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How to cancel your free trial of Apple News+ before it charges you $9.99

Todd Haselton
  • If you signed up for Apple News+ on launch day, March 25, you're about to be billed for the first time when your 30-day trial ends.
  • The free trial for Apple News+ ends for the first subscribers this week, but it's easy to cancel if you don't want to use it.
  • This guide walks you through how to cancel Apple News+ so that you don't get billed $9.99 if you don't want to use it any longer.

Apple AAPL launched its new all-you-can-eat magazine and news subscription service, Apple News+ , on March 25.

If you started to use it on that day, your free 30-day free trial is almost finished, and you'll automatically be billed $9.99 on April 25 to continue using it for another month. It's easy to cancel if you don't want to continue paying.

Apple News+ is great for people who read a lot of magazines and newspapers and who might otherwise have paid much more per month for individual subscriptions. Access to the Wall Street Journal, the New Yorker, Vanity Fair and other magazines makes it more than worth the cost to me.

But it isn't for everyone, especially folks who don't want magazine subscriptions or who don't like that reading stories from Apple News+ publications have to be read within the app.

So, if you want to cancel it, here's what to do:

  • Open Apple News+ on your iPad, iPhone or Mac.
  • Tap the menu button on the top-left side of the app.
  • Scroll all the way down to the bottom and choose "Manage subscriptions."
  • Scroll to the Apple News+ subscription and click it.
  • Tap "Cancel free trial."

You'll immediately lose access to Apple News+ when you cancel it, but you can always subscribe again later.

You'll still be able to access all of the free content in Apple News, but you will lose access to hundreds of magazines and premium access to stories from the Wall Street Journal and the Los Angeles Times.

Just remember to do this before April 25 if you don't want to be billed $9.99 per month moving forward.

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