U.S. markets closed
  • S&P 500

    3,269.96
    -40.15 (-1.21%)
     
  • Dow 30

    26,501.60
    -157.51 (-0.59%)
     
  • Nasdaq

    10,911.59
    -274.00 (-2.45%)
     
  • Russell 2000

    1,538.48
    -23.10 (-1.48%)
     
  • Crude Oil

    35.72
    -0.45 (-1.24%)
     
  • Gold

    1,878.80
    +10.80 (+0.58%)
     
  • Silver

    23.72
    +0.35 (+1.52%)
     
  • EUR/USD

    1.1641
    -0.0037 (-0.31%)
     
  • 10-Yr Bond

    0.8600
    +0.0250 (+2.99%)
     
  • GBP/USD

    1.2953
    +0.0030 (+0.23%)
     
  • USD/JPY

    104.6350
    +0.0250 (+0.02%)
     
  • BTC-USD

    13,728.89
    -97.43 (-0.70%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    265.42
    +1.78 (+0.68%)
     
  • FTSE 100

    5,577.27
    -4.48 (-0.08%)
     
  • Nikkei 225

    22,977.13
    -354.81 (-1.52%)
     

Bring a nutritionist to the grocery store with you — courtesy of the ShopWell app

Stephanie Topacio Long
<p>They say that ignorance is bliss, but when a lack of knowledge has a negative impact on your health, the saying suddenly doesn’t seem to hold true. Fortunately, if you don’t like being caught unaware when it comes to nutrition, you don’t have to be. There are numerous apps out there that can help you eat better, whether that means <a href="http://www.digitaltrends.com/home/smartplate-knows-the-nutrition-info-of-your-meals/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:determining the nutritional value of food on your plate" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">determining the nutritional value of food on your plate</a> or making healthy choices at the grocery store.</p> <p><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/shopwell-healthy-diet-grocery/id393422300?mt=8" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:ShopWell" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">ShopWell</a> is for doing the latter. Operated under registered dietitian nutritionist Lara Felton, the app offers personalized food scores for users’ unique needs and tools like Quick Tips and Smart Lists for specific conditions, from high cholesterol to food allergies. The company’s goal is to make nutritional information digestible (pun intended) so that it’s easy to bring home healthy food from the grocery store.</p> <p><strong>Related:</strong> <a href="http://www.digitaltrends.com/photography/food-porn-instagram-psychology/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Food porn psychology: New study reveals Instagramming your food makes it taste better" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Food porn psychology: New study reveals Instagramming your food makes it taste better</a></p> <p>ShopWell’s scoring system is particularly interesting. Scores are based on a variety of factors, including age, gender, and users’ ingredient and nutrition preferences. Personalized scores are generated on a 1-100 scale, and then color coded as green (strong matches; between 70-100), yellow (medium matches; 40-69), and red (weak matches; 0-39). Naturally, green items are considered best for you, while yellow indicates caution and red means that you should reconsider or eat only in moderation. A warning is shown if a product contains one of the allergens you’ve listed.</p> <p>ShopWell’s algorithm is based on carefully gathered information from registered dietitians and medical professionals. Furthermore, a team of registered dietitians, Stanford University statisticians, and engineers work to continuously evaluate food products and assess the nutritional value of products on the market. “I’m pretty intent on making sure the ingredients are updated and accurate,” said Felton in an email to Digital Trends.</p>  <p>“As the digital dietitian for the ShopWell community, I feel a true responsibility to ensuring every consumer has access to their nutrition information, can easily use our app to see how well they are shopping for their families, and above all, offer healthier recommendations,” said Felton. “I can’t tell you how much I enjoy seeing that over 70 percent of people buy the better-for-you recommendations we make!”</p> <p>ShopWell is available on iOS and Android devices, as well as on the Web.</p> <div> <div> <div><b>Also watch:</b> MSI’s Vortex brings 4K gaming anywhere in your home</div> </div></div> <div> <div><div><div>Please enable Javascript to watch this video</div></div></div> </div>

They say that ignorance is bliss, but when a lack of knowledge has a negative impact on your health, the saying suddenly doesn’t seem to hold true. Fortunately, if you don’t like being caught unaware when it comes to nutrition, you don’t have to be. There are numerous apps out there that can help you eat better, whether that means determining the nutritional value of food on your plate or making healthy choices at the grocery store.

ShopWell is for doing the latter. Operated under registered dietitian nutritionist Lara Felton, the app offers personalized food scores for users’ unique needs and tools like Quick Tips and Smart Lists for specific conditions, from high cholesterol to food allergies. The company’s goal is to make nutritional information digestible (pun intended) so that it’s easy to bring home healthy food from the grocery store.

Related: Food porn psychology: New study reveals Instagramming your food makes it taste better

ShopWell’s scoring system is particularly interesting. Scores are based on a variety of factors, including age, gender, and users’ ingredient and nutrition preferences. Personalized scores are generated on a 1-100 scale, and then color coded as green (strong matches; between 70-100), yellow (medium matches; 40-69), and red (weak matches; 0-39). Naturally, green items are considered best for you, while yellow indicates caution and red means that you should reconsider or eat only in moderation. A warning is shown if a product contains one of the allergens you’ve listed.

ShopWell’s algorithm is based on carefully gathered information from registered dietitians and medical professionals. Furthermore, a team of registered dietitians, Stanford University statisticians, and engineers work to continuously evaluate food products and assess the nutritional value of products on the market. “I’m pretty intent on making sure the ingredients are updated and accurate,” said Felton in an email to Digital Trends.

“As the digital dietitian for the ShopWell community, I feel a true responsibility to ensuring every consumer has access to their nutrition information, can easily use our app to see how well they are shopping for their families, and above all, offer healthier recommendations,” said Felton. “I can’t tell you how much I enjoy seeing that over 70 percent of people buy the better-for-you recommendations we make!”

ShopWell is available on iOS and Android devices, as well as on the Web.

Also watch: MSI’s Vortex brings 4K gaming anywhere in your home
Please enable Javascript to watch this video

They say that ignorance is bliss, but when a lack of knowledge has a negative impact on your health, the saying suddenly doesn’t seem to hold true. Fortunately, if you don’t like being caught unaware when it comes to nutrition, you don’t have to be. There are numerous apps out there that can help you eat better, whether that means determining the nutritional value of food on your plate or making healthy choices at the grocery store.

ShopWell is for doing the latter. Operated under registered dietitian nutritionist Lara Felton, the app offers personalized food scores for users’ unique needs and tools like Quick Tips and Smart Lists for specific conditions, from high cholesterol to food allergies. The company’s goal is to make nutritional information digestible (pun intended) so that it’s easy to bring home healthy food from the grocery store.

Related: Food porn psychology: New study reveals Instagramming your food makes it taste better

ShopWell’s scoring system is particularly interesting. Scores are based on a variety of factors, including age, gender, and users’ ingredient and nutrition preferences. Personalized scores are generated on a 1-100 scale, and then color coded as green (strong matches; between 70-100), yellow (medium matches; 40-69), and red (weak matches; 0-39). Naturally, green items are considered best for you, while yellow indicates caution and red means that you should reconsider or eat only in moderation. A warning is shown if a product contains one of the allergens you’ve listed.

ShopWell’s algorithm is based on carefully gathered information from registered dietitians and medical professionals. Furthermore, a team of registered dietitians, Stanford University statisticians, and engineers work to continuously evaluate food products and assess the nutritional value of products on the market. “I’m pretty intent on making sure the ingredients are updated and accurate,” said Felton in an email to Digital Trends.

“As the digital dietitian for the ShopWell community, I feel a true responsibility to ensuring every consumer has access to their nutrition information, can easily use our app to see how well they are shopping for their families, and above all, offer healthier recommendations,” said Felton. “I can’t tell you how much I enjoy seeing that over 70 percent of people buy the better-for-you recommendations we make!”

ShopWell is available on iOS and Android devices, as well as on the Web.

Also watch: MSI’s Vortex brings 4K gaming anywhere in your home

Please enable Javascript to watch this video