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Who is Carlos Ghosn and how much is he worth?

Angelica Stabile

The great escapist, Carlos Ghosn, the former CEO of the world's largest automaker wanted for financial crimes, managed to flee Japan while under surveillance and make his way to Lebanon in a big, black box.

So who is the man who pulled off such an incredible getaway?

Aside from now being an international fugitive, Ghosn has served as CEO of several major Asian auto companies including Michelin North America, Renault, Nissan and Mitsubishi. And according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index, Ghosn is worth about $120 million and owns about $60 million of shares in Nissan, Renault and Mitsubishi.

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Ghosn was also CEO of the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance, which has been considered the world’s largest automaker, according to Forbes.

In 1996, Ghosn became best known for his hand in turning around the profitability of Renault, and he was given the nickname “Le Cost Killer,” according to The Telegraph in the U.K.

Ghosn joined Nissan in 1999 to attempt the same sort of financial turnaround. After finding success, Ghosn was deemed a “miracle worker” and was awarded Asia Businessman of the Year 2002, according to Fortune.

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The business guru became a celebrity in Japan and an internationally-respected business leader throughout the early 2000s and 2010s. Ghosn eventually stepped down as Nissan CEO in 2017, while still remaining chairman.

In November 2018, Ghosn was arrested at Tokyo airport over claims of financial misconduct, including underreporting his salary and using company assets for personal use, according to BBC.

Nissan made the unanimous decision to remove Ghosn from the board.

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Ghosn’s decision to flee Japan sprouted from Japanese authority banning him from speaking to his wife, Carole Ghosn, he told FOX Business. Ghosn said he felt trapped in his apartment, which was under surveillance and he does not think he would receive a fair trial in Japan, which is why he escaped to Lebanon where he is a citizen and which does not have an extradition treaty with Japan.

After his escape, the international law enforcement agency, Interpol, issued a "red notice" for Ghosn. The notice is a "be-on-the-lookout"-type memo issued by Interpol – the International Criminal Police Organization – to its nearly 200 member countries asking that the wanted person be extradited to the country from which he or she is a fugitive.

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