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Revealed: the most expensive car to run in the UK

A BMW 520d (G30): despite running costs, the brand remains ever popular as owners say the running costs are worth it. Photo: Getty

BMW cars are the most expensive to run in the UK, despite being used the least, research shows.

Drivers of the German-engineered car spend £2,411 on running costs every year – 29% more than the average four-wheeler, which is £1,688 to run, according to a study.

This includes annual spend on fuel, insurance, car cleaning, tax/MOT and extra costs such as parking tickets.

Separate to the study though BMW cars remain ever popular with a loyal customer base and a deserved reputation of being among the most sought after cars, known for engineering prowess, luxury and reliability.

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Despite this, BMW drivers use their cars the fewest times over the course of a year, making just 292 journeys on average. This equates to £8.26 being spent every single time a BMW is driven – 59% more than the £5.18 cost-per-use for a Citroen, the study by MoneySuperMarket reveals.

Toyotas are almost as expensive to run, costing owners about £2,085 a year. With 333 journeys being made annually, this equates to about £6.26 per use.

Volkswagens take the third spot, costing about £1,900. Making about 321 journeys a year, this breaks down to £5.92 per use.

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And Peugeot comes fourth, at an annual cost of £1,785 over about 374 journeys. This equates to £4.77 per drive.

Meanwhile, Citroen (£1,647), Ford (£1,756) and Vauxhall (£1,770) owners have the lowest running costs.

Fuel makes up the bulk of the annual outlay, putting drivers back an average £1,124 a year. Insurance (£374), road tax (£170), routine maintenance (£138) and cleaning (£60) account for the rest of the expenditure.

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The research also found Londoners spend the most on their cars annually, at about £2,771 – over £1,000 more than those in Scotland, at £1,526 per year.