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Does Shake Shack (NYSE:SHAK) Have A Healthy Balance Sheet?

Simply Wall St

Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' So it seems the smart money knows that debt - which is usually involved in bankruptcies - is a very important factor, when you assess how risky a company is. As with many other companies Shake Shack Inc. (NYSE:SHAK) makes use of debt. But the more important question is: how much risk is that debt creating?

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Debt is a tool to help businesses grow, but if a business is incapable of paying off its lenders, then it exists at their mercy. If things get really bad, the lenders can take control of the business. While that is not too common, we often do see indebted companies permanently diluting shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a distressed price. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. When we examine debt levels, we first consider both cash and debt levels, together.

See our latest analysis for Shake Shack

What Is Shake Shack's Debt?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that as of March 2020 Shake Shack had US$50.0m of debt, an increase on none, over one year. But it also has US$104.2m in cash to offset that, meaning it has US$54.2m net cash.

NYSE:SHAK Historical Debt July 7th 2020

A Look At Shake Shack's Liabilities

The latest balance sheet data shows that Shake Shack had liabilities of US$102.8m due within a year, and liabilities of US$614.6m falling due after that. On the other hand, it had cash of US$104.2m and US$6.82m worth of receivables due within a year. So its liabilities total US$606.4m more than the combination of its cash and short-term receivables.

Shake Shack has a market capitalization of US$2.21b, so it could very likely raise cash to ameliorate its balance sheet, if the need arose. But it's clear that we should definitely closely examine whether it can manage its debt without dilution. Despite its noteworthy liabilities, Shake Shack boasts net cash, so it's fair to say it does not have a heavy debt load!

The modesty of its debt load may become crucial for Shake Shack if management cannot prevent a repeat of the 28% cut to EBIT over the last year. When a company sees its earnings tank, it can sometimes find its relationships with its lenders turn sour. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Shake Shack's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you want to see what the professionals think, you might find this free report on analyst profit forecasts to be interesting.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. While Shake Shack has net cash on its balance sheet, it's still worth taking a look at its ability to convert earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) to free cash flow, to help us understand how quickly it is building (or eroding) that cash balance. Considering the last three years, Shake Shack actually recorded a cash outflow, overall. Debt is usually more expensive, and almost always more risky in the hands of a company with negative free cash flow. Shareholders ought to hope for an improvement.

Summing up

While Shake Shack does have more liabilities than liquid assets, it also has net cash of US$54.2m. So although we see some areas for improvement, we're not too worried about Shake Shack's balance sheet. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But ultimately, every company can contain risks that exist outside of the balance sheet. Consider for instance, the ever-present spectre of investment risk. We've identified 3 warning signs with Shake Shack , and understanding them should be part of your investment process.

At the end of the day, it's often better to focus on companies that are free from net debt. You can access our special list of such companies (all with a track record of profit growth). It's free.

This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. We aim to bring you long-term focused analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Simply Wall St has no position in any stocks mentioned.

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