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A sneak peek at Disney's streaming service lineup

Sarah Perez
A new report offers a few more details as to what Disney has in store for its upcoming Netflix rival.

A new report offers a few more details as to what Disney has in store for its upcoming Netflix rival. The company last August had announced plans to debut its own streaming service in 2019 with content like Star Wars and Marvel movies, Disney studio and Pixar films. This week Deadline offered a sneak peek into the service's initial slate of content, which will include four to five original movies and five TV shows in its first year, none of which will be R-rated.

The shows may cost $25 million to $35 million for 10 episodes, though a more ambitious series could go up to $100 million, the report said.

In terms of feature film content, Deadline got wind of a variety of projects including "Don Quixote," "Lady and the Tramp" (directed by Julia Hart) "The Paper Magician," "Stargirl," "Togo" (directed by Ericson Core), "3 Men and a Baby," "Sword and the Stone," and "Timmy Failure (with Tom McCarthy involved).

In post-production are a Mark Waters-directed film "Magic Camp," and the Mark Lawrence-directed Noelle with Anna Kendrick, Bill Hader and Shirley MacLaine.

And for TV shows, the service will have "High School Musical," an animated "Monsters Inc." series, a Marvel live-action title, and a "Star Wars" live-action title.

Disney CEO Bog Iger said on the company earnings call this week that the company would actually be developing "a few 'Star Wars' series" for the Disney's streaming service; one was already known to be a live-action series.

The report also indicated that Disney would not be pulling its Marvel series from Netflix for the time being.

Meanwhile, the Disney service - as many have expected - will not include R-rated content. That will go to Hulu, Deadline said.

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