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Chalice Gold Mines (ASX:CHN) Shares Have Generated A Total Return Of 2.1% In The Last Year

Simply Wall St

It's easy to match the overall market return by buying an index fund. Active investors aim to buy stocks that vastly outperform the market - but in the process, they risk under-performance. Unfortunately the Chalice Gold Mines Limited (ASX:CHN) share price slid 24% over twelve months. That's well bellow the market return of 11%. At least the damage isn't so bad if you look at the last three years, since the stock is down 19% in that time. Unfortunately the share price momentum is still quite negative, with prices down 19% in thirty days.

See our latest analysis for Chalice Gold Mines

With just AU$731,889 worth of revenue in twelve months, we don't think the market considers Chalice Gold Mines to have proven its business plan. We can't help wondering why it's publicly listed so early in its journey. Are venture capitalists not interested? So it seems shareholders are too busy dreaming about the progress to come than dwelling on the current (lack of) revenue. It seems likely some shareholders believe that Chalice Gold Mines will find or develop a valuable new mine before too long.

We think companies that have neither significant revenues nor profits are pretty high risk. You should be aware that there is always a chance that this sort of company will need to issue more shares to raise money to continue pursuing its business plan. While some companies like this go on to deliver on their plan, making good money for shareholders, many end in painful losses and eventual de-listing.

When it last reported its balance sheet in December 2018, Chalice Gold Mines had net cash of AU$23m. That's not too bad but management may have to think about raising capital or taking on debt, unless the company is close to breaking even. With the share price down 24% in the last year, it seems likely that the need for cash is weighing on investors' minds. The image below shows how Chalice Gold Mines's balance sheet has changed over time; if you want to see the precise values, simply click on the image.

ASX:CHN Historical Debt, April 24th 2019

In reality it's hard to have much certainty when valuing a business that has neither revenue or profit. Given that situation, would you be concerned if it turned out insiders were relentlessly selling stock? I would feel more nervous about the company if that were so. It only takes a moment for you to check whether we have identified any insider sales recently.

What about the Total Shareholder Return (TSR)?

Investors should note that there's a difference between Chalice Gold Mines's total shareholder return (TSR) and its share price change, which we've covered above. The TSR is a return calculation that accounts for the value of cash dividends (assuming that any dividend received was reinvested) and the calculated value of any discounted capital raisings and spin-offs. We note that Chalice Gold Mines's TSR, at 2.1% is higher than its share price return of -24%. When you consider it hasn't been paying a dividend, this data suggests shareholders have benefitted from a spin-off, or had the opportunity to acquire attractively priced shares in a discounted capital raising.

A Different Perspective

Chalice Gold Mines shareholders gained a total return of 2.1% during the year. But that return falls short of the market. It's probably a good sign that the company has an even better long term track record, having provided shareholders with an annual TSR of 2.4% over five years. It may well be that this is a business worth popping on the watching, given the continuing positive reception, over time, from the market. If you would like to research Chalice Gold Mines in more detail then you might want to take a look at whether insiders have been buying or selling shares in the company.

If you would prefer to check out another company -- one with potentially superior financials -- then do not miss this free list of companies that have proven they can grow earnings.

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on AU exchanges.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.