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Bill Clinton on his favorite ‘fictional’ president: ‘Donald Trump’

·1 min read

Bill Clinton says Donald Trump is one of his favorite “fictional” presidents, lumping the real-life ex-commander in chief in with some of film and TV’s most famous characters who have occupied the Oval Office.

The former president knocked Trump during a lighthearted segment called “Ask a President” on CBS’s “The Late Late Show” on Wednesday night.

“Oh man, there’ve been so many good ones,” Clinton said when asked to name his fave faux POTUS.

Clinton ticked off a list of actors, including Tony Goldwyn, who played President Fitzgerald Grant on “Scandal,” and Martin Sheen, who took on the role of President Josiah Bartlet on “The West Wing.”

“I liked Michael Douglas. I loved Harrison Ford,” Clinton continued.

“And Morgan Freeman. And Donald Trump,” the 42nd president deadpanned to laughs from host James Corden and the audience.

Clinton has been a fierce critic of Trump, who defeated his wife, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, in the 2016 White House race.

In remarks at the 2020 Democratic National Convention, Bill Clinton said Trump defined his job as president as “spending hours a day watching TV and zapping people on social media.”

“Denying, distracting and demeaning works great if you’re trying to entertain and inflame. But in a real crisis, it collapses like a house of cards,” Clinton said at the time.

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