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Did Changing Sentiment Drive Currency Exchange International's (TSE:CXI) Share Price Down By 34%?

Simply Wall St

The simplest way to benefit from a rising market is to buy an index fund. But if you buy individual stocks, you can do both better or worse than that. For example, the Currency Exchange International, Corp. (TSE:CXI) share price is down 34% in the last year. That falls noticeably short of the market return of around 14%. Notably, shareholders had a tough run over the longer term, too, with a drop of 32% in the last three years. The silver lining is that the stock is up 2.2% in about a week.

See our latest analysis for Currency Exchange International

While markets are a powerful pricing mechanism, share prices reflect investor sentiment, not just underlying business performance. One imperfect but simple way to consider how the market perception of a company has shifted is to compare the change in the earnings per share (EPS) with the share price movement.

Unfortunately Currency Exchange International reported an EPS drop of 33% for the last year. This change in EPS is remarkably close to the 34% decrease in the share price. So it seems that the market sentiment has not changed much, despite the weak results. Rather, the share price is remains a similar multiple of the EPS, suggesting the outlook remains the same.

The image below shows how EPS has tracked over time (if you click on the image you can see greater detail).

TSX:CXI Past and Future Earnings, January 24th 2020

It's good to see that there was some significant insider buying in the last three months. That's a positive. That said, we think earnings and revenue growth trends are even more important factors to consider. It might be well worthwhile taking a look at our free report on Currency Exchange International's earnings, revenue and cash flow.

A Different Perspective

Currency Exchange International shareholders are down 34% for the year, but the market itself is up 14%. However, keep in mind that even the best stocks will sometimes underperform the market over a twelve month period. Regrettably, last year's performance caps off a bad run, with the shareholders facing a total loss of 5.8% per year over five years. Generally speaking long term share price weakness can be a bad sign, though contrarian investors might want to research the stock in hope of a turnaround. It's always interesting to track share price performance over the longer term. But to understand Currency Exchange International better, we need to consider many other factors. For instance, we've identified 3 warning signs for Currency Exchange International that you should be aware of.

If you like to buy stocks alongside management, then you might just love this free list of companies. (Hint: insiders have been buying them).

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on CA exchanges.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Thank you for reading.