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Coronavirus restrictions inspire Miami Botox drive-thru

Jeanette Settembre
·2 min read

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This drive-thru serves Botox.

A Miami-based plastic surgeon is administering injectables for Americans prioritizing vanity as they come out of quarantine.

Dr. Michael Salzhauer, also known as Dr. Miami, is offering injections of the wrinkle reducer Botox to patients who simply pull up to his Bal Harbour office as they would a McDonald’s drive-thru window in minutes, the Miami New Times reported.

HOW CORONAVIRUS AFFECTS SALONS, SPA REOPENINGS

"Just wear a mask, put your head out the car window," Salzhauer told the newspaper. "Pull right on up. Five minutes. Boom, boom, Botox, and they're on their way."

Salzhauer’s website says a shot at his medical drive-thru to smooth out crow’s feet, worry lines and frown lines costs $300, and customers who buy two sessions at once pay $600 and get their third free. Botox is the only injectable being offered.

WHY MALE BUSINESS LEADERS USE BOTOX

Patients who have the money to spare are told to schedule an appointment and fill out a medical history form to be sure they have not been exhibiting coronavirus symptoms.

While some may raise eyebrows at the thought of spending hundreds of dollars on the service, a number of plastic surgeons have been making house calls to their wealthy clients, particularly in states that haven’t fully reopened like New York where stay-at-home orders are in place.

Other plastic surgeons, however, advise against the quickie procedure, saying it can result in damage.

"It's a lawsuit waiting to happen," Dr. Michael Hall, another Miami-based board-certified plastic surgeon who specializes in anti-aging and longevity, told FOX Business. "You don't have adequate lighting or steady control over the patient while they're in a car. You risk potential harm."

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ON FOX BUSINESS

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