  • 10-year change in population: 89.9%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 79%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 75.3%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 10.1%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 16.8%

Kirkland had the biggest percentage change in population over five years in the study at 76.8%. The Seattle suburb also had the biggest percentage change in owner-occupied housing units over five years at 79%, as well as the biggest five-year change in the amount of owner-occupied housing units at 10,192. Additional boomtowns in the state of Washington include Sammamish, Pasco and Marysville.

West Virginia: Morgantown

  • 5-year change in population: 0.5%
  • 10-year change in population: 11.2%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 9.1%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 1.8%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 24.1%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 49.4%

At 49.4%, Morgantown had the third-biggest 10-year percentage change in per capita income. Other boomtowns in the state include Wheeling and Parkersburg.

Wisconsin: Madison

  • 5-year change in population: 6.1%
  • 10-year change in population: 13.2%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 1%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 5.6%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 11.7%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 22.8%

In Madison, the 10-year percentage change in the population of 13.2% exceeded the national average of 7.45%. Other boomtown locations in the Badger State are Franklin, Sun Prairie and Fitchburg.

 

Wyoming: Cheyenne

  • 5-year change in population: 5.7%
  • 10-year change in population: 14.1%
  • 5-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 9.8%
  • 10-year change in owner-occupied housing units: 15.2%
  • 5-year change in per capita income: 13%
  • 10-year change in per capita income: 24.4%

Cheyenne’s 10-year percentage change in population of 14.1% exceeded the national average of 7.45% by 6.65 percentage points. The city’s 10-year percentage change in per capita income of 24.4% also surpassed the national average of 19.10% by 5.3 percentage points. Other boomtown locations in the state include Gillette and Casper.

Biggest Boomtowns in Every State

When it comes to the locations of boomtowns, many can be found within the metro areas of major principal cities. For example, Broomfield, which is the largest boomtown in Colorado, is also a suburb north of Denver. And Conroe, which is the largest boomtown in Texas, is a suburb north of Houston.

Several boomtowns on the list also feature major colleges. For example, Ann Arbor, Michigan, is home to the University of Michigan and Morgantown, West Virginia, is home to West Virginia University.

To qualify as a boomtown on this list, cities had to have a population of less than 500,000. Some of the boomtowns, such as Omaha, Nebraska, and New Orleans are growing so quickly that they are fast approaching that 500,000 threshold, which means that they won’t be considered boomtowns in the near future.

And finally, the capital cities of several states serve as boomtowns, including Santa Fe, New Mexico; Raleigh, North Carolina; and Madison, Wisconsin. Capital cities often double as college towns, which has its advantages. For example, public employment is prominent in capital cities, and they help to attract private industries that work in support of public organizations, such as research companies working with universities.

Click through to see places in America that are getting poorer.

More on Making Money and the Economy

Chris Jennings contributed to the reporting of this article.

Methodology: GOBankingRates determined the biggest boomtowns in every state by analyzing 1,600 U.S. cities with populations under 500,000 and evaluated them by the following criteria: (1) five-year change in total population by percentage; (2) five-year change in total population by number of people; (3) 10-year change in total population by percentage; (4) 10-year change in total population by number of people; (5) five-year change in amount of occupied housing units by percentage; (6) five-year change in amount of occupied housing units by number of units; (7) 10-year change in amount of occupied housing units by percentage; (8) 10-year change in amount of occupied housing units by number of units; (9) five-year change in amount of owner-occupied homes by percentage; (10) five-year change in amount of owner-occupied homes by number of homes; (11) 10-year change in amount of owner-occupied homes by percentage; (12) 10-year change in amount of owner-occupied homes by number of homes; (13) five-year change in per capita income by percentage; (14) five-year change in per capita income by dollars; (15) 10-year change in per capita income by percentage; (16) 10-year change in per capita income by dollars; all data was sourced from the 2017, 2012 and 2007 American Community Surveys from the U.S. Census Bureau. All factors were scored, added together and cities then ranked, with the best-scoring city being the biggest boomtown in the state.

This article originally appeared on GOBankingRates.com: Biggest Boomtowns in Every State