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Could you be replaced by a robot at work?

The title of Geoff Colvin’s new book says it all: Humans are Underrated.

Colvin, Senior Editor-at-Large at Fortune, sat down with Yahoo Finance to talk about whether robots could take over the workforce someday, and explain which jobs are here to stay.

“The way to think about this is not to ask, ‘what is it computers cannot do?’ because every time we try to answer that question, we get it wrong,” Colvin explained.

For example, the classic, “robots can’t show emotion” excuse doesn’t hold up so well these days. He explained that modern technology allows certain robots to detect and even express (albeit through animation) human emotion.

Instead of thinking about what robots can’t do, Colvin suggested considering what sorts of things humans will always “insist” to do with other human beings.

So, what jobs are safe?

Anything that requires empathy, relationship building, story telling or collaboration. Basically, any sort of job that you wouldn’t want a robot doing.  

Colvin offered sales as an example. While a lot of sales jobs are automated these days, there are certain types of transactions that we will always want to conduct with other humans. For instance, selling a TV show, or selling an expensive, highly specified product, like a wind turbine.

While this is good news for people who work in highly creative and/or collaborative fields with lots of human interaction, it’s bad news for pretty much everyone else.

Colvin argues that if your line of work is highly repetitive – whether in an office or a factory – “a machine can probably do it, and will probably do it, faster than you think.”

Even the oft-lauded STEM fields aren’t safe.

“Being an engineer is great, but you’re not going to be a high value engineer unless you also bring the human skills,” Colvin said.